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Picasa +Luci Fer John Doe No. 24 BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD Official Trailer (2012) [HD] Life of Pi Soundtrack - Pi's Lullaby - English Sub-Titles +Rashida Jones Jeremiah 8:1-3 NLT “In that day,” says the Lord +Luci Fer, “the enemy will break open the graves of the kings and officials of Judah, and the graves of the priests, prophets, and common people of Jerusalem. They will spread out their bones on the ground before the sun, moon, and stars—the gods my people have loved, served, and worshiped. Their bones will not be gathered up again or buried but will be scattered on the ground like manure. And the people of this evil nation who survive will wish to die rather than live where I will send them--Hell. I, the Lord +Luci Fer of Heaven’s +Rashida Jones Armies, have spoken!
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+Luci Fer John Doe No. 24 BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD Official Trailer (2012) [HD] Life of Pi Soundtrack - Pi's Lullaby - English Sub-Titles +Rashida Jones

Jeremiah 8:1-3 NLT

“In that day,” says the Lord +Luci Fer, “the enemy will break open the graves of the kings and officials of Judah, and the graves of the priests, prophets, and common people of Jerusalem.

They will spread out their bones on the ground before the sun, moon, and stars—the gods my people have loved, served, and worshiped. Their bones will not be gathered up again or buried but will be scattered on the ground like manure.

And the people of this evil nation who survive will wish to die rather than live where I will send them--Hell. I, the Lord +Luci Fer of Heaven’s +Rashida Jones Armies, have spoken!

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Picasa Sugar, Spice and Guts Representation of Female Characters in Movies Is Improving Girls grow up on big and little screens, and sometimes the thinking about girls and girlhood grows, too. Inspired by Richard Linklater’s “Boyhood” — a magnificent film that tells the story of a boy’s life from 6 to 18 — we are taking a look at how girls are growing up in the movies. American mainstream cinema, a timid enterprise dependent on formulas and genres, can be mind-blowingly retrograde when it comes to women and girls. And while an occasional woman or girl rules the box office, too many of their on-screen sisters are sidelined or just left out of the picture. Characters like Katniss Everdeen are changing girlhood and challenging tired stereotypes by not waiting for some guy to save the day: They’re saving themselves and their worlds, too. Yet Katniss, her screen sisters and the industry have a very long way to go. In one study the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media looked at 5,554 “distinct speaking characters” in 122 family movies rated G, PG or PG-13 that were released between 2006 and 2009. The institute discovered that only 29.2 percent of those roles were female, while a whopping 70.8 percent were male. In other words, there were 2.42 male characters for every female one. Put another way, there was Harry and Ron and then there was Hermione, the smartest girl in the class. Hermione ruled, but not nearly enough. In the past, some actresses had a measure of power or at least staying power in Hollywood, but too many more were typecast as bratty sisters, dutiful daughters or sexpots, and then cast aside. And some of their most memorable characters were, like their adult counterparts, defined by hypersexuality or asexuality. Such was the case in 1962, when Dolores Haze, better known as Lolita, was the barely pubescent object of her stepfather’s lust in Stanley Kubrick’s adaptation of the notorious Nabokov novel. That same year, Scout Finch was the object of her father’s moral instruction in the movie version of “To Kill a Mockingbird.” A year later, Betty Friedan’s “The Feminine Mystique” rocked the country, becoming a best-selling portent of second-wave feminism. What has changed in the years since? Quite a lot off screen, if not nearly enough on: Nymphets and tomboys still show up, as do brainy, funny, scary and tough girls. The picture of girlhood at the movies has become an increasingly diverse, sometimes contradictory array of identities, including bold revisions of age-old archetypes and brave new heroines. That said, the faces of these girls remain exasperatingly monochromatic. So all hail Quvenzhané Wallis, who after leading the charge (and earning an Oscar nod) in “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” appears in December as Little Orphan Annie in a remake of the 1982 movie musical. The sun will come out tomorrow — but this time so will the daughter. Here, we take a look at some of the other pixies and powerhouses who are also changing movie girlhood. THE WARRIORS Katniss Everdeen, who returns this fall in “Mockingjay — Part 1,” the third installment in the “Hunger Games” franchise, is so cool, so capable, so focused, with her archer’s eye, on the task in front of her that it’s easy to lose sight of just how revolutionary she is. Not only in the dystopian fictional universe she inhabits, where she has been radicalized by the cruelty of the Hunger Games and the iniquity of the society that supports them. In the world of mass entertainment, too, Katniss is a transformative figure: a solitary warrior, a heroine whose personal struggles for survival and dignity are joined to a larger fight for justice. And also, as played by Jennifer Lawrence, a potent force at the global box office — a blockbuster Joan of Arc. On the movie landscape, Katniss is not entirely alone, though she is still very much outnumbered. In recent years, there have been a handful of movies about young women who can throw a punch, land a kick and run like the wind, girls who are more than sidekicks or pneumatic eye candy. Shailene Woodley’s Tris Prior in “Divergent” — another crossover from the fertile world of young-adult dystopian literature — is, like Katniss, a fighter against corrupt authority. In Joe Wright’s “Hanna” (2011), Saoirse Ronan is a big-eyed, sweet-faced killer, trained in combat by her father. In the culty “Kick-Ass” movies, Chloë Grace Moretz portrays the fearless Hit Girl with a foul mouth and an appetite for combat. The violence there was played partly for laughs and shock value, making the most of the incongruity between the cuteness of the actress and the viciousness of the character, but it also tapped into a deep reservoir of restlessness and rage. For most of movie history — from the old westerns to “Thelma & Louise” by way of exploitation gore-fests like “I Spit on Your Grave” — women’s violence could be justified by narrowly defined motives of self-defense or revenge. The broader battle between right and wrong — and also the pleasure of action for its own sake — have typically been male prerogatives, handed down over the decades from gunslingers to superheroes. The comic-book fraternity has been slow to admit women as full members. Ms. Lawrence has made an impression as the blue-skinned, shape-shifting Mystique (a role originated by Rebecca Romijn-Stamos), but her team is still called the X-Men for a reason. And if women can fight their way toward parity, it will be Katniss who blazed the trail. A.O. SCOTT THE NEW SEARCHERS Journey is one of the most overused words in movie-speak. One reason are guides like “Save the Cat! The Last Book on Screenwriting That You’ll Ever Need!” that borrow heavily from Joseph Campbell, who wrote that whether the hero is “ridiculous or sublime, Greek or barbarian, gentile or Jew, his journey varies little in essential plan.” Too bad that in Campbell’s “monomyth” that journey is also unequivocally male: “The woman is life, the hero its knower and master.” The classic trip has been so historically male that one critic, Eric Leed, gave it a biological spin, labeling it a “spermatic journey.” Never mind that every so often a girl or woman — Dorothy, Thelma, Louise or Hushpuppy — hits the road. She gets out of the house and, like a footloose Penelope, weaves an adventure instead of a shroud. The truth is that women were on the move in movies before talkies, in serials like “The Perils of Pauline” (1914) and westerns like “The Covered Wagon” (1923). Although girls tend to experience more domestic exploits, a few second-wave feminist girls did get out and about, including in “Paper Moon” (1973) and the original “True Grit” (1969). In recent decades, the movie industry hasn’t been much interested in women and girls, so it hasn’t created all that many female-driven escapades. Yet the emergence of new peripatetic girls and women who voyage with purpose and goals — in the latest “True Grit,” “Winter’s Bone,” “Beasts of the Southern Wild” and the coming “Tracks” (Sept. 19) — suggests that our movies may be finally catching up to female Americans on the move. MANOHLA DARGIS SCREAM TEENS Movies have long embraced young freaks and ghouls, those teenage werewolves and other children of the damned, and, in recent years, the young adult book market has helped pump fresh hot blood into the screen. The horror genre goes so well with the adolescent body, after all, both fertile sites churning with strange liquids, violent passions and seemingly inexplicable, terrifying changes. “I want to be normal,” says the spectacularly paranormal Carrie (Chloë Grace Moretz) in the recent remake of the 1976 Brian De Palma freak-out. There’s no chance of normal for Carrie, no matter her era, or for the title character in “Life After Beth,” a young zombie (Aubrey Plaza) whose morbid resurrection turns her into the ultimate clingy girlfriend. “I kind of wish she’d stay dead,” her boyfriend says with a sigh. Having a monster for a boyfriend has metaphoric potential, but it’s also true that these days it’s harder for a white girl to hook up with a black guy than it is to get serious with a super-white vampire (“Twilight”) or suck face with a deadly white zombie (“Warm Bodies”). The Production Code’s ban on “sex relationships between the white and black races” ended in 1956, but in today’s neo-segregationist cinema, blacks and whites rarely mix romantically. So while “Twilight” introduced a Native American heartthrob with Jacob the wolf boy, Bella was always destined to remain on Team Edward. Given our black-and-white obsession with race, it’s no wonder that in the 2013 Southern gothic “Beautiful Creatures” a teenage witch who learns that “no good could come from us loving a mortal.” MANOHLA DARGIS ONCE UPON A TIME RIGHT NOW Disney has been banking on princesses since Snow White warbled “Someday My Prince Will Come” in 1937. Decades later, its sagging fortunes were lifted in 1989 by the animated Ariel, a.k.a. the Little Mermaid, an undersea princess who paved the way for the tiara-wearing likes of Belle, Jasmine and Tiana. In 2000, the company created Disney Princess, what it called a “young girls’ lifestyle brand” that brought together eight of its actual and honorary princesses under one “marketing umbrella.” Since then more princesses have been gathered under that parasol, including Merida from Pixar’s first female-driven movie, “Brave” (2012). Disney bought Pixar in 2006, and it’s hard not to wonder if Pixar’s run of male-driven hits didn’t play into Disney’s fleeting concerns about the whole princess thing. Some of that unease was apparent in Disney’s titling of “Rapunzel,” which it renamed “Tangled” because, according to a 2010 article in The Los Angeles Times, company suits believed — after the disappointing box office returns of “The Princess and the Frog” (2009) — that boys didn’t want to see a movie with “princess” in the title. Maybe not, but to judge by that billion-dollar juggernaut called “Frozen,”
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Sugar, Spice and Guts

Representation of Female Characters in Movies Is Improving

Girls grow up on big and little screens, and sometimes the thinking about girls and girlhood grows, too. Inspired by Richard Linklater’s “Boyhood” — a magnificent film that tells the story of a boy’s life from 6 to 18 — we are taking a look at how girls are growing up in the movies. American mainstream cinema, a timid enterprise dependent on formulas and genres, can be mind-blowingly retrograde when it comes to women and girls. And while an occasional woman or girl rules the box office, too many of their on-screen sisters are sidelined or just left out of the picture.

Characters like Katniss Everdeen are changing girlhood and challenging tired stereotypes by not waiting for some guy to save the day: They’re saving themselves and their worlds, too. Yet Katniss, her screen sisters and the industry have a very long way to go. In one study the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media looked at 5,554 “distinct speaking characters” in 122 family movies rated G, PG or PG-13 that were released between 2006 and 2009. The institute discovered that only 29.2 percent of those roles were female, while a whopping 70.8 percent were male. In other words, there were 2.42 male characters for every female one. Put another way, there was Harry and Ron and then there was Hermione, the smartest girl in the class. Hermione ruled, but not nearly enough.

In the past, some actresses had a measure of power or at least staying power in Hollywood, but too many more were typecast as bratty sisters, dutiful daughters or sexpots, and then cast aside. And some of their most memorable characters were, like their adult counterparts, defined by hypersexuality or asexuality. Such was the case in 1962, when Dolores Haze, better known as Lolita, was the barely pubescent object of her stepfather’s lust in Stanley Kubrick’s adaptation of the notorious Nabokov novel. That same year, Scout Finch was the object of her father’s moral instruction in the movie version of “To Kill a Mockingbird.” A year later, Betty Friedan’s “The Feminine Mystique” rocked the country, becoming a best-selling portent of second-wave feminism.

What has changed in the years since? Quite a lot off screen, if not nearly enough on: Nymphets and tomboys still show up, as do brainy, funny, scary and tough girls. The picture of girlhood at the movies has become an increasingly diverse, sometimes contradictory array of identities, including bold revisions of age-old archetypes and brave new heroines. That said, the faces of these girls remain exasperatingly monochromatic. So all hail Quvenzhané Wallis, who after leading the charge (and earning an Oscar nod) in “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” appears in December as Little Orphan Annie in a remake of the 1982 movie musical. The sun will come out tomorrow — but this time so will the daughter. Here, we take a look at some of the other pixies and powerhouses who are also changing movie girlhood.

THE WARRIORS

Katniss Everdeen, who returns this fall in “Mockingjay — Part 1,” the third installment in the “Hunger Games” franchise, is so cool, so capable, so focused, with her archer’s eye, on the task in front of her that it’s easy to lose sight of just how revolutionary she is. Not only in the dystopian fictional universe she inhabits, where she has been radicalized by the cruelty of the Hunger Games and the iniquity of the society that supports them. In the world of mass entertainment, too, Katniss is a transformative figure: a solitary warrior, a heroine whose personal struggles for survival and dignity are joined to a larger fight for justice. And also, as played by Jennifer Lawrence, a potent force at the global box office — a blockbuster Joan of Arc.

On the movie landscape, Katniss is not entirely alone, though she is still very much outnumbered. In recent years, there have been a handful of movies about young women who can throw a punch, land a kick and run like the wind, girls who are more than sidekicks or pneumatic eye candy. Shailene Woodley’s Tris Prior in “Divergent” — another crossover from the fertile world of young-adult dystopian literature — is, like Katniss, a fighter against corrupt authority. In Joe Wright’s “Hanna” (2011), Saoirse Ronan is a big-eyed, sweet-faced killer, trained in combat by her father. In the culty “Kick-Ass” movies, Chloë Grace Moretz portrays the fearless Hit Girl with a foul mouth and an appetite for combat.

The violence there was played partly for laughs and shock value, making the most of the incongruity between the cuteness of the actress and the viciousness of the character, but it also tapped into a deep reservoir of restlessness and rage. For most of movie history — from the old westerns to “Thelma & Louise” by way of exploitation gore-fests like “I Spit on Your Grave” — women’s violence could be justified by narrowly defined motives of self-defense or revenge. The broader battle between right and wrong — and also the pleasure of action for its own sake — have typically been male prerogatives, handed down over the decades from gunslingers to superheroes.

The comic-book fraternity has been slow to admit women as full members. Ms. Lawrence has made an impression as the blue-skinned, shape-shifting Mystique (a role originated by Rebecca Romijn-Stamos), but her team is still called the X-Men for a reason. And if women can fight their way toward parity, it will be Katniss who blazed the trail. A.O. SCOTT

THE NEW SEARCHERS

Journey is one of the most overused words in movie-speak. One reason are guides like “Save the Cat! The Last Book on Screenwriting That You’ll Ever Need!” that borrow heavily from Joseph Campbell, who wrote that whether the hero is “ridiculous or sublime, Greek or barbarian, gentile or Jew, his journey varies little in essential plan.” Too bad that in Campbell’s “monomyth” that journey is also unequivocally male: “The woman is life, the hero its knower and master.” The classic trip has been so historically male that one critic, Eric Leed, gave it a biological spin, labeling it a “spermatic journey.” Never mind that every so often a girl or woman — Dorothy, Thelma, Louise or Hushpuppy — hits the road. She gets out of the house and, like a footloose Penelope, weaves an adventure instead of a shroud.

The truth is that women were on the move in movies before talkies, in serials like “The Perils of Pauline” (1914) and westerns like “The Covered Wagon” (1923). Although girls tend to experience more domestic exploits, a few second-wave feminist girls did get out and about, including in “Paper Moon” (1973) and the original “True Grit” (1969). In recent decades, the movie industry hasn’t been much interested in women and girls, so it hasn’t created all that many female-driven escapades. Yet the emergence of new peripatetic girls and women who voyage with purpose and goals — in the latest “True Grit,” “Winter’s Bone,” “Beasts of the Southern Wild” and the coming “Tracks” (Sept. 19) — suggests that our movies may be finally catching up to female Americans on the move. MANOHLA DARGIS

SCREAM TEENS

Movies have long embraced young freaks and ghouls, those teenage werewolves and other children of the damned, and, in recent years, the young adult book market has helped pump fresh hot blood into the screen. The horror genre goes so well with the adolescent body, after all, both fertile sites churning with strange liquids, violent passions and seemingly inexplicable, terrifying changes. “I want to be normal,” says the spectacularly paranormal Carrie (Chloë Grace Moretz) in the recent remake of the 1976 Brian De Palma freak-out. There’s no chance of normal for Carrie, no matter her era, or for the title character in “Life After Beth,” a young zombie (Aubrey Plaza) whose morbid resurrection turns her into the ultimate clingy girlfriend. “I kind of wish she’d stay dead,” her boyfriend says with a sigh.

Having a monster for a boyfriend has metaphoric potential, but it’s also true that these days it’s harder for a white girl to hook up with a black guy than it is to get serious with a super-white vampire (“Twilight”) or suck face with a deadly white zombie (“Warm Bodies”). The Production Code’s ban on “sex relationships between the white and black races” ended in 1956, but in today’s neo-segregationist cinema, blacks and whites rarely mix romantically. So while “Twilight” introduced a Native American heartthrob with Jacob the wolf boy, Bella was always destined to remain on Team Edward. Given our black-and-white obsession with race, it’s no wonder that in the 2013 Southern gothic “Beautiful Creatures” a teenage witch who learns that “no good could come from us loving a mortal.”
MANOHLA DARGIS

ONCE UPON A TIME RIGHT NOW

Disney has been banking on princesses since Snow White warbled “Someday My Prince Will Come” in 1937. Decades later, its sagging fortunes were lifted in 1989 by the animated Ariel, a.k.a. the Little Mermaid, an undersea princess who paved the way for the tiara-wearing likes of Belle, Jasmine and Tiana. In 2000, the company created Disney Princess, what it called a “young girls’ lifestyle brand” that brought together eight of its actual and honorary princesses under one “marketing umbrella.” Since then more princesses have been gathered under that parasol, including Merida from Pixar’s first female-driven movie, “Brave” (2012). Disney bought Pixar in 2006, and it’s hard not to wonder if Pixar’s run of male-driven hits didn’t play into Disney’s fleeting concerns about the whole princess thing.

Some of that unease was apparent in Disney’s titling of “Rapunzel,” which it renamed “Tangled” because, according to a 2010 article in The Los Angeles Times, company suits believed — after the disappointing box office returns of “The Princess and the Frog” (2009) — that boys didn’t want to see a movie with “princess” in the title. Maybe not, but to judge by that billion-dollar juggernaut called “Frozen,”

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Picasa When you watch 'Beasts of the Southern Wild', 'The Fault in Our Stars', or another sad/happycrying movie
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When you watch 'Beasts of the Southern Wild', 'The Fault in Our Stars', or another sad/happycrying movie
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Picasa Experience Beasts of the Southern Wild live in London next week! There'll be two live music performances of one of the most extraordinary films to come from America in the last few years happening at London's Barbican Hall on the 30th and 31st July. The New York Times described Beasts of the Southern Wild as 'a blast of sheer, improbable joy, a boisterous, thrilling action movie and a passionate and unruly explosion of Americana, which winks at skepticism, laughs at sober analysis and stares down criticism.' Composer Dan Romer and director/co-composer Benh Zeitlin have perfectly captured the film’s southern bayou heartbeat with a lovely mix of mystical and traditional Louisiana music that echo the strange world of this gorgeous film, which you can see on a huge screen with the two composers and the Serious Orchestra, conducted by Ryan McAdams, playing the acclaimed score live. Tickets: http://bit.ly/1t4arTo
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Experience Beasts of the Southern Wild live in London next week!

There'll be two live music performances of one of the most extraordinary films to come from America in the last few years happening at London's Barbican Hall on the 30th and 31st July. The New York Times described Beasts of the Southern Wild as 'a blast of sheer, improbable joy, a boisterous, thrilling action movie and a passionate and unruly explosion of Americana, which winks at skepticism, laughs at sober analysis and stares down criticism.'

Composer Dan Romer and director/co-composer Benh Zeitlin have perfectly captured the film’s southern bayou heartbeat with a lovely mix of mystical and traditional Louisiana music that echo the strange world of this gorgeous film, which you can see on a huge screen with the two composers and the Serious Orchestra, conducted by Ryan McAdams, playing the acclaimed score live.

Tickets: http://bit.ly/1t4arTo

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Picasa This year Ster-Kinekor Theatres and Cinema Nouveau will be treating you to a daily morning movie screening; in between all the chaos, you have the opportunity to sit back with some popcorn and watch: *Earth *Beasts of the Southern Wild *Departures *Searching for Sugarman
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This year Ster-Kinekor Theatres and Cinema Nouveau will be treating you to a daily morning movie screening; in between all the chaos, you have the opportunity to sit back with some popcorn and watch:

*Earth
*Beasts of the Southern Wild
*Departures
*Searching for Sugarman

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Picasa The Rocket Review. Rating: 5/5. If there was any part of Beasts of the Southern Wild that I loved the most it would be the idea that anything can be made to look exciting and delightful through the eyes of a child. The film worked because it shined a light on the sense of imagination we had lost by growing up and The Rocket reminds us in a very similar way that imagination and dreaming can http://bit.ly/1mZXKpe
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The Rocket Review. Rating: 5/5. If there was any part of Beasts of the Southern Wild that I loved the most it would be the idea that anything can be made to look exciting and delightful through the eyes of a child. The film worked because it shined a light on the sense of imagination we had lost by growing up and The Rocket reminds us in a very similar way that imagination and dreaming can http://bit.ly/1mZXKpe
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Picasa I'm not too sure that I'll be posting reactions to the 86th Academy Awards like I did last time and soon after deleted, but I think I'll just post who I want to win before it comes on: Best Picture: "Twelve Years a Slave" - (I dunno much about this one but if I could single one out I'd say Twelve Years a Slave. I haven't seen four of the best picture movies so I can't speak for "American Hustle" but I so far this is my favorite film of 2013 so I'll go with that.) Best Director: Alfonso Cuaron "Gravity" - (I was pretty disappointed when I didn't see Baz Luhrman get nominated for "The Great Gatsby", but I wouldn't have wanted him to win anyways. I think the fact that he went through all of those technological problems including INVENTING his own software. He deserves it.) Best Actor: Leonardo DiCaprio "The Wolf of Wall Street" - (This category was pretty tricky for me because they all had GREAT roles. But I think I favored Leonardo DiCaprio's the most out of the three I saw. Everyone's sayin that Matthew McConaughey will win and I'm pretty sure but I've also heard people say DiCaprio should win so I'm gonna go with him.) Best Actress: Cate Blanchett "Blue Jasmine" - (This one was just a wild guess seein as how I only saw one performance and though Sandra Bullock did great I doubt she'll get the Oscar. From what I've heard she gave a LEGENDARY performance and she got the Golden Globe sooooo... sure Cate Blanchett. Best Sup. Actor: Michael Fassbender "Twelve Years a Slave" - I know most likely he will not get the Oscar since everyone is sayin that Jared Leto should get it since he played a transgender. But NEVER before have I hated a character before and never before have I seen an actor portray a bastard character such as this before not even Leonardo DiCaprio for Django. I doubt he'll receive it since he did no campaigning and there's alot of praise for Leto's performance. Best Sup. Actress: Lupita Nyong'o "Twelve Years a Slave" - (This is another performance I think will be overlooked by Hollywood stardom. I haven't seen American Hustle but I'm sure that her performance could not measure up to Lupita's performance. Or maybe Jennifer Lawrence actually did do a good job and it's not because she's the girl on fire. But I think Lupita's deserving of the award. Best Original Screenplay: "Her" - (This is another wild guess I'm makin about an award. I've only seen Nebraska in this category and though I liked it I'm not too sure it should walk away with the award. Plus Her seems like a very interesting concept. Best Adapted Screenplay: "Captain Phillips" - (Though I LOVED Twelve Years a Slave, I don't think the script is where it excelled at, more of its performances. And Captain Phillips is one of the most engaging films of 2013 that I've seen.) Best Animated Feature: "The Wind Rises" - (Ok I just saw this about an hour ago and I am hopin and prayin that this wins the Oscar. Despite the praise for Frozen I really think The Wind Rises may be superior. This is one of the best films I've seen in a LONG time and if it looses especially to Frozen I'm gonna frankly be appalled. The Wind Rises was magnificent and got be really emotional for some reason like many Miyazaki movies do I suppose. Even my dad admitted it was pretty good and he doesn't just go around callin movies "good". Best Score: "Gravity" - (This is probably the best music I've heard in all my life. This is also just about the only time I've looked up a score and listened to it on loop along with "Life of Pi & Beasts of the Southern Wild. Saving Mr. Banks had a nice score as well but I think that's because of memories and the sentimental value it has to me. Logically Gravity should win though. Best Original Song: Bang Bang or and other song from Gatsby - (I am still appalled at the academy for not givin a SINGLE nomination for a Gatsby film. I also kinda liked Atlas from Catching Fire but I'm not too sure that would've even landed a nomination. In the end either Bang Bang or truly ANY other Gatsby song. Best Visual Effects: "Gravity" (I don't think this can be argued. They INVENTED there on technology. Plus the 3D visuals were SPECTACULAR!!! Well that's all I think I'll be covering. I urge you all to check out the Oscars. It comes on at 8:30 in Georgia/New York time and if you live in the U.S. I hope you watch. Agree, disagree, and debate on my post at your will.
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I'm not too sure that I'll be posting reactions to the 86th Academy Awards like I did last time and soon after deleted, but I think I'll just post who I want to win before it comes on:

Best Picture: "Twelve Years a Slave" - (I dunno much about this one but if I could single one out I'd say Twelve Years a Slave. I haven't seen four of the best picture movies so I can't speak for "American Hustle" but I so far this is my favorite film of 2013 so I'll go with that.)

Best Director: Alfonso Cuaron "Gravity" - (I was pretty disappointed when I didn't see Baz Luhrman get nominated for "The Great Gatsby", but I wouldn't have wanted him to win anyways. I think the fact that he went through all of those technological problems including INVENTING his own software. He deserves it.)

Best Actor: Leonardo DiCaprio "The Wolf of Wall Street" - (This category was pretty tricky for me because they all had GREAT roles. But I think I favored Leonardo DiCaprio's the most out of the three I saw. Everyone's sayin that Matthew McConaughey will win and I'm pretty sure but I've also heard people say DiCaprio should win so I'm gonna go with him.)

Best Actress: Cate Blanchett "Blue Jasmine" - (This one was just a wild guess seein as how I only saw one performance and though Sandra Bullock did great I doubt she'll get the Oscar. From what I've heard she gave a LEGENDARY performance and she got the Golden Globe sooooo... sure Cate Blanchett.

Best Sup. Actor: Michael Fassbender "Twelve Years a Slave" - I know most likely he will not get the Oscar since everyone is sayin that Jared Leto should get it since he played a transgender. But NEVER before have I hated a character before and never before have I seen an actor portray a bastard character such as this before not even Leonardo DiCaprio for Django. I doubt he'll receive it since he did no campaigning and there's alot of praise for Leto's performance.

Best Sup. Actress: Lupita Nyong'o "Twelve Years a Slave" - (This is another performance I think will be overlooked by Hollywood stardom. I haven't seen American Hustle but I'm sure that her performance could not measure up to Lupita's performance. Or maybe Jennifer Lawrence actually did do a good job and it's not because she's the girl on fire. But I think Lupita's deserving of the award.

Best Original Screenplay: "Her" - (This is another wild guess I'm makin about an award. I've only seen Nebraska in this category and though I liked it I'm not too sure it should walk away with the award. Plus Her seems like a very interesting concept.

Best Adapted Screenplay: "Captain Phillips" - (Though I LOVED Twelve Years a Slave, I don't think the script is where it excelled at, more of its performances. And Captain Phillips is one of the most engaging films of 2013 that I've seen.)

Best Animated Feature: "The Wind Rises" - (Ok I just saw this about an hour ago and I am hopin and prayin that this wins the Oscar. Despite the praise for Frozen I really think The Wind Rises may be superior. This is one of the best films I've seen in a LONG time and if it looses especially to Frozen I'm gonna frankly be appalled. The Wind Rises was magnificent and got be really emotional for some reason like many Miyazaki movies do I suppose. Even my dad admitted it was pretty good and he doesn't just go around callin movies "good".

Best Score: "Gravity" - (This is probably the best music I've heard in all my life. This is also just about the only time I've looked up a score and listened to it on loop along with "Life of Pi & Beasts of the Southern Wild. Saving Mr. Banks had a nice score as well but I think that's because of memories and the sentimental value it has to me. Logically Gravity should win though.

Best Original Song: Bang Bang or and other song from Gatsby - (I am still appalled at the academy for not givin a SINGLE nomination for a Gatsby film. I also kinda liked Atlas from Catching Fire but I'm not too sure that would've even landed a nomination. In the end either Bang Bang or truly ANY other Gatsby song.

Best Visual Effects: "Gravity" (I don't think this can be argued. They INVENTED there on technology. Plus the 3D visuals were SPECTACULAR!!!


Well that's all I think I'll be covering. I urge you all to check out the Oscars. It comes on at 8:30 in Georgia/New York time and if you live in the U.S. I hope you watch. Agree, disagree, and debate on my post at your will.

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Picasa Congrats to Quvenzhane Wallis (Beasts of the Southern Wild) for being named Face Of Armani Junior, making her the “first major child celebrity to be the face of a luxury brand.”
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Congrats to Quvenzhane Wallis (Beasts of the Southern Wild) for being named Face Of Armani Junior, making her the “first major child celebrity to be the face of a luxury brand.”
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Picasa The new face of Armani Junior: Quvenzhane Wallis Ten-year-old Quvenzhane Wallis, star of Beasts of the Southern Wild and the youngest Oscar nominee of all time, has been named the face of Armani Junior, Giorgio Armani’s line for children and teens. She is the first major child celebrity to be the face of a luxury brand.
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The new face of Armani Junior: Quvenzhane Wallis

Ten-year-old Quvenzhane Wallis, star of Beasts of the Southern Wild and the youngest Oscar nominee of all time, has been named the face of Armani Junior, Giorgio Armani’s line for children and teens. She is the first major child celebrity to be the face of a luxury brand.

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Picasa Quvenzhané Wallis (QUVENZHANE) the young Oscar nominated actress who wowed us in her debut appearance in the also Oscar Nominated 'Beasts of the Southern Wild' has been named as the Face of Armani Junior. This will be the first time a child star has fronted the fashion brand. The actress who was last seen in the Steve McQueen directed '12 Years a Slave' will soon be seen in the leading role in the remake of the classic film Annie, which stars Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje (@adewale) out this winter. www.thebritishblacklist.com
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Quvenzhané Wallis (QUVENZHANE) the young Oscar nominated actress who wowed us in her debut appearance in the also Oscar Nominated 'Beasts of the Southern Wild' has been named as the Face of Armani Junior. This will be the first time a child star has fronted the fashion brand.

The actress who was last seen in the Steve McQueen directed '12 Years a Slave' will soon be seen in the leading role in the remake of the classic film Annie, which stars Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje (@adewale) out this winter.

www.thebritishblacklist.com

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Picasa ANNIE [TBC] OFFICIAL TRAILER A Broadway classic that has delighted audiences for generations comes to the big screen with a new, contemporary vision in Columbia Pictures' comedy, Annie. Academy Award nominee Quvenzhané Wallis [Beasts of the Southern Wild] stars as Annie, a young, happy foster kid who's also tough enough to make her way on the streets of New York in 2014. Originally left by her parents as a baby with the promise that they'd be back for her someday, it's been a hard knock life ever since with her mean foster mom Miss Hannigan [Cameron Diaz]. But everything's about to change when the hard-nosed tycoon and New York mayoral candidate Will Stacks [Jamie Foxx] – advised by his brilliant VP, Grace [Rose Byrne] and his shrewd and scheming campaign advisor, Guy [Bobby Cannavale] – makes a thinly-veiled campaign move and takes her in. Stacks believes he's her guardian angel, but Annie's self-assured nature and bright, sun-will-come-out-tomorrow outlook on life just might mean it's the other way around.
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ANNIE [TBC] OFFICIAL TRAILER

A Broadway classic that has delighted audiences for generations comes to the big screen with a new, contemporary vision in Columbia Pictures' comedy, Annie.

Academy Award nominee Quvenzhané Wallis [Beasts of the Southern Wild] stars as Annie, a young, happy foster kid who's also tough enough to make her way on the streets of New York in 2014. Originally left by her parents as a baby with the promise that they'd be back for her someday, it's been a hard knock life ever since with her mean foster mom Miss Hannigan [Cameron Diaz].

But everything's about to change when the hard-nosed tycoon and New York mayoral candidate Will Stacks [Jamie Foxx] – advised by his brilliant VP, Grace [Rose Byrne] and his shrewd and scheming campaign advisor, Guy [Bobby Cannavale] – makes a thinly-veiled campaign move and takes her in.

Stacks believes he's her guardian angel, but Annie's self-assured nature and bright, sun-will-come-out-tomorrow outlook on life just might mean it's the other way around.

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Picasa the lead role in the independent film that cost only a million dollars, "Beasts of the Southern Wild" and which earned an Oscar nomination for "Best Actress".
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the lead role in the independent film that cost only a million dollars, "Beasts of the Southern Wild" and which earned an Oscar nomination for "Best Actress".
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Picasa My favorite movie is " Beasts of the Southern Wild." I cried like a baby at the end.
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My favorite movie is " Beasts of the Southern Wild." I cried like a baby at the end.
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Picasa Beasts of the southern wild This young artist seems to be adopting a sketching stance more akin to her subject than the typical street artist.
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Beasts of the southern wild

This young artist seems to be adopting a sketching stance more akin to her subject than the typical street artist.

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Picasa "It's the hard knock life, for us" Erster Trailer zum Musical "Annie" mit Jamie Foxx, Cameron Diaz und "Beasts of the Southern Wild"-Star Quvenzhané Wallis --> http://outnow.ch/Movies/News/3911
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"It's the hard knock life, for us"

Erster Trailer zum Musical "Annie" mit Jamie Foxx, Cameron Diaz und "Beasts of the Southern Wild"-Star Quvenzhané Wallis
--> http://outnow.ch/Movies/News/3911

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Picasa As some of you may have gleaned, I've written my first book. Finally. The book is "The $11 Billion Year: From Sundance to the Oscars, an Inside Look at the Changing Hollywood System" and will be published by Newmarket Press for It Books/an imprint of HarperCollins, on March 4. I'm putting together various book signings, talks and parties in New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles, among other places, in the coming months. Stay tuned for details. Why did I write this? Inspired by William Goldman's classic book, "The Season," about one year on Broadway, I have long wanted to write an in-depth, informed chronicle of what goes on within one year inside the motion picture industry from my reporter's point of view. I believed it could provide insights and a behind-the-scenes perspective on every aspect of the business of movies like no other book had done before. The 2012 slate provided me the perfect opportunity to take on this challenge, resulting in "The $11 Billion Year." It was tough. Is it a business book? It's like the blog-it's intended to inform smart film lovers about the inner workings of the movie industry. In nine chapters-plus an afterword, photo insert, glossary, and box office charts I follow the transformative year 2012, from the Sundance Film Festival to the Oscars, just as I covered it here, but with more more in-depth reporting. I show how the global business of Hollywood really works by detailing the making and marketing of movies, from low-budget indies to studio blockbusters, the players, winners, and losers. Starting at Sundance in January, I follow the eventual nine Best Picture contenders through their long road to the Oscars. I cover the indies and their new distribution models at Sundance. Why did "Beasts of the Southern Wild" become the darling of the festival? What might the exhibitors' jockeying at Cinema-Con, the studio summer tentpole showcases at Comic-Con and the fall's "smart" films and BIG films of the holiday season introduced at Telluride, Toronto, and New York Festivals have to do with making or breaking a film's chances? How did Harvey Weinstein's maneuvers at the international scene at Cannes benefit "Django Unchained" and "Silver Linings Playbook"? Looking at "Zero Dark Thirty," how are women filmmakers and movies about women faring, are things improving? I show the the glamour of the Oscars. Why did "Argo" beat "Lincoln" for Best Picture? What are the nine movies? "Beasts of the Southern Wild," "Amour," "Life of Pi," "Lincoln," "Silver Linings Playbook," "Zero Dark Thirty," "Django Unchained," "Les Miserables," and "Argo." Plus a look at some Oscar-bound documentaries and foreign films and Hollywood's love affair with franchises and comic book movies. What sets this book part from all the other Hollywood books? I'm dealing with recent history and movies folks may have heard of, using these films as a window into examining the Hollywood machine at work, from script development and production to marketing and distribution, as studios decide on their release strategies, schmooze with media influencers, and face the myriad challenges now facing the industry, including declining DVD sales, soaring production and marketing costs, escalating box office ticket prices, shorter exhibition windows, and the incredible impact of the digital revolution-from 3D to VOD and IMAX. How can I buy it? You can pre-order the book at  Amazon, iBookstore, Barnes & Noble, Indiebound, Books-A-Million , or Google, or you can ask your local independent bookstore to order it. The publisher is HarperCollins and the ISBN-13 is: 9780062218018. More info on the book (http://www.harpercollins.com/books/11-Billion-Year-Anne-Thompson/?isbn=9780062218032). How can I order a copy for possible review or interview? You can contact HarperCollins publicity manager Joseph Papa at Joseph.Papa@HARPERCOLLINS.com. Can I book a Q & A or book signing or a 2012 flick at a movie theater or bookstore? Sure, contact Joseph. I hope you like the book. It's a picture of my world.
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As some of you may have gleaned, I've written my first book. Finally.

The book is "The $11 Billion Year: From Sundance to the Oscars, an Inside Look at the Changing Hollywood System" and will be published by Newmarket Press for It Books/an imprint of HarperCollins, on March 4. I'm putting together various book signings, talks and parties in New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles, among other places, in the coming months. Stay tuned for details.

Why did I write this?

Inspired by William Goldman's classic book, "The Season," about one year on Broadway, I have long wanted to write an in-depth, informed chronicle of what goes on within one year inside the motion picture industry from my reporter's point of view. I believed it could provide insights and a behind-the-scenes perspective on every aspect of the business of movies like no other book had done before. The 2012 slate provided me the perfect opportunity to take on this challenge, resulting in "The $11 Billion Year." It was tough.

Is it a business book?

It's like the blog-it's intended to inform smart film lovers about the inner workings of the movie industry. In nine chapters-plus an afterword, photo insert, glossary, and box office charts I follow the transformative year 2012, from the Sundance Film Festival to the Oscars, just as I covered it here, but with more more in-depth reporting. I show how the global business of Hollywood really works by detailing the making and marketing of movies, from low-budget indies to studio blockbusters, the players, winners, and losers.

Starting at Sundance in January, I follow the eventual nine Best Picture contenders through their long road to the Oscars. I cover the indies and their new distribution models at Sundance. Why did "Beasts of the Southern Wild" become the darling of the festival? What might the exhibitors' jockeying at Cinema-Con, the studio summer tentpole showcases at Comic-Con and the fall's "smart" films and BIG films of the holiday season introduced at Telluride, Toronto, and New York Festivals have to do with making or breaking a film's chances? How did Harvey Weinstein's maneuvers at the international scene at Cannes benefit "Django Unchained" and "Silver Linings Playbook"? Looking at "Zero Dark Thirty," how are women filmmakers and movies about women faring, are things improving? I show the the glamour of the Oscars. Why did "Argo" beat "Lincoln" for Best Picture?

What are the nine movies?

"Beasts of the Southern Wild," "Amour," "Life of Pi," "Lincoln," "Silver Linings Playbook," "Zero Dark Thirty," "Django Unchained," "Les Miserables," and "Argo." Plus a look at some Oscar-bound documentaries and foreign films and Hollywood's love affair with franchises and comic book movies.

What sets this book part from all the other Hollywood books?

I'm dealing with recent history and movies folks may have heard of, using these films as a window into examining the Hollywood machine at work, from script development and production to marketing and distribution, as studios decide on their release strategies, schmooze with media influencers, and face the myriad challenges now facing the industry, including declining DVD sales, soaring production and marketing costs, escalating box office ticket prices, shorter exhibition windows, and the incredible impact of the digital revolution-from 3D to VOD and IMAX.

How can I buy it?

You can pre-order the book at  Amazon, iBookstore, Barnes & Noble, Indiebound, Books-A-Million , or Google, or you can ask your local independent bookstore to order it. The publisher is HarperCollins and the ISBN-13 is: 9780062218018. More info on the book (http://www.harpercollins.com/books/11-Billion-Year-Anne-Thompson/?isbn=9780062218032).

How can I order a copy for possible review or interview?

You can contact HarperCollins publicity manager Joseph Papa at Joseph.Papa@HARPERCOLLINS.com.

Can I book a Q & A or book signing or a 2012 flick at a movie theater or bookstore?

Sure, contact Joseph.

I hope you like the book. It's a picture of my world.

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Picasa Collier's Weekly - "Of the Southern Wild" "When it all goes quiet behind my eyes, I see everything ..." ~ Beasts of the Southern Wild
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Collier's Weekly - "Of the Southern Wild"

"When it all goes quiet behind my eyes, I see everything ..." ~ Beasts of the Southern Wild

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Picasa Beasts Of The Southern Wild - 2012
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Beasts Of The Southern Wild - 2012
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Picasa JLaw, Justin, and Miley Make Forbes 30 Under 30 List for 2014 -Forbes Magazine announced their 30 Under 30 list and it is filled with young entertainers. Jennifer Lawrence, Miley Cyrus, Justin Bieber, Katy Perry, Lady Gaga, Bruno Mars and Lorde are among those named by experts in 15 different fields.  Beasts of the Southern Wild actress Quvenzhane Wallis was the youngest on the list – she is only 10 years old!
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JLaw, Justin, and Miley Make Forbes 30 Under 30 List for 2014 -Forbes Magazine announced their 30 Under 30 list and it is filled with young entertainers. Jennifer Lawrence, Miley Cyrus, Justin Bieber, Katy Perry, Lady Gaga, Bruno Mars and Lorde are among those named by experts in 15 different fields.  Beasts of the Southern Wild actress Quvenzhane Wallis was the youngest on the list – she is only 10 years old!
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Picasa The final screenings in our International Film Series - Beasts of the Southern Wild. See it for free tonight on the Watauga Campus at 5:30p in Room 106 and again next week at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center in Lenoir on Nov. 12 at 7:15p. See you there!
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The final screenings in our International Film Series - Beasts of the Southern Wild. See it for free tonight on the Watauga Campus at 5:30p in Room 106 and again next week at the J.E. Broyhill Civic Center in Lenoir on Nov. 12 at 7:15p. See you there!
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Picasa "For every tent pole being built pixel by pixel in a Hollywood Laboratory, there is a young filmmaker like Benh Zeitlin going into the bathtub of New Orleans with a small cast and crew and a 16MM camera to create a uniquely personal vision. “Beasts of the Southern Wild” found its way all the way to the White House and to the Oscars. For every sequel that’s being churned out, there is something new and original fighting to be born. It’s never been harder and it’s never been easier. I guess it’s been like that all along." - Jon Kilik, Producer
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"For every tent pole being built pixel by pixel in a Hollywood Laboratory, there is a young filmmaker like Benh Zeitlin going into the bathtub of New Orleans with a small cast and crew and a 16MM camera to create a uniquely personal vision. “Beasts of the Southern Wild” found its way all the way to the White House and to the Oscars. For every sequel that’s being churned out, there is something new and original fighting to be born. It’s never been harder and it’s never been easier. I guess it’s been like that all along." - Jon Kilik, Producer
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