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Picasa Hushpuppy and Wink "Beasts of the Southern Wild"
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Picasa Oscars Best Picture: 7 Underdogs That Could Benefit from Preferential Ballot All hope isn’t lost for “American Sniper.” Even though the Bradley Cooper drama about Navy SEAL Chris Kyle hasn’t leapt into the award season race yet, it still holds a stealth advantage as it enters Oscar balloting — passionate fans. The Golden Globe nominees (announced on Thursday) and SAG Awards (Wednesday) don’t necessarily take passion into account. But the Academy Award nominating system for best picture, determined by a preferential ballot (that puts more “weight” on a film ranked as No. 1 by a voter), can help out a movie like “Sniper,” which has ardent groupies. In recent years, films such as “A Serious Man,” “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close,” “District 9,” “Tree of Life,” “Toy Story 3″ and “Amour” were nominated in the top Oscar category because their fans loved them in a fanatical way. Here are seven filmsthat could benefit from a similar surge this year. 1. “Unbroken” Angelina Jolie has been campaigning like Hillary Clinton for her World War II drama about Louis Zamperini, but the Globes and SAG snubbed “Unbroken” in all categories. The Academy, on the other hand, may not. Actors love to celebrate actors who direct — see Ben Affleck (“Argo”), Warren Beatty (“Reds”), George Clooney (“Good Night, and Good Luck“) and Kevin Costner (“Dances With Wolves”), which is why “Unbroken” will still probably be among the 10 (or fewer) nominees for best picture. But Jolie’s odds of cracking the best director race have dimmed as a result of mixed reviews. 2. “American Sniper” The Academy has been less excited about some of Clint Eastwood’s recent projects — like “Gran Torino,” “Hereafter” and “J. Edgar” — compared to his earlier work as a director. But “American Sniper” is his best film since “Million Dollar Baby,” and there’s a lot of enthusiasm for Bradley Cooper’s astonishing transformation. He’s almost unrecognizable in the role that required him to pack on 40 pounds and train like a real Navy SEAL. It’s a mystery why the Hollywood Foreign Press overlooked the film, but it may have to do with the fact that foreign journalists didn’t want to honor a movie that champions the U.S. military (that could also explain “Unbroken’s” snub). In 2006 “Munich” didn’t get much Golden Globes support either, but still earned five Oscar nominations, including for best picture. 3. “Whiplash” Until now, the only awards season love for “Whiplash” has been for best supporting actor J.K. Simmons. But at Academy events, informal polls show that Academy voters are very high on the movie — it’s about a disciplined performer, after all (Miles Teller as a professional drummer) — making it a likely bet for best picture. The director race is crowded, but if voters make room for a prodigy, they could award a surprise nomination to Damien Chazelle, like they did in 2013 for Benh Zeitlin (“Beasts of the Southern Wild”). 4. “Wild” This adaption of Cheryl Strayed’s hiking memoir isn’t just a vehicle for Reese Witherspoon. Academy voters awarded Jean-Marc Vallee’s last picture, “Dallas Buyers Club,” with six Oscar nominations, and “Wild” could make a surprise last-minute sprint in categories like best picture and adapted screenplay. And don’t count out Laura Dern, who was snubbed for best-supporting actress by SAG and the Golden Globes. There’s plenty of goodwill for the once-child actress in the Academy—and she’s overdue since she’s been nominated for an Oscar only once (1992’s “Rambling Rose”). 5. “Inherent Vice” Depending on whom you talk to, Paul Thomas Anderson’s latest, based on the Thomas Pynchon novel about a pothead private detective (Joaquin Phoenix), is either a riot or an incoherent bore. Many Academy voters probably fall in the latter category, but one can never underestimate Anderson’s popularity with the actors branch. If enough of them put this film in the No. 1 spot on their ballots, it could eke its way into the expanded best picture race. 6. “Nightcrawler” Jake Gyllenhaal’s haunting performance as an L.A. crime paparazzo, for which he lost 30 pounds, landed him acting noms from both the Golden Globes and SAG this week, and he’s inching his way closer to his first lead actor Oscar nomination (he was previously nominated in supporting for 2005’s “Brokeback Mountain”). “Nightcrawler” has a passionate fanbase: I think it will be one of the best picture nominees. And if there are any surprises in best supporting actress, Rene Russo could (and should) be in the mix for playing a TV news executive. 7. “Interstellar” Christopher Nolan hasn’t had a great track record with the Academy — the reason we have extra best picture nominees is that 2008’s “The Dark Knight” didn’t make the cut — but he rebounded as 2010’s “Inception” with eight nominations. On paper,  “Interstellar” would would seem his most Academy-friendly film: It’s a parable about love between a father (Matthew McConaughey) and his daughter; its bittersweet ending is reminiscent of “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” etc. Even if Academy voters have a phobia about special effects, at least one of the best picture nominees is going to need to be a hit. Given all the tears at the New York premiere last month, there’s still a chance “Interstellar” could take off this award season. posted by www.exhibeflix.com
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Oscars Best Picture: 7 Underdogs That Could Benefit from Preferential Ballot

All hope isn’t lost for “American Sniper.” Even though the Bradley Cooper drama about Navy SEAL Chris Kyle hasn’t leapt into the award season race yet, it still holds a stealth advantage as it enters Oscar balloting — passionate fans.

The Golden Globe nominees (announced on Thursday) and SAG Awards (Wednesday) don’t necessarily take passion into account. But the Academy Award nominating system for best picture, determined by a preferential ballot (that puts more “weight” on a film ranked as No. 1 by a voter), can help out a movie like “Sniper,” which has ardent groupies. In recent years, films such as “A Serious Man,” “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close,” “District 9,” “Tree of Life,” “Toy Story 3″ and “Amour” were nominated in the top Oscar category because their fans loved them in a fanatical way.

Here are seven filmsthat could benefit from a similar surge this year.

1. “Unbroken”
Angelina Jolie has been campaigning like Hillary Clinton for her World War II drama about Louis Zamperini, but the Globes and SAG snubbed “Unbroken” in all categories. The Academy, on the other hand, may not. Actors love to celebrate actors who direct — see Ben Affleck (“Argo”), Warren Beatty (“Reds”), George Clooney (“Good Night, and Good Luck“) and Kevin Costner (“Dances With Wolves”), which is why “Unbroken” will still probably be among the 10 (or fewer) nominees for best picture. But Jolie’s odds of cracking the best director race have dimmed as a result of mixed reviews.

2. “American Sniper”
The Academy has been less excited about some of Clint Eastwood’s recent projects — like “Gran Torino,” “Hereafter” and “J. Edgar” — compared to his earlier work as a director. But “American Sniper” is his best film since “Million Dollar Baby,” and there’s a lot of enthusiasm for Bradley Cooper’s astonishing transformation. He’s almost unrecognizable in the role that required him to pack on 40 pounds and train like a real Navy SEAL. It’s a mystery why the Hollywood Foreign Press overlooked the film, but it may have to do with the fact that foreign journalists didn’t want to honor a movie that champions the U.S. military (that could also explain “Unbroken’s” snub). In 2006 “Munich” didn’t get much Golden Globes support either, but still earned five Oscar nominations, including for best picture.

3. “Whiplash”
Until now, the only awards season love for “Whiplash” has been for best supporting actor J.K. Simmons. But at Academy events, informal polls show that Academy voters are very high on the movie — it’s about a disciplined performer, after all (Miles Teller as a professional drummer) — making it a likely bet for best picture. The director race is crowded, but if voters make room for a prodigy, they could award a surprise nomination to Damien Chazelle, like they did in 2013 for Benh Zeitlin (“Beasts of the Southern Wild”).

4. “Wild”
This adaption of Cheryl Strayed’s hiking memoir isn’t just a vehicle for Reese Witherspoon. Academy voters awarded Jean-Marc Vallee’s last picture, “Dallas Buyers Club,” with six Oscar nominations, and “Wild” could make a surprise last-minute sprint in categories like best picture and adapted screenplay. And don’t count out Laura Dern, who was snubbed for best-supporting actress by SAG and the Golden Globes. There’s plenty of goodwill for the once-child actress in the Academy—and she’s overdue since she’s been nominated for an Oscar only once (1992’s “Rambling Rose”).

5. “Inherent Vice”
Depending on whom you talk to, Paul Thomas Anderson’s latest, based on the Thomas Pynchon novel about a pothead private detective (Joaquin Phoenix), is either a riot or an incoherent bore. Many Academy voters probably fall in the latter category, but one can never underestimate Anderson’s popularity with the actors branch. If enough of them put this film in the No. 1 spot on their ballots, it could eke its way into the expanded best picture race.

6. “Nightcrawler”
Jake Gyllenhaal’s haunting performance as an L.A. crime paparazzo, for which he lost 30 pounds, landed him acting noms from both the Golden Globes and SAG this week, and he’s inching his way closer to his first lead actor Oscar nomination (he was previously nominated in supporting for 2005’s “Brokeback Mountain”). “Nightcrawler” has a passionate fanbase: I think it will be one of the best picture nominees. And if there are any surprises in best supporting actress, Rene Russo could (and should) be in the mix for playing a TV news executive.

7. “Interstellar”
Christopher Nolan hasn’t had a great track record with the Academy — the reason we have extra best picture nominees is that 2008’s “The Dark Knight” didn’t make the cut — but he rebounded as 2010’s “Inception” with eight nominations. On paper,  “Interstellar” would would seem his most Academy-friendly film: It’s a parable about love between a father (Matthew McConaughey) and his daughter; its bittersweet ending is reminiscent of “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” etc. Even if Academy voters have a phobia about special effects, at least one of the best picture nominees is going to need to be a hit. Given all the tears at the New York premiere last month, there’s still a chance “Interstellar” could take off this award season.

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Picasa Sugar, Spice and Guts Representation of Female Characters in Movies Is Improving Girls grow up on big and little screens, and sometimes the thinking about girls and girlhood grows, too. Inspired by Richard Linklater’s “Boyhood” — a magnificent film that tells the story of a boy’s life from 6 to 18 — we are taking a look at how girls are growing up in the movies. American mainstream cinema, a timid enterprise dependent on formulas and genres, can be mind-blowingly retrograde when it comes to women and girls. And while an occasional woman or girl rules the box office, too many of their on-screen sisters are sidelined or just left out of the picture. Characters like Katniss Everdeen are changing girlhood and challenging tired stereotypes by not waiting for some guy to save the day: They’re saving themselves and their worlds, too. Yet Katniss, her screen sisters and the industry have a very long way to go. In one study the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media looked at 5,554 “distinct speaking characters” in 122 family movies rated G, PG or PG-13 that were released between 2006 and 2009. The institute discovered that only 29.2 percent of those roles were female, while a whopping 70.8 percent were male. In other words, there were 2.42 male characters for every female one. Put another way, there was Harry and Ron and then there was Hermione, the smartest girl in the class. Hermione ruled, but not nearly enough. In the past, some actresses had a measure of power or at least staying power in Hollywood, but too many more were typecast as bratty sisters, dutiful daughters or sexpots, and then cast aside. And some of their most memorable characters were, like their adult counterparts, defined by hypersexuality or asexuality. Such was the case in 1962, when Dolores Haze, better known as Lolita, was the barely pubescent object of her stepfather’s lust in Stanley Kubrick’s adaptation of the notorious Nabokov novel. That same year, Scout Finch was the object of her father’s moral instruction in the movie version of “To Kill a Mockingbird.” A year later, Betty Friedan’s “The Feminine Mystique” rocked the country, becoming a best-selling portent of second-wave feminism. What has changed in the years since? Quite a lot off screen, if not nearly enough on: Nymphets and tomboys still show up, as do brainy, funny, scary and tough girls. The picture of girlhood at the movies has become an increasingly diverse, sometimes contradictory array of identities, including bold revisions of age-old archetypes and brave new heroines. That said, the faces of these girls remain exasperatingly monochromatic. So all hail Quvenzhané Wallis, who after leading the charge (and earning an Oscar nod) in “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” appears in December as Little Orphan Annie in a remake of the 1982 movie musical. The sun will come out tomorrow — but this time so will the daughter. Here, we take a look at some of the other pixies and powerhouses who are also changing movie girlhood. THE WARRIORS Katniss Everdeen, who returns this fall in “Mockingjay — Part 1,” the third installment in the “Hunger Games” franchise, is so cool, so capable, so focused, with her archer’s eye, on the task in front of her that it’s easy to lose sight of just how revolutionary she is. Not only in the dystopian fictional universe she inhabits, where she has been radicalized by the cruelty of the Hunger Games and the iniquity of the society that supports them. In the world of mass entertainment, too, Katniss is a transformative figure: a solitary warrior, a heroine whose personal struggles for survival and dignity are joined to a larger fight for justice. And also, as played by Jennifer Lawrence, a potent force at the global box office — a blockbuster Joan of Arc. On the movie landscape, Katniss is not entirely alone, though she is still very much outnumbered. In recent years, there have been a handful of movies about young women who can throw a punch, land a kick and run like the wind, girls who are more than sidekicks or pneumatic eye candy. Shailene Woodley’s Tris Prior in “Divergent” — another crossover from the fertile world of young-adult dystopian literature — is, like Katniss, a fighter against corrupt authority. In Joe Wright’s “Hanna” (2011), Saoirse Ronan is a big-eyed, sweet-faced killer, trained in combat by her father. In the culty “Kick-Ass” movies, Chloë Grace Moretz portrays the fearless Hit Girl with a foul mouth and an appetite for combat. The violence there was played partly for laughs and shock value, making the most of the incongruity between the cuteness of the actress and the viciousness of the character, but it also tapped into a deep reservoir of restlessness and rage. For most of movie history — from the old westerns to “Thelma & Louise” by way of exploitation gore-fests like “I Spit on Your Grave” — women’s violence could be justified by narrowly defined motives of self-defense or revenge. The broader battle between right and wrong — and also the pleasure of action for its own sake — have typically been male prerogatives, handed down over the decades from gunslingers to superheroes. The comic-book fraternity has been slow to admit women as full members. Ms. Lawrence has made an impression as the blue-skinned, shape-shifting Mystique (a role originated by Rebecca Romijn-Stamos), but her team is still called the X-Men for a reason. And if women can fight their way toward parity, it will be Katniss who blazed the trail. A.O. SCOTT THE NEW SEARCHERS Journey is one of the most overused words in movie-speak. One reason are guides like “Save the Cat! The Last Book on Screenwriting That You’ll Ever Need!” that borrow heavily from Joseph Campbell, who wrote that whether the hero is “ridiculous or sublime, Greek or barbarian, gentile or Jew, his journey varies little in essential plan.” Too bad that in Campbell’s “monomyth” that journey is also unequivocally male: “The woman is life, the hero its knower and master.” The classic trip has been so historically male that one critic, Eric Leed, gave it a biological spin, labeling it a “spermatic journey.” Never mind that every so often a girl or woman — Dorothy, Thelma, Louise or Hushpuppy — hits the road. She gets out of the house and, like a footloose Penelope, weaves an adventure instead of a shroud. The truth is that women were on the move in movies before talkies, in serials like “The Perils of Pauline” (1914) and westerns like “The Covered Wagon” (1923). Although girls tend to experience more domestic exploits, a few second-wave feminist girls did get out and about, including in “Paper Moon” (1973) and the original “True Grit” (1969). In recent decades, the movie industry hasn’t been much interested in women and girls, so it hasn’t created all that many female-driven escapades. Yet the emergence of new peripatetic girls and women who voyage with purpose and goals — in the latest “True Grit,” “Winter’s Bone,” “Beasts of the Southern Wild” and the coming “Tracks” (Sept. 19) — suggests that our movies may be finally catching up to female Americans on the move. MANOHLA DARGIS SCREAM TEENS Movies have long embraced young freaks and ghouls, those teenage werewolves and other children of the damned, and, in recent years, the young adult book market has helped pump fresh hot blood into the screen. The horror genre goes so well with the adolescent body, after all, both fertile sites churning with strange liquids, violent passions and seemingly inexplicable, terrifying changes. “I want to be normal,” says the spectacularly paranormal Carrie (Chloë Grace Moretz) in the recent remake of the 1976 Brian De Palma freak-out. There’s no chance of normal for Carrie, no matter her era, or for the title character in “Life After Beth,” a young zombie (Aubrey Plaza) whose morbid resurrection turns her into the ultimate clingy girlfriend. “I kind of wish she’d stay dead,” her boyfriend says with a sigh. Having a monster for a boyfriend has metaphoric potential, but it’s also true that these days it’s harder for a white girl to hook up with a black guy than it is to get serious with a super-white vampire (“Twilight”) or suck face with a deadly white zombie (“Warm Bodies”). The Production Code’s ban on “sex relationships between the white and black races” ended in 1956, but in today’s neo-segregationist cinema, blacks and whites rarely mix romantically. So while “Twilight” introduced a Native American heartthrob with Jacob the wolf boy, Bella was always destined to remain on Team Edward. Given our black-and-white obsession with race, it’s no wonder that in the 2013 Southern gothic “Beautiful Creatures” a teenage witch who learns that “no good could come from us loving a mortal.” MANOHLA DARGIS ONCE UPON A TIME RIGHT NOW Disney has been banking on princesses since Snow White warbled “Someday My Prince Will Come” in 1937. Decades later, its sagging fortunes were lifted in 1989 by the animated Ariel, a.k.a. the Little Mermaid, an undersea princess who paved the way for the tiara-wearing likes of Belle, Jasmine and Tiana. In 2000, the company created Disney Princess, what it called a “young girls’ lifestyle brand” that brought together eight of its actual and honorary princesses under one “marketing umbrella.” Since then more princesses have been gathered under that parasol, including Merida from Pixar’s first female-driven movie, “Brave” (2012). Disney bought Pixar in 2006, and it’s hard not to wonder if Pixar’s run of male-driven hits didn’t play into Disney’s fleeting concerns about the whole princess thing. Some of that unease was apparent in Disney’s titling of “Rapunzel,” which it renamed “Tangled” because, according to a 2010 article in The Los Angeles Times, company suits believed — after the disappointing box office returns of “The Princess and the Frog” (2009) — that boys didn’t want to see a movie with “princess” in the title. Maybe not, but to judge by that billion-dollar juggernaut called “Frozen,”
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Sugar, Spice and Guts

Representation of Female Characters in Movies Is Improving

Girls grow up on big and little screens, and sometimes the thinking about girls and girlhood grows, too. Inspired by Richard Linklater’s “Boyhood” — a magnificent film that tells the story of a boy’s life from 6 to 18 — we are taking a look at how girls are growing up in the movies. American mainstream cinema, a timid enterprise dependent on formulas and genres, can be mind-blowingly retrograde when it comes to women and girls. And while an occasional woman or girl rules the box office, too many of their on-screen sisters are sidelined or just left out of the picture.

Characters like Katniss Everdeen are changing girlhood and challenging tired stereotypes by not waiting for some guy to save the day: They’re saving themselves and their worlds, too. Yet Katniss, her screen sisters and the industry have a very long way to go. In one study the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media looked at 5,554 “distinct speaking characters” in 122 family movies rated G, PG or PG-13 that were released between 2006 and 2009. The institute discovered that only 29.2 percent of those roles were female, while a whopping 70.8 percent were male. In other words, there were 2.42 male characters for every female one. Put another way, there was Harry and Ron and then there was Hermione, the smartest girl in the class. Hermione ruled, but not nearly enough.

In the past, some actresses had a measure of power or at least staying power in Hollywood, but too many more were typecast as bratty sisters, dutiful daughters or sexpots, and then cast aside. And some of their most memorable characters were, like their adult counterparts, defined by hypersexuality or asexuality. Such was the case in 1962, when Dolores Haze, better known as Lolita, was the barely pubescent object of her stepfather’s lust in Stanley Kubrick’s adaptation of the notorious Nabokov novel. That same year, Scout Finch was the object of her father’s moral instruction in the movie version of “To Kill a Mockingbird.” A year later, Betty Friedan’s “The Feminine Mystique” rocked the country, becoming a best-selling portent of second-wave feminism.

What has changed in the years since? Quite a lot off screen, if not nearly enough on: Nymphets and tomboys still show up, as do brainy, funny, scary and tough girls. The picture of girlhood at the movies has become an increasingly diverse, sometimes contradictory array of identities, including bold revisions of age-old archetypes and brave new heroines. That said, the faces of these girls remain exasperatingly monochromatic. So all hail Quvenzhané Wallis, who after leading the charge (and earning an Oscar nod) in “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” appears in December as Little Orphan Annie in a remake of the 1982 movie musical. The sun will come out tomorrow — but this time so will the daughter. Here, we take a look at some of the other pixies and powerhouses who are also changing movie girlhood.

THE WARRIORS

Katniss Everdeen, who returns this fall in “Mockingjay — Part 1,” the third installment in the “Hunger Games” franchise, is so cool, so capable, so focused, with her archer’s eye, on the task in front of her that it’s easy to lose sight of just how revolutionary she is. Not only in the dystopian fictional universe she inhabits, where she has been radicalized by the cruelty of the Hunger Games and the iniquity of the society that supports them. In the world of mass entertainment, too, Katniss is a transformative figure: a solitary warrior, a heroine whose personal struggles for survival and dignity are joined to a larger fight for justice. And also, as played by Jennifer Lawrence, a potent force at the global box office — a blockbuster Joan of Arc.

On the movie landscape, Katniss is not entirely alone, though she is still very much outnumbered. In recent years, there have been a handful of movies about young women who can throw a punch, land a kick and run like the wind, girls who are more than sidekicks or pneumatic eye candy. Shailene Woodley’s Tris Prior in “Divergent” — another crossover from the fertile world of young-adult dystopian literature — is, like Katniss, a fighter against corrupt authority. In Joe Wright’s “Hanna” (2011), Saoirse Ronan is a big-eyed, sweet-faced killer, trained in combat by her father. In the culty “Kick-Ass” movies, Chloë Grace Moretz portrays the fearless Hit Girl with a foul mouth and an appetite for combat.

The violence there was played partly for laughs and shock value, making the most of the incongruity between the cuteness of the actress and the viciousness of the character, but it also tapped into a deep reservoir of restlessness and rage. For most of movie history — from the old westerns to “Thelma & Louise” by way of exploitation gore-fests like “I Spit on Your Grave” — women’s violence could be justified by narrowly defined motives of self-defense or revenge. The broader battle between right and wrong — and also the pleasure of action for its own sake — have typically been male prerogatives, handed down over the decades from gunslingers to superheroes.

The comic-book fraternity has been slow to admit women as full members. Ms. Lawrence has made an impression as the blue-skinned, shape-shifting Mystique (a role originated by Rebecca Romijn-Stamos), but her team is still called the X-Men for a reason. And if women can fight their way toward parity, it will be Katniss who blazed the trail. A.O. SCOTT

THE NEW SEARCHERS

Journey is one of the most overused words in movie-speak. One reason are guides like “Save the Cat! The Last Book on Screenwriting That You’ll Ever Need!” that borrow heavily from Joseph Campbell, who wrote that whether the hero is “ridiculous or sublime, Greek or barbarian, gentile or Jew, his journey varies little in essential plan.” Too bad that in Campbell’s “monomyth” that journey is also unequivocally male: “The woman is life, the hero its knower and master.” The classic trip has been so historically male that one critic, Eric Leed, gave it a biological spin, labeling it a “spermatic journey.” Never mind that every so often a girl or woman — Dorothy, Thelma, Louise or Hushpuppy — hits the road. She gets out of the house and, like a footloose Penelope, weaves an adventure instead of a shroud.

The truth is that women were on the move in movies before talkies, in serials like “The Perils of Pauline” (1914) and westerns like “The Covered Wagon” (1923). Although girls tend to experience more domestic exploits, a few second-wave feminist girls did get out and about, including in “Paper Moon” (1973) and the original “True Grit” (1969). In recent decades, the movie industry hasn’t been much interested in women and girls, so it hasn’t created all that many female-driven escapades. Yet the emergence of new peripatetic girls and women who voyage with purpose and goals — in the latest “True Grit,” “Winter’s Bone,” “Beasts of the Southern Wild” and the coming “Tracks” (Sept. 19) — suggests that our movies may be finally catching up to female Americans on the move. MANOHLA DARGIS

SCREAM TEENS

Movies have long embraced young freaks and ghouls, those teenage werewolves and other children of the damned, and, in recent years, the young adult book market has helped pump fresh hot blood into the screen. The horror genre goes so well with the adolescent body, after all, both fertile sites churning with strange liquids, violent passions and seemingly inexplicable, terrifying changes. “I want to be normal,” says the spectacularly paranormal Carrie (Chloë Grace Moretz) in the recent remake of the 1976 Brian De Palma freak-out. There’s no chance of normal for Carrie, no matter her era, or for the title character in “Life After Beth,” a young zombie (Aubrey Plaza) whose morbid resurrection turns her into the ultimate clingy girlfriend. “I kind of wish she’d stay dead,” her boyfriend says with a sigh.

Having a monster for a boyfriend has metaphoric potential, but it’s also true that these days it’s harder for a white girl to hook up with a black guy than it is to get serious with a super-white vampire (“Twilight”) or suck face with a deadly white zombie (“Warm Bodies”). The Production Code’s ban on “sex relationships between the white and black races” ended in 1956, but in today’s neo-segregationist cinema, blacks and whites rarely mix romantically. So while “Twilight” introduced a Native American heartthrob with Jacob the wolf boy, Bella was always destined to remain on Team Edward. Given our black-and-white obsession with race, it’s no wonder that in the 2013 Southern gothic “Beautiful Creatures” a teenage witch who learns that “no good could come from us loving a mortal.”
MANOHLA DARGIS

ONCE UPON A TIME RIGHT NOW

Disney has been banking on princesses since Snow White warbled “Someday My Prince Will Come” in 1937. Decades later, its sagging fortunes were lifted in 1989 by the animated Ariel, a.k.a. the Little Mermaid, an undersea princess who paved the way for the tiara-wearing likes of Belle, Jasmine and Tiana. In 2000, the company created Disney Princess, what it called a “young girls’ lifestyle brand” that brought together eight of its actual and honorary princesses under one “marketing umbrella.” Since then more princesses have been gathered under that parasol, including Merida from Pixar’s first female-driven movie, “Brave” (2012). Disney bought Pixar in 2006, and it’s hard not to wonder if Pixar’s run of male-driven hits didn’t play into Disney’s fleeting concerns about the whole princess thing.

Some of that unease was apparent in Disney’s titling of “Rapunzel,” which it renamed “Tangled” because, according to a 2010 article in The Los Angeles Times, company suits believed — after the disappointing box office returns of “The Princess and the Frog” (2009) — that boys didn’t want to see a movie with “princess” in the title. Maybe not, but to judge by that billion-dollar juggernaut called “Frozen,”

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Picasa Making History With ‘Selma,’ Ava DuVernay Seeks a Different Equality On a swampy afternoon in late June, the director Ava DuVernay stood not far from the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., that haunted place where, President Lyndon B. Johnson told the country, history and fate met. She was instructing a group of white extras on all the ugly things she wanted them to yell at the several hundred black extras snaking across the bridge, part of a sizable army of cast and crew that had been gathered together for “Selma,” her new movie about the campaign for black voter rights. That day, Ms. DuVernay was restaging Bloody Sunday, March 7, 1965, when the police violently attacked marchers trying to walk to Montgomery, where they would eventually hear the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s call out to the world: “How long? Not long! Because the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.” A centrifugal force, Ms. DuVernay rarely seemed to stop moving. As she called “Action!,” and people and horses began to run, smoke flooding the air, it was thrilling to witness a female director bring this agonizing American story to life and, in the process, stake her own claim on our cultural history. Ms. DuVernay, 42, belongs to what she calls “a small sorority” of black female filmmakers, who are part of another modest American sisterhood: female directors of any color. And with “Selma,” she has done what few female directors get the opportunity to do, which is go large — with politics and history — with a decent budget and serious muscle. Paramount Pictures is releasing the movie on Dec. 25, and the producers include Oprah Winfrey, who has a small role in the movie as an activist, and Plan B, Brad Pitt’s company. Four years ago, Kathryn Bigelow became the first woman to win an Academy Award as best director; Ms. DuVernay has a shot to become the second. Like many, I had hoped Ms. Bigelow’s Oscar for “The Hurt Locker” would be transformative, and that soon female directors would be accepted as equal to men, and, crucially, hired as equals. But that hasn’t happened. In 2009, when “The Hurt Locker” was released, women made up 7 percent of the directors on the top 250 domestic grossing films, according to an annual report by the researcher Martha M. Lauzen. As of early December, by my count, only 19 women — 7.6 percent — were directors on the top 250 grossing features released this year. “Selma” may increase that percentage, as might another big-studio release, Angelina Jolie’s “Unbroken,” about the Olympic runner and war prisoner Louis Zamperini. It will take more than these two filmmakers to disrupt the industry’s sexism, which has long shut women out from directing movies and, increasingly, shuts them out on screen, too. Notably, Ms. DuVernay and Ms. Jolie, having made movies about women, have now made the leap to bigger stakes with stories centered on men. I hope their movies burn up the box office, but I also hope they return to movies about women. We need those stories, and these days, female directors are often the only ones interested in them. Gender equality is an undeniable imperative. But it’s also essential to the future of the movies: This American art became great with stories about men and women, not just a superhero and some token chick. Ms. DuVernay’s path to “Selma” is unusual, not only because she belongs to a small sorority, but also because she came to directing through publicity. After graduating from the University of California, Los Angeles (she majored in English and African-American studies), she had a flirtation with broadcast journalism before landing a publicity job. At 27, she founded her own agency, working on movies by the likes of Steven Spielberg, which embedded her in every stage of the movie process, all the way to award shows. She was on the set of “Collateral” (2004) the moment that she realized what she wanted. “I just remember standing there in the middle of the night in East L.A. and watching Michael Mann direct and thinking, ‘I have stories,’ ” she said. “That was the moment I thought: ‘Wow, I could do this. I would like to do that.’ ” She narrated this origin story back home in Los Angeles in September, as we talked in her house, a midcentury perch overlooking Beachwood Canyon with a view of the Hollywood sign. Hours earlier, she had, in the fashion of 21st century cinema, delivered her cut of “Selma” through a high-speed file transfer. Now people whose opinions mattered — including the producers on the Paramount lot a few miles away and the famous one in Chicago (“Ms. Winfrey,” as Ms. DuVernay calls her) — were looking at “Selma” for the first time. “Your foot is shaking,” I said. “Are you nervous?” Ms. DuVernay radiates terrific self-confidence, but I assumed that she was anxious. “No,” she shot back. With its $20 million production budget and the support of a major studio, “Selma” is far bigger than any of Ms. DuVernay’s previous movies. She made her last one, “Middle of Nowhere,” for $200,000. A small-scale, lapidary drama about a woman finding love, though mostly herself, it was beautifully shot by the cinematographer Bradford Young. (They reunited for “Selma.”) It was well received at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival, but, like the rest of the entries that year, it was overshadowed by the juggernaut known as “Beasts of the Southern Wild.” Ms. DuVernay became the first black woman to win the dramatic directing award at Sundance, and while that was gratifying, it didn’t translate into any immediate gains. “No one offered me anything,” she said matter-of-factly. This is in stark contrast with what happened to Colin Trevorrow, whose first feature, “Safety Not Guaranteed,” was also at the 2012 festival. In what has become a familiar story of male success, he went on to direct the relaunch of a franchise behemoth, “Jurassic World.” Women rarely receive those kinds of big breaks. The director Mimi Leder (“Deep Impact”) and the writer Linda Woolverton (“Maleficent”) have made a lot of money for the industry, but they recently told me they, too, don’t get the calls that you might expect. That no one clamored to hire Ms. DuVernay is even less a surprise given the segregation of American cinema and an industry mind-set that deems that a movie with two black leads is no longer simply a movie but a black movie. Ms. DuVernay started directing first in documentary where budgets tend to be low, and you don’t necessarily need to ask anyone’s permission, two reasons so many women may gravitate to the field. She made her first feature, “This Is the Life” (2008), a documentary about a Los Angeles hip-hop scene, for $10,000: check to check as she put it. She subsequently took $50,000 that she had saved to buy a house and used it to make her first dramatic feature, “I Will Follow” (2010), an autobiographical tale about a niece mourning an aunt. Ms. DuVernay released the movie through a distribution company she founded (she’s a busy woman) and sank $100,000 of the profits into “Middle of Nowhere.” Through it all she kept her day job, which is how she came to “Selma.” In January 2010, The Daily News in New York ran an item about the script, by Paul Webb, and a scene in which Dr. King flirts with a prostitute or, as The News put it, “MLK Flick has Tryst Issues.” (There’s no such scene in the final movie.) Ms. DuVernay was tapped as a liaison between King family members and the filmmakers. Nothing ever came of that, however, because the project fell apart when Lee Daniels, who was set to be the director, left after years of trying to make the screenplay work with the budget he had been given. Photo Ms. DuVernay filming in Atlanta. Credit Atsushi Nishijima/Paramount Pictures Ms. DuVernay said that the first director who considered “Selma” was Mr. Mann, who was followed by an intriguing list of directors that she ticked off with a practiced air: Stephen Frears, Paul Haggis, Spike Lee and finally Mr. Daniels. She said that with the exit of Mr. Daniels the producers “just gave up.” David Oyelowo (pronounced oh-YELL-ow-oh), who plays Dr. King, did not. Ms. DuVernay had cast him in “Middle of Nowhere,” and he believed that she could handle “Selma.” He made his case for her in a letter to Pathé, the company that originally financed the movie. (Paramount came onboard later.) Mr. Oyelowo, speaking by phone, said: “If Tom Hooper is allowed to do ‘The King’s Speech,’ having not necessarily done films of a much bigger budget for Pathé, then why not? Why not take a punt on her?” He said Ms. DuVernay had to do some rewriting of the script to work with a budget that was lower than she ended up with. What had been a liability for her — directing with tiny sums of money — became an unexpected asset and, unlike all the male directors, she was able to make the script and budget work together. At some point, Mr. Oyelowo said, everyone realized that she was the one: “If we can’t make it work with her, this film is never going to work. It’s just never going to happen.” “Selma” is certainly modest when compared to mega-blockbusters, where $200 million production budgets are no longer uncommon. (Throw in more for marketing and distribution.) For independents, though, and especially for women, it’s significant. (The production budget often cited for “The Hurt Locker” is about $15 million.) The day I visited the “Selma” set, I was struck by how Ms. DuVernay had made the leap from low-budget filmmaking with a handful of people to commanding hundreds. “I just need some white racists on this side!” she yelled at one point. She later complained that the day had been chaotic, but she looked fully in command, her long hair tucked under a scarf, whether riding shotgun on a cart with Mr. Young or on the ground. Later, when lunch was called, Ms. DuVernay greeted the extras who poured off the bridge, calling out thanks and giving and receiving hugs. Among the marchers were men and women who had been there
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Making History

With ‘Selma,’ Ava DuVernay Seeks a Different Equality

On a swampy afternoon in late June, the director Ava DuVernay stood not far from the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., that haunted place where, President Lyndon B. Johnson told the country, history and fate met. She was instructing a group of white extras on all the ugly things she wanted them to yell at the several hundred black extras snaking across the bridge, part of a sizable army of cast and crew that had been gathered together for “Selma,” her new movie about the campaign for black voter rights.

That day, Ms. DuVernay was restaging Bloody Sunday, March 7, 1965, when the police violently attacked marchers trying to walk to Montgomery, where they would eventually hear the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s call out to the world: “How long? Not long! Because the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.” A centrifugal force, Ms. DuVernay rarely seemed to stop moving. As she called “Action!,” and people and horses began to run, smoke flooding the air, it was thrilling to witness a female director bring this agonizing American story to life and, in the process, stake her own claim on our cultural history.

Ms. DuVernay, 42, belongs to what she calls “a small sorority” of black female filmmakers, who are part of another modest American sisterhood: female directors of any color. And with “Selma,” she has done what few female directors get the opportunity to do, which is go large — with politics and history — with a decent budget and serious muscle. Paramount Pictures is releasing the movie on Dec. 25, and the producers include Oprah Winfrey, who has a small role in the movie as an activist, and Plan B, Brad Pitt’s company. Four years ago, Kathryn Bigelow became the first woman to win an Academy Award as best director; Ms. DuVernay has a shot to become the second.

Like many, I had hoped Ms. Bigelow’s Oscar for “The Hurt Locker” would be transformative, and that soon female directors would be accepted as equal to men, and, crucially, hired as equals. But that hasn’t happened. In 2009, when “The Hurt Locker” was released, women made up 7 percent of the directors on the top 250 domestic grossing films, according to an annual report by the researcher Martha M. Lauzen. As of early December, by my count, only 19 women — 7.6 percent — were directors on the top 250 grossing features released this year. “Selma” may increase that percentage, as might another big-studio release, Angelina Jolie’s “Unbroken,” about the Olympic runner and war prisoner Louis Zamperini.

It will take more than these two filmmakers to disrupt the industry’s sexism, which has long shut women out from directing movies and, increasingly, shuts them out on screen, too. Notably, Ms. DuVernay and Ms. Jolie, having made movies about women, have now made the leap to bigger stakes with stories centered on men. I hope their movies burn up the box office, but I also hope they return to movies about women. We need those stories, and these days, female directors are often the only ones interested in them. Gender equality is an undeniable imperative. But it’s also essential to the future of the movies: This American art became great with stories about men and women, not just a superhero and some token chick.

Ms. DuVernay’s path to “Selma” is unusual, not only because she belongs to a small sorority, but also because she came to directing through publicity. After graduating from the University of California, Los Angeles (she majored in English and African-American studies), she had a flirtation with broadcast journalism before landing a publicity job. At 27, she founded her own agency, working on movies by the likes of Steven Spielberg, which embedded her in every stage of the movie process, all the way to award shows. She was on the set of “Collateral” (2004) the moment that she realized what she wanted.

“I just remember standing there in the middle of the night in East L.A. and watching Michael Mann direct and thinking, ‘I have stories,’ ” she said. “That was the moment I thought: ‘Wow, I could do this. I would like to do that.’ ”

She narrated this origin story back home in Los Angeles in September, as we talked in her house, a midcentury perch overlooking Beachwood Canyon with a view of the Hollywood sign. Hours earlier, she had, in the fashion of 21st century cinema, delivered her cut of “Selma” through a high-speed file transfer. Now people whose opinions mattered — including the producers on the Paramount lot a few miles away and the famous one in Chicago (“Ms. Winfrey,” as Ms. DuVernay calls her) — were looking at “Selma” for the first time.

“Your foot is shaking,” I said. “Are you nervous?”

Ms. DuVernay radiates terrific self-confidence, but I assumed that she was anxious. “No,” she shot back.

With its $20 million production budget and the support of a major studio, “Selma” is far bigger than any of Ms. DuVernay’s previous movies. She made her last one, “Middle of Nowhere,” for $200,000. A small-scale, lapidary drama about a woman finding love, though mostly herself, it was beautifully shot by the cinematographer Bradford Young. (They reunited for “Selma.”) It was well received at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival, but, like the rest of the entries that year, it was overshadowed by the juggernaut known as “Beasts of the Southern Wild.” Ms. DuVernay became the first black woman to win the dramatic directing award at Sundance, and while that was gratifying, it didn’t translate into any immediate gains. “No one offered me anything,” she said matter-of-factly.

This is in stark contrast with what happened to Colin Trevorrow, whose first feature, “Safety Not Guaranteed,” was also at the 2012 festival. In what has become a familiar story of male success, he went on to direct the relaunch of a franchise behemoth, “Jurassic World.” Women rarely receive those kinds of big breaks. The director Mimi Leder (“Deep Impact”) and the writer Linda Woolverton (“Maleficent”) have made a lot of money for the industry, but they recently told me they, too, don’t get the calls that you might expect. That no one clamored to hire Ms. DuVernay is even less a surprise given the segregation of American cinema and an industry mind-set that deems that a movie with two black leads is no longer simply a movie but a black movie.

Ms. DuVernay started directing first in documentary where budgets tend to be low, and you don’t necessarily need to ask anyone’s permission, two reasons so many women may gravitate to the field. She made her first feature, “This Is the Life” (2008), a documentary about a Los Angeles hip-hop scene, for $10,000: check to check as she put it. She subsequently took $50,000 that she had saved to buy a house and used it to make her first dramatic feature, “I Will Follow” (2010), an autobiographical tale about a niece mourning an aunt. Ms. DuVernay released the movie through a distribution company she founded (she’s a busy woman) and sank $100,000 of the profits into “Middle of Nowhere.”

Through it all she kept her day job, which is how she came to “Selma.” In January 2010, The Daily News in New York ran an item about the script, by Paul Webb, and a scene in which Dr. King flirts with a prostitute or, as The News put it, “MLK Flick has Tryst Issues.” (There’s no such scene in the final movie.) Ms. DuVernay was tapped as a liaison between King family members and the filmmakers. Nothing ever came of that, however, because the project fell apart when Lee Daniels, who was set to be the director, left after years of trying to make the screenplay work with the budget he had been given.
Photo

Ms. DuVernay filming in Atlanta. Credit Atsushi Nishijima/Paramount Pictures
Ms. DuVernay said that the first director who considered “Selma” was Mr. Mann, who was followed by an intriguing list of directors that she ticked off with a practiced air: Stephen Frears, Paul Haggis, Spike Lee and finally Mr. Daniels. She said that with the exit of Mr. Daniels the producers “just gave up.” David Oyelowo (pronounced oh-YELL-ow-oh), who plays Dr. King, did not. Ms. DuVernay had cast him in “Middle of Nowhere,” and he believed that she could handle “Selma.” He made his case for her in a letter to Pathé, the company that originally financed the movie. (Paramount came onboard later.)

Mr. Oyelowo, speaking by phone, said: “If Tom Hooper is allowed to do ‘The King’s Speech,’ having not necessarily done films of a much bigger budget for Pathé, then why not? Why not take a punt on her?”

He said Ms. DuVernay had to do some rewriting of the script to work with a budget that was lower than she ended up with. What had been a liability for her — directing with tiny sums of money — became an unexpected asset and, unlike all the male directors, she was able to make the script and budget work together. At some point, Mr. Oyelowo said, everyone realized that she was the one: “If we can’t make it work with her, this film is never going to work. It’s just never going to happen.”

“Selma” is certainly modest when compared to mega-blockbusters, where $200 million production budgets are no longer uncommon. (Throw in more for marketing and distribution.) For independents, though, and especially for women, it’s significant. (The production budget often cited for “The Hurt Locker” is about $15 million.) The day I visited the “Selma” set, I was struck by how Ms. DuVernay had made the leap from low-budget filmmaking with a handful of people to commanding hundreds. “I just need some white racists on this side!” she yelled at one point. She later complained that the day had been chaotic, but she looked fully in command, her long hair tucked under a scarf, whether riding shotgun on a cart with Mr. Young or on the ground. Later, when lunch was called, Ms. DuVernay greeted the extras who poured off the bridge, calling out thanks and giving and receiving hugs. Among the marchers were men and women who had been there

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Picasa This young actress is seen in Annie, and Beasts of the Southern Wild. 2014 may be ending, but 2015 is coming. I know she will find her name in 2015. I can be something. That's what she taught me. #Quvenzhané wallis #Inspiration
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This young actress is seen in Annie, and Beasts of the Southern Wild. 2014 may be ending, but 2015 is coming. I know she will find her name in 2015. I can be something. That's what she taught me.
#Quvenzhané wallis #Inspiration

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Picasa ‘Annie': Movie review Every parent of school-aged children will hit a day, over the next three weeks, when they want to throw in the towel. That’s when this uneven “Annie” reboot, starring Jamie Foxx and Quvenzhané Wallis, will come in handy. Kids will enjoy it, and adults desperate for a new activity will endure it. In 1982, critics savaged John Huston’s attempt to bring this adored musical to the big screen. But children loved it because, as this intermittently misguided effort proves, it’s impossible to ruin the allure of great tunes, plucky kids and heartfelt fantasies. Director Will Gluck (“Easy A”) and co-screenwriter Aline Brosh McKenna (“27 Dresses”) have made some smart updates, like turning Annie from wide-eyed, Depression-era orphan into a savvy foster kid. It’s also nice to see their multicultural cast, given that too many family films are still so lacking in diversity. Barry Wetcher Stacks (Jamie Foxx) and Annie (Quvenzhane Wallis) spend some time together in “Annie.” Our heroine (Wallis, a 2013 Oscar nominee for “Beasts of the Southern Wild”) lives in Harlem with mean Ms. Hannigan (Cameron Diaz), who makes her money boarding foster girls. Fortunately, Annie gets a guardian upgrade when she meets mayoral candidate Will Stacks (Jamie [...] http://newsnyork.com/annie-movie-review-2/
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‘Annie': Movie review

Every parent of school-aged children will hit a day, over the next three weeks, when they want to throw in the towel. That’s when this uneven “Annie” reboot, starring Jamie Foxx and Quvenzhané Wallis, will come in handy. Kids will enjoy it, and adults desperate for a new activity will endure it. In 1982, critics savaged John Huston’s attempt to bring this adored musical to the big screen. But children loved it because, as this intermittently misguided effort proves, it’s impossible to ruin the allure of great tunes, plucky kids and heartfelt fantasies. Director Will Gluck (“Easy A”) and co-screenwriter Aline Brosh McKenna (“27 Dresses”) have made some smart updates, like turning Annie from wide-eyed, Depression-era orphan into a savvy foster kid. It’s also nice to see their multicultural cast, given that too many family films are still so lacking in diversity. Barry Wetcher Stacks (Jamie Foxx) and Annie (Quvenzhane Wallis) spend some time together in “Annie.” Our heroine (Wallis, a 2013 Oscar nominee for “Beasts of the Southern Wild”) lives in Harlem with mean Ms. Hannigan (Cameron Diaz), who makes her money boarding foster girls. Fortunately, Annie gets a guardian upgrade when she meets mayoral candidate Will Stacks (Jamie [...]
http://newsnyork.com/annie-movie-review-2/

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Picasa ♪♬♩•*¨*•.¸¸Just done watching "Annie”. Sandra Bullock was originally considered to play Miss Hannigan, but she declined the role. Cameron Diaz then signed on to replace Bullock. This is the musical debut for the following people ➳ writer/director Will Gluck, producers Jay Z and Will Smith, writer Emma Thompson, and actors Quvenzhané Wallis, Cameron Diaz, and Rose Byrne. Justin Timberlake was allegedly considered to play Benjamin Stacks (a.k.a. Daddy Warbucks). However, Jamie Foxx was signed to play the role. The film was originally envisioned by Will Smith as a star vehicle for his daughter Willow Smith; however, she had to drop out because she was too old to play Annie. 'Quvenzhane Wallis', just off her tremendous success with Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012), was chosen to replace Willow Smith for Annie. Unlike the other film adaptations of Annie, producers Jay Z and Will Smith envisioned this version as "a modern re ➳ imagining of a beloved musical". This is the second musical film for Jamie Foxx since Dreamgirls (2006) and Bobby Cannavale since Romance & Cigarettes (2005). This is the first time that Will Smith and Emma Thompson have collaborated since they appeared together in Men in Black 3 (2012), which was also produced by Columbia Pictures.¸¸.•*¨*•♩♬♪ ➺ Home Sweet Home, My Humble Crib ➳ Champ20Ns Way. ⓘⓩ♪♬♩d(^_^)b❤M¡J❤d(^_^)b♩♬♪ⓩⓨ™
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♪♬♩•*¨*•.¸¸Just done watching "Annie”. Sandra Bullock was originally considered to play Miss Hannigan, but she declined the role. Cameron Diaz then signed on to replace Bullock. This is the musical debut for the following people ➳ writer/director Will Gluck, producers Jay Z and Will Smith, writer Emma Thompson, and actors Quvenzhané Wallis, Cameron Diaz, and Rose Byrne. Justin Timberlake was allegedly considered to play Benjamin Stacks (a.k.a. Daddy Warbucks). However, Jamie Foxx was signed to play the role. The film was originally envisioned by Will Smith as a star vehicle for his daughter Willow Smith; however, she had to drop out because she was too old to play Annie. 'Quvenzhane Wallis', just off her tremendous success with Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012), was chosen to replace Willow Smith for Annie. Unlike the other film adaptations of Annie, producers Jay Z and Will Smith envisioned this version as "a modern re ➳ imagining of a beloved musical". This is the second musical film for Jamie Foxx since Dreamgirls (2006) and Bobby Cannavale since Romance & Cigarettes (2005). This is the first time that Will Smith and Emma Thompson have collaborated since they appeared together in Men in Black 3 (2012), which was also produced by Columbia Pictures.¸¸.•*¨*•♩♬♪
➺ Home Sweet Home, My Humble Crib ➳ Champ20Ns Way.
ⓘⓩ♪♬♩d(^_^)b❤M¡J❤d(^_^)b♩♬♪ⓩⓨ™

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Picasa #TheAcademy : Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012), with the Oscar-nominated Quvenzhané Wallis (standing, center), and Dwight Henry (standing, back to the camera). ... http://buff.ly/1wKGwPv for_More
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#TheAcademy : Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012), with the Oscar-nominated Quvenzhané Wallis (standing, center), and Dwight Henry (standing, back to the camera). ... http://buff.ly/1wKGwPv for_More
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Picasa +Luci Fer John Doe No. 24 BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD Official Trailer (2012) [HD] Life of Pi Soundtrack - Pi's Lullaby - English Sub-Titles +Rashida Jones Jeremiah 8:1-3 NLT “In that day,” says the Lord +Luci Fer, “the enemy will break open the graves of the kings and officials of Judah, and the graves of the priests, prophets, and common people of Jerusalem. They will spread out their bones on the ground before the sun, moon, and stars—the gods my people have loved, served, and worshiped. Their bones will not be gathered up again or buried but will be scattered on the ground like manure. And the people of this evil nation who survive will wish to die rather than live where I will send them--Hell. I, the Lord +Luci Fer of Heaven’s +Rashida Jones Armies, have spoken!
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+Luci Fer John Doe No. 24 BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD Official Trailer (2012) [HD] Life of Pi Soundtrack - Pi's Lullaby - English Sub-Titles +Rashida Jones

Jeremiah 8:1-3 NLT

“In that day,” says the Lord +Luci Fer, “the enemy will break open the graves of the kings and officials of Judah, and the graves of the priests, prophets, and common people of Jerusalem.

They will spread out their bones on the ground before the sun, moon, and stars—the gods my people have loved, served, and worshiped. Their bones will not be gathered up again or buried but will be scattered on the ground like manure.

And the people of this evil nation who survive will wish to die rather than live where I will send them--Hell. I, the Lord +Luci Fer of Heaven’s +Rashida Jones Armies, have spoken!

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Picasa #TheAcademy : Quvenzhane Wallis, who at 9 years old, became the youngest person ever to be nominated for Best Actress for her role in Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012).. Find us on--->>http://buff.ly/1ol19Ms
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#TheAcademy : Quvenzhane Wallis, who at 9 years old, became the youngest person ever to be nominated for Best Actress for her role in Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012).. Find us on--->>http://buff.ly/1ol19Ms
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Picasa When you watch 'Beasts of the Southern Wild', 'The Fault in Our Stars', or another sad/happycrying movie
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When you watch 'Beasts of the Southern Wild', 'The Fault in Our Stars', or another sad/happycrying movie
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Picasa Experience Beasts of the Southern Wild live in London next week! There'll be two live music performances of one of the most extraordinary films to come from America in the last few years happening at London's Barbican Hall on the 30th and 31st July. The New York Times described Beasts of the Southern Wild as 'a blast of sheer, improbable joy, a boisterous, thrilling action movie and a passionate and unruly explosion of Americana, which winks at skepticism, laughs at sober analysis and stares down criticism.' Composer Dan Romer and director/co-composer Benh Zeitlin have perfectly captured the film’s southern bayou heartbeat with a lovely mix of mystical and traditional Louisiana music that echo the strange world of this gorgeous film, which you can see on a huge screen with the two composers and the Serious Orchestra, conducted by Ryan McAdams, playing the acclaimed score live. Tickets: http://bit.ly/1t4arTo
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Experience Beasts of the Southern Wild live in London next week!

There'll be two live music performances of one of the most extraordinary films to come from America in the last few years happening at London's Barbican Hall on the 30th and 31st July. The New York Times described Beasts of the Southern Wild as 'a blast of sheer, improbable joy, a boisterous, thrilling action movie and a passionate and unruly explosion of Americana, which winks at skepticism, laughs at sober analysis and stares down criticism.'

Composer Dan Romer and director/co-composer Benh Zeitlin have perfectly captured the film’s southern bayou heartbeat with a lovely mix of mystical and traditional Louisiana music that echo the strange world of this gorgeous film, which you can see on a huge screen with the two composers and the Serious Orchestra, conducted by Ryan McAdams, playing the acclaimed score live.

Tickets: http://bit.ly/1t4arTo

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Picasa This year Ster-Kinekor Theatres and Cinema Nouveau will be treating you to a daily morning movie screening; in between all the chaos, you have the opportunity to sit back with some popcorn and watch: *Earth *Beasts of the Southern Wild *Departures *Searching for Sugarman
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This year Ster-Kinekor Theatres and Cinema Nouveau will be treating you to a daily morning movie screening; in between all the chaos, you have the opportunity to sit back with some popcorn and watch:

*Earth
*Beasts of the Southern Wild
*Departures
*Searching for Sugarman

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Picasa The Rocket Review. Rating: 5/5. If there was any part of Beasts of the Southern Wild that I loved the most it would be the idea that anything can be made to look exciting and delightful through the eyes of a child. The film worked because it shined a light on the sense of imagination we had lost by growing up and The Rocket reminds us in a very similar way that imagination and dreaming can http://bit.ly/1mZXKpe
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The Rocket Review. Rating: 5/5. If there was any part of Beasts of the Southern Wild that I loved the most it would be the idea that anything can be made to look exciting and delightful through the eyes of a child. The film worked because it shined a light on the sense of imagination we had lost by growing up and The Rocket reminds us in a very similar way that imagination and dreaming can http://bit.ly/1mZXKpe
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Picasa An inside look into the development of the screenplay for Beasts of the Southern Wild at the Sundance Lab. http://www.bluecatscreenplay.com/blog/inside-the-sundance-lab-beasts-of-the-southern-wild/
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An inside look into the development of the screenplay for Beasts of the Southern Wild at the Sundance Lab.

http://www.bluecatscreenplay.com/blog/inside-the-sundance-lab-beasts-of-the-southern-wild/

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Picasa Congrats to Quvenzhane Wallis (Beasts of the Southern Wild) for being named Face Of Armani Junior, making her the “first major child celebrity to be the face of a luxury brand.”
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Congrats to Quvenzhane Wallis (Beasts of the Southern Wild) for being named Face Of Armani Junior, making her the “first major child celebrity to be the face of a luxury brand.”
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Picasa Quvenzhané Wallis Named New Face Of Armani Junior With a sure-to-be-hit movie “Annie” out soon and plenty of industry cred to her name, Quvenzhane Wallis shouldn’t be surprised by high-profile offers, regardless of the realm. The 10-year-old “Beasts of the Southern Wild” starlet was chosen to front the new Armani Junior ad campaign and she couldn’t be happier. Quvenzhane shared, "I'm so happy to be chosen by Mr. Armani to be his ambassador for Armani Junior. I felt the same excitement when I got cast for a major film. Me? Wow! I was honored to wear his custom gown to the Oscars. It made me feel like a princess. When I saw Mr. Armani's Prive' show in New York, the dresses were so pretty . . . I had too many favorites. Afterwards when I met him, I realized Mr. Armani is such a nice man. I liked that that he was so thoughtful. It's fun to wear Armani Junior since I really like the clothes. It's young. It's cool. My friends are going to want to borrow all my clothes." And Giorgio Armani is confident Miss Wallis is the perfect fit. "Quvenzhane is so talented, despite her young age. Her kindness, curiosity and openness towards others really struck me, as they are all traits I admire. It is for this very reason that I wanted her to be the face of Armani Junior. With her insatiable energy, Quvenzhane made the clothing come alive, interpreting it in her own singular way."
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Quvenzhané Wallis Named New Face Of Armani Junior

With a sure-to-be-hit movie “Annie” out soon and plenty of industry cred to her name, Quvenzhane Wallis shouldn’t be surprised by high-profile offers, regardless of the realm.

The 10-year-old “Beasts of the Southern Wild” starlet was chosen to front the new Armani Junior ad campaign and she couldn’t be happier.

Quvenzhane shared, "I'm so happy to be chosen by Mr. Armani to be his ambassador for Armani Junior. I felt the same excitement when I got cast for a major film. Me? Wow! I was honored to wear his custom gown to the Oscars. It made me feel like a princess. When I saw Mr. Armani's Prive' show in New York, the dresses were so pretty . . . I had too many favorites. Afterwards when I met him, I realized Mr. Armani is such a nice man. I liked that that he was so thoughtful. It's fun to wear Armani Junior since I really like the clothes. It's young. It's cool. My friends are going to want to borrow all my clothes."

And Giorgio Armani is confident Miss Wallis is the perfect fit. "Quvenzhane is so talented, despite her young age. Her kindness, curiosity and openness towards others really struck me, as they are all traits I admire. It is for this very reason that I wanted her to be the face of Armani Junior. With her insatiable energy, Quvenzhane made the clothing come alive, interpreting it in her own singular way."

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Picasa The new face of Armani Junior: Quvenzhane Wallis Ten-year-old Quvenzhane Wallis, star of Beasts of the Southern Wild and the youngest Oscar nominee of all time, has been named the face of Armani Junior, Giorgio Armani’s line for children and teens. She is the first major child celebrity to be the face of a luxury brand.
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The new face of Armani Junior: Quvenzhane Wallis

Ten-year-old Quvenzhane Wallis, star of Beasts of the Southern Wild and the youngest Oscar nominee of all time, has been named the face of Armani Junior, Giorgio Armani’s line for children and teens. She is the first major child celebrity to be the face of a luxury brand.

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Picasa Quvenzhané Wallis (QUVENZHANE) the young Oscar nominated actress who wowed us in her debut appearance in the also Oscar Nominated 'Beasts of the Southern Wild' has been named as the Face of Armani Junior. This will be the first time a child star has fronted the fashion brand. The actress who was last seen in the Steve McQueen directed '12 Years a Slave' will soon be seen in the leading role in the remake of the classic film Annie, which stars Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje (@adewale) out this winter. www.thebritishblacklist.com
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Quvenzhané Wallis (QUVENZHANE) the young Oscar nominated actress who wowed us in her debut appearance in the also Oscar Nominated 'Beasts of the Southern Wild' has been named as the Face of Armani Junior. This will be the first time a child star has fronted the fashion brand.

The actress who was last seen in the Steve McQueen directed '12 Years a Slave' will soon be seen in the leading role in the remake of the classic film Annie, which stars Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje (@adewale) out this winter.

www.thebritishblacklist.com

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Picasa ANNIE [TBC] OFFICIAL TRAILER A Broadway classic that has delighted audiences for generations comes to the big screen with a new, contemporary vision in Columbia Pictures' comedy, Annie. Academy Award nominee Quvenzhané Wallis [Beasts of the Southern Wild] stars as Annie, a young, happy foster kid who's also tough enough to make her way on the streets of New York in 2014. Originally left by her parents as a baby with the promise that they'd be back for her someday, it's been a hard knock life ever since with her mean foster mom Miss Hannigan [Cameron Diaz]. But everything's about to change when the hard-nosed tycoon and New York mayoral candidate Will Stacks [Jamie Foxx] – advised by his brilliant VP, Grace [Rose Byrne] and his shrewd and scheming campaign advisor, Guy [Bobby Cannavale] – makes a thinly-veiled campaign move and takes her in. Stacks believes he's her guardian angel, but Annie's self-assured nature and bright, sun-will-come-out-tomorrow outlook on life just might mean it's the other way around.
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ANNIE [TBC] OFFICIAL TRAILER

A Broadway classic that has delighted audiences for generations comes to the big screen with a new, contemporary vision in Columbia Pictures' comedy, Annie.

Academy Award nominee Quvenzhané Wallis [Beasts of the Southern Wild] stars as Annie, a young, happy foster kid who's also tough enough to make her way on the streets of New York in 2014. Originally left by her parents as a baby with the promise that they'd be back for her someday, it's been a hard knock life ever since with her mean foster mom Miss Hannigan [Cameron Diaz].

But everything's about to change when the hard-nosed tycoon and New York mayoral candidate Will Stacks [Jamie Foxx] – advised by his brilliant VP, Grace [Rose Byrne] and his shrewd and scheming campaign advisor, Guy [Bobby Cannavale] – makes a thinly-veiled campaign move and takes her in.

Stacks believes he's her guardian angel, but Annie's self-assured nature and bright, sun-will-come-out-tomorrow outlook on life just might mean it's the other way around.

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Picasa the lead role in the independent film that cost only a million dollars, "Beasts of the Southern Wild" and which earned an Oscar nomination for "Best Actress".
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the lead role in the independent film that cost only a million dollars, "Beasts of the Southern Wild" and which earned an Oscar nomination for "Best Actress".
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Picasa My favorite movie is " Beasts of the Southern Wild." I cried like a baby at the end.
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My favorite movie is " Beasts of the Southern Wild." I cried like a baby at the end.
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Picasa "It's the hard knock life, for us" Erster Trailer zum Musical "Annie" mit Jamie Foxx, Cameron Diaz und "Beasts of the Southern Wild"-Star Quvenzhané Wallis --> http://outnow.ch/Movies/News/3911
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"It's the hard knock life, for us"

Erster Trailer zum Musical "Annie" mit Jamie Foxx, Cameron Diaz und "Beasts of the Southern Wild"-Star Quvenzhané Wallis
--> http://outnow.ch/Movies/News/3911

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Picasa As some of you may have gleaned, I've written my first book. Finally. The book is "The $11 Billion Year: From Sundance to the Oscars, an Inside Look at the Changing Hollywood System" and will be published by Newmarket Press for It Books/an imprint of HarperCollins, on March 4. I'm putting together various book signings, talks and parties in New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles, among other places, in the coming months. Stay tuned for details. Why did I write this? Inspired by William Goldman's classic book, "The Season," about one year on Broadway, I have long wanted to write an in-depth, informed chronicle of what goes on within one year inside the motion picture industry from my reporter's point of view. I believed it could provide insights and a behind-the-scenes perspective on every aspect of the business of movies like no other book had done before. The 2012 slate provided me the perfect opportunity to take on this challenge, resulting in "The $11 Billion Year." It was tough. Is it a business book? It's like the blog-it's intended to inform smart film lovers about the inner workings of the movie industry. In nine chapters-plus an afterword, photo insert, glossary, and box office charts I follow the transformative year 2012, from the Sundance Film Festival to the Oscars, just as I covered it here, but with more more in-depth reporting. I show how the global business of Hollywood really works by detailing the making and marketing of movies, from low-budget indies to studio blockbusters, the players, winners, and losers. Starting at Sundance in January, I follow the eventual nine Best Picture contenders through their long road to the Oscars. I cover the indies and their new distribution models at Sundance. Why did "Beasts of the Southern Wild" become the darling of the festival? What might the exhibitors' jockeying at Cinema-Con, the studio summer tentpole showcases at Comic-Con and the fall's "smart" films and BIG films of the holiday season introduced at Telluride, Toronto, and New York Festivals have to do with making or breaking a film's chances? How did Harvey Weinstein's maneuvers at the international scene at Cannes benefit "Django Unchained" and "Silver Linings Playbook"? Looking at "Zero Dark Thirty," how are women filmmakers and movies about women faring, are things improving? I show the the glamour of the Oscars. Why did "Argo" beat "Lincoln" for Best Picture? What are the nine movies? "Beasts of the Southern Wild," "Amour," "Life of Pi," "Lincoln," "Silver Linings Playbook," "Zero Dark Thirty," "Django Unchained," "Les Miserables," and "Argo." Plus a look at some Oscar-bound documentaries and foreign films and Hollywood's love affair with franchises and comic book movies. What sets this book part from all the other Hollywood books? I'm dealing with recent history and movies folks may have heard of, using these films as a window into examining the Hollywood machine at work, from script development and production to marketing and distribution, as studios decide on their release strategies, schmooze with media influencers, and face the myriad challenges now facing the industry, including declining DVD sales, soaring production and marketing costs, escalating box office ticket prices, shorter exhibition windows, and the incredible impact of the digital revolution-from 3D to VOD and IMAX. How can I buy it? You can pre-order the book at  Amazon, iBookstore, Barnes & Noble, Indiebound, Books-A-Million , or Google, or you can ask your local independent bookstore to order it. The publisher is HarperCollins and the ISBN-13 is: 9780062218018. More info on the book (http://www.harpercollins.com/books/11-Billion-Year-Anne-Thompson/?isbn=9780062218032). How can I order a copy for possible review or interview? You can contact HarperCollins publicity manager Joseph Papa at Joseph.Papa@HARPERCOLLINS.com. Can I book a Q & A or book signing or a 2012 flick at a movie theater or bookstore? Sure, contact Joseph. I hope you like the book. It's a picture of my world.
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As some of you may have gleaned, I've written my first book. Finally.

The book is "The $11 Billion Year: From Sundance to the Oscars, an Inside Look at the Changing Hollywood System" and will be published by Newmarket Press for It Books/an imprint of HarperCollins, on March 4. I'm putting together various book signings, talks and parties in New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles, among other places, in the coming months. Stay tuned for details.

Why did I write this?

Inspired by William Goldman's classic book, "The Season," about one year on Broadway, I have long wanted to write an in-depth, informed chronicle of what goes on within one year inside the motion picture industry from my reporter's point of view. I believed it could provide insights and a behind-the-scenes perspective on every aspect of the business of movies like no other book had done before. The 2012 slate provided me the perfect opportunity to take on this challenge, resulting in "The $11 Billion Year." It was tough.

Is it a business book?

It's like the blog-it's intended to inform smart film lovers about the inner workings of the movie industry. In nine chapters-plus an afterword, photo insert, glossary, and box office charts I follow the transformative year 2012, from the Sundance Film Festival to the Oscars, just as I covered it here, but with more more in-depth reporting. I show how the global business of Hollywood really works by detailing the making and marketing of movies, from low-budget indies to studio blockbusters, the players, winners, and losers.

Starting at Sundance in January, I follow the eventual nine Best Picture contenders through their long road to the Oscars. I cover the indies and their new distribution models at Sundance. Why did "Beasts of the Southern Wild" become the darling of the festival? What might the exhibitors' jockeying at Cinema-Con, the studio summer tentpole showcases at Comic-Con and the fall's "smart" films and BIG films of the holiday season introduced at Telluride, Toronto, and New York Festivals have to do with making or breaking a film's chances? How did Harvey Weinstein's maneuvers at the international scene at Cannes benefit "Django Unchained" and "Silver Linings Playbook"? Looking at "Zero Dark Thirty," how are women filmmakers and movies about women faring, are things improving? I show the the glamour of the Oscars. Why did "Argo" beat "Lincoln" for Best Picture?

What are the nine movies?

"Beasts of the Southern Wild," "Amour," "Life of Pi," "Lincoln," "Silver Linings Playbook," "Zero Dark Thirty," "Django Unchained," "Les Miserables," and "Argo." Plus a look at some Oscar-bound documentaries and foreign films and Hollywood's love affair with franchises and comic book movies.

What sets this book part from all the other Hollywood books?

I'm dealing with recent history and movies folks may have heard of, using these films as a window into examining the Hollywood machine at work, from script development and production to marketing and distribution, as studios decide on their release strategies, schmooze with media influencers, and face the myriad challenges now facing the industry, including declining DVD sales, soaring production and marketing costs, escalating box office ticket prices, shorter exhibition windows, and the incredible impact of the digital revolution-from 3D to VOD and IMAX.

How can I buy it?

You can pre-order the book at  Amazon, iBookstore, Barnes & Noble, Indiebound, Books-A-Million , or Google, or you can ask your local independent bookstore to order it. The publisher is HarperCollins and the ISBN-13 is: 9780062218018. More info on the book (http://www.harpercollins.com/books/11-Billion-Year-Anne-Thompson/?isbn=9780062218032).

How can I order a copy for possible review or interview?

You can contact HarperCollins publicity manager Joseph Papa at Joseph.Papa@HARPERCOLLINS.com.

Can I book a Q & A or book signing or a 2012 flick at a movie theater or bookstore?

Sure, contact Joseph.

I hope you like the book. It's a picture of my world.

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Picasa Collier's Weekly - "Of the Southern Wild" "When it all goes quiet behind my eyes, I see everything ..." ~ Beasts of the Southern Wild
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Collier's Weekly - "Of the Southern Wild"

"When it all goes quiet behind my eyes, I see everything ..." ~ Beasts of the Southern Wild

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Picasa Beasts Of The Southern Wild - 2012
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Beasts Of The Southern Wild - 2012
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Picasa JLaw, Justin, and Miley Make Forbes 30 Under 30 List for 2014 -Forbes Magazine announced their 30 Under 30 list and it is filled with young entertainers. Jennifer Lawrence, Miley Cyrus, Justin Bieber, Katy Perry, Lady Gaga, Bruno Mars and Lorde are among those named by experts in 15 different fields.  Beasts of the Southern Wild actress Quvenzhane Wallis was the youngest on the list – she is only 10 years old!
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JLaw, Justin, and Miley Make Forbes 30 Under 30 List for 2014 -Forbes Magazine announced their 30 Under 30 list and it is filled with young entertainers. Jennifer Lawrence, Miley Cyrus, Justin Bieber, Katy Perry, Lady Gaga, Bruno Mars and Lorde are among those named by experts in 15 different fields.  Beasts of the Southern Wild actress Quvenzhane Wallis was the youngest on the list – she is only 10 years old!
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