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Picasa Collier's Weekly - "Of the Southern Wild" "When it all goes quiet behind my eyes, I see everything ..." ~ Beasts of the Southern Wild
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Collier's Weekly - "Of the Southern Wild"

"When it all goes quiet behind my eyes, I see everything ..." ~ Beasts of the Southern Wild

Recent Updated: 3 days ago - Created by Sinden Collier Photography - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Sinden Collier Photography
Picasa Oscars Best Picture: 7 Underdogs That Could Benefit from Preferential Ballot All hope isn’t lost for “American Sniper.” Even though the Bradley Cooper drama about Navy SEAL Chris Kyle hasn’t leapt into the award season race yet, it still holds a stealth advantage as it enters Oscar balloting — passionate fans. The Golden Globe nominees (announced on Thursday) and SAG Awards (Wednesday) don’t necessarily take passion into account. But the Academy Award nominating system for best picture, determined by a preferential ballot (that puts more “weight” on a film ranked as No. 1 by a voter), can help out a movie like “Sniper,” which has ardent groupies. In recent years, films such as “A Serious Man,” “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close,” “District 9,” “Tree of Life,” “Toy Story 3″ and “Amour” were nominated in the top Oscar category because their fans loved them in a fanatical way. Here are seven filmsthat could benefit from a similar surge this year. 1. “Unbroken” Angelina Jolie has been campaigning like Hillary Clinton for her World War II drama about Louis Zamperini, but the Globes and SAG snubbed “Unbroken” in all categories. The Academy, on the other hand, may not. Actors love to celebrate actors who direct — see Ben Affleck (“Argo”), Warren Beatty (“Reds”), George Clooney (“Good Night, and Good Luck“) and Kevin Costner (“Dances With Wolves”), which is why “Unbroken” will still probably be among the 10 (or fewer) nominees for best picture. But Jolie’s odds of cracking the best director race have dimmed as a result of mixed reviews. 2. “American Sniper” The Academy has been less excited about some of Clint Eastwood’s recent projects — like “Gran Torino,” “Hereafter” and “J. Edgar” — compared to his earlier work as a director. But “American Sniper” is his best film since “Million Dollar Baby,” and there’s a lot of enthusiasm for Bradley Cooper’s astonishing transformation. He’s almost unrecognizable in the role that required him to pack on 40 pounds and train like a real Navy SEAL. It’s a mystery why the Hollywood Foreign Press overlooked the film, but it may have to do with the fact that foreign journalists didn’t want to honor a movie that champions the U.S. military (that could also explain “Unbroken’s” snub). In 2006 “Munich” didn’t get much Golden Globes support either, but still earned five Oscar nominations, including for best picture. 3. “Whiplash” Until now, the only awards season love for “Whiplash” has been for best supporting actor J.K. Simmons. But at Academy events, informal polls show that Academy voters are very high on the movie — it’s about a disciplined performer, after all (Miles Teller as a professional drummer) — making it a likely bet for best picture. The director race is crowded, but if voters make room for a prodigy, they could award a surprise nomination to Damien Chazelle, like they did in 2013 for Benh Zeitlin (“Beasts of the Southern Wild”). 4. “Wild” This adaption of Cheryl Strayed’s hiking memoir isn’t just a vehicle for Reese Witherspoon. Academy voters awarded Jean-Marc Vallee’s last picture, “Dallas Buyers Club,” with six Oscar nominations, and “Wild” could make a surprise last-minute sprint in categories like best picture and adapted screenplay. And don’t count out Laura Dern, who was snubbed for best-supporting actress by SAG and the Golden Globes. There’s plenty of goodwill for the once-child actress in the Academy—and she’s overdue since she’s been nominated for an Oscar only once (1992’s “Rambling Rose”). 5. “Inherent Vice” Depending on whom you talk to, Paul Thomas Anderson’s latest, based on the Thomas Pynchon novel about a pothead private detective (Joaquin Phoenix), is either a riot or an incoherent bore. Many Academy voters probably fall in the latter category, but one can never underestimate Anderson’s popularity with the actors branch. If enough of them put this film in the No. 1 spot on their ballots, it could eke its way into the expanded best picture race. 6. “Nightcrawler” Jake Gyllenhaal’s haunting performance as an L.A. crime paparazzo, for which he lost 30 pounds, landed him acting noms from both the Golden Globes and SAG this week, and he’s inching his way closer to his first lead actor Oscar nomination (he was previously nominated in supporting for 2005’s “Brokeback Mountain”). “Nightcrawler” has a passionate fanbase: I think it will be one of the best picture nominees. And if there are any surprises in best supporting actress, Rene Russo could (and should) be in the mix for playing a TV news executive. 7. “Interstellar” Christopher Nolan hasn’t had a great track record with the Academy — the reason we have extra best picture nominees is that 2008’s “The Dark Knight” didn’t make the cut — but he rebounded as 2010’s “Inception” with eight nominations. On paper,  “Interstellar” would would seem his most Academy-friendly film: It’s a parable about love between a father (Matthew McConaughey) and his daughter; its bittersweet ending is reminiscent of “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” etc. Even if Academy voters have a phobia about special effects, at least one of the best picture nominees is going to need to be a hit. Given all the tears at the New York premiere last month, there’s still a chance “Interstellar” could take off this award season. posted by www.exhibeflix.com
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Oscars Best Picture: 7 Underdogs That Could Benefit from Preferential Ballot

All hope isn’t lost for “American Sniper.” Even though the Bradley Cooper drama about Navy SEAL Chris Kyle hasn’t leapt into the award season race yet, it still holds a stealth advantage as it enters Oscar balloting — passionate fans.

The Golden Globe nominees (announced on Thursday) and SAG Awards (Wednesday) don’t necessarily take passion into account. But the Academy Award nominating system for best picture, determined by a preferential ballot (that puts more “weight” on a film ranked as No. 1 by a voter), can help out a movie like “Sniper,” which has ardent groupies. In recent years, films such as “A Serious Man,” “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close,” “District 9,” “Tree of Life,” “Toy Story 3″ and “Amour” were nominated in the top Oscar category because their fans loved them in a fanatical way.

Here are seven filmsthat could benefit from a similar surge this year.

1. “Unbroken”
Angelina Jolie has been campaigning like Hillary Clinton for her World War II drama about Louis Zamperini, but the Globes and SAG snubbed “Unbroken” in all categories. The Academy, on the other hand, may not. Actors love to celebrate actors who direct — see Ben Affleck (“Argo”), Warren Beatty (“Reds”), George Clooney (“Good Night, and Good Luck“) and Kevin Costner (“Dances With Wolves”), which is why “Unbroken” will still probably be among the 10 (or fewer) nominees for best picture. But Jolie’s odds of cracking the best director race have dimmed as a result of mixed reviews.

2. “American Sniper”
The Academy has been less excited about some of Clint Eastwood’s recent projects — like “Gran Torino,” “Hereafter” and “J. Edgar” — compared to his earlier work as a director. But “American Sniper” is his best film since “Million Dollar Baby,” and there’s a lot of enthusiasm for Bradley Cooper’s astonishing transformation. He’s almost unrecognizable in the role that required him to pack on 40 pounds and train like a real Navy SEAL. It’s a mystery why the Hollywood Foreign Press overlooked the film, but it may have to do with the fact that foreign journalists didn’t want to honor a movie that champions the U.S. military (that could also explain “Unbroken’s” snub). In 2006 “Munich” didn’t get much Golden Globes support either, but still earned five Oscar nominations, including for best picture.

3. “Whiplash”
Until now, the only awards season love for “Whiplash” has been for best supporting actor J.K. Simmons. But at Academy events, informal polls show that Academy voters are very high on the movie — it’s about a disciplined performer, after all (Miles Teller as a professional drummer) — making it a likely bet for best picture. The director race is crowded, but if voters make room for a prodigy, they could award a surprise nomination to Damien Chazelle, like they did in 2013 for Benh Zeitlin (“Beasts of the Southern Wild”).

4. “Wild”
This adaption of Cheryl Strayed’s hiking memoir isn’t just a vehicle for Reese Witherspoon. Academy voters awarded Jean-Marc Vallee’s last picture, “Dallas Buyers Club,” with six Oscar nominations, and “Wild” could make a surprise last-minute sprint in categories like best picture and adapted screenplay. And don’t count out Laura Dern, who was snubbed for best-supporting actress by SAG and the Golden Globes. There’s plenty of goodwill for the once-child actress in the Academy—and she’s overdue since she’s been nominated for an Oscar only once (1992’s “Rambling Rose”).

5. “Inherent Vice”
Depending on whom you talk to, Paul Thomas Anderson’s latest, based on the Thomas Pynchon novel about a pothead private detective (Joaquin Phoenix), is either a riot or an incoherent bore. Many Academy voters probably fall in the latter category, but one can never underestimate Anderson’s popularity with the actors branch. If enough of them put this film in the No. 1 spot on their ballots, it could eke its way into the expanded best picture race.

6. “Nightcrawler”
Jake Gyllenhaal’s haunting performance as an L.A. crime paparazzo, for which he lost 30 pounds, landed him acting noms from both the Golden Globes and SAG this week, and he’s inching his way closer to his first lead actor Oscar nomination (he was previously nominated in supporting for 2005’s “Brokeback Mountain”). “Nightcrawler” has a passionate fanbase: I think it will be one of the best picture nominees. And if there are any surprises in best supporting actress, Rene Russo could (and should) be in the mix for playing a TV news executive.

7. “Interstellar”
Christopher Nolan hasn’t had a great track record with the Academy — the reason we have extra best picture nominees is that 2008’s “The Dark Knight” didn’t make the cut — but he rebounded as 2010’s “Inception” with eight nominations. On paper,  “Interstellar” would would seem his most Academy-friendly film: It’s a parable about love between a father (Matthew McConaughey) and his daughter; its bittersweet ending is reminiscent of “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” etc. Even if Academy voters have a phobia about special effects, at least one of the best picture nominees is going to need to be a hit. Given all the tears at the New York premiere last month, there’s still a chance “Interstellar” could take off this award season.

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www.exhibeflix.com

Recent Updated: 5 days ago - Created by EXHIBE FLIX - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - EXHIBE FLIX
Picasa Bet your bottom dollar, the latest screen incarnation of a certain orphan is on DVD and Blu-ray today. "View From the Couch" By Jay Bobbin​ “ANNIE”: It’s still a hard-knock life for the orphaned character in this revision of the hit musical inspired by the classic comic strip. Quvenzhané Wallis (“Beasts of the Southern Wild”) has the title role, with Jamie Foxx as this version’s Daddy Warbucks, a cellular tycoon named “Will Stacks” … but there’s a sinister Miss Hannigan that remains on board, played this time by Cameron Diaz. The score also is intact, including such standards as “Maybe” and (of course) “Tomorrow.” Rose Byrne, Bobby Cannavale and David Zayas (“Dexter”) are among co-stars, and several famous faces turn up in cameos. DVD extras: "making-of" documentary; audio commentary by director and co-screenwriter Will Gluck; music video. (PG: AS, P) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand) “TOP FIVE”: Chris Rock generally had been off the movie radar for a while when he came back big-time as writer, director and star of this smart comedy that takes its shots at the concept of – and perils of – fame.  Rock’s character clearly is semiautobiographical, since he’s a stand-up comic turned movie star; while doing promotion for his new film, he opens his life to a reporter (Rosario Dawson) who joins him on a literal tour of his past. Gabrielle Union plays his fiancée in a cast that also includes JB Smoove, Cedric the Entertainer and a number of familiar faces in cameos as themselves. (R: AS. N, P) (Also on Blu-ray) “EXODUS: GODS AND KINGS”: Director Ridley Scott likes making movies on a big scale (“Blade Runner,” “Gladiator”), and he gets another opportunity with this drama – shown in 3-D theatrically – that traces Moses’ (Christian Bale) quest to free hundreds of thousands of slaves from Egyptian rule. His principal foe is Ramses (Joel Edgerton), the legendary pharaoh. Additional cast members include Aaron Paul (“Breaking Bad”), John Turturro, Ben Kingsley and Scott’s "Alien” star, Sigourney Weaver. DVD extras: audio commentary by Scott and co-screenwriter Jeffrey Caine; deleted and extended scenes. (PG-13: AS, V) (Also on Blu-ray) “PENGUINS OF MADAGASCAR”: The title characters are spun off from the successful animated-movie series into their own film, as Skipper, Kowalski, Rico and Private (voices of Tom McGrath, Chris Miller, Conrad Vernon and Christopher Knights) do nothing less than try to save the world by stopping a global plot involving others of their own kind. At the same time, they have to deal with a vengeful octopus (voice of John Malkovich). The voice cast includes Benedict Cumberbatch, Ken Jeong, Andy Richter and celebrated filmmaker Werner Herzog. DVD extras: theatrical trailer; two “making-of” documentaries; photo gallery. (PG: AS) (Also on Blu-ray) “MAUDE: THE COMPLETE SERIES”: Bea Arthur was known largely for theater work before producer Norman Lear cast her as a strong-willed relative of Archie Bunker on “All in the Family,” leading to this spinoff series that made its own waves … often to the great concern of CBS’ censors. Maude Findlay makes no bones about expressing her opinions, which often clash with those of husband Walter (Bill Macy) and daughter Carol (Adrienne Barbeau). Arthur won an Emmy for the show, which teamed her with supporting player Rue McClanahan years before they would reunite on “The Golden Girls.” Conrad Bain also is featured, and Esther Rolle – who played housekeeper Florida Evans – also got her own spinoff, “Good Times.” (Not rated: AS, P) “TURN: WASHINGTON’S SPIES – THE COMPLETE FIRST SEASON”: The fact-inspired AMC drama series – about spies during the Revolutionary War – focuses on the Culper Ring, an unlikely espionage group of patriots who helped fight back after the British reclaimed such areas as Long Island and Staten Island. Jamie Bell (“Billy Elliot”), Heather Lind and Angus Macfadyen are among the stars, with Washington himself played by Ian Kahn. A second season of the show is coming. (Not rated: AS, V) (Also on Blu-ray)
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Bet your bottom dollar, the latest screen incarnation of a certain orphan is on DVD and Blu-ray today.

"View From the Couch"
By Jay Bobbin​

“ANNIE”: It’s still a hard-knock life for the orphaned character in this revision of the hit musical inspired by the classic comic strip. Quvenzhané Wallis (“Beasts of the Southern Wild”) has the title role, with Jamie Foxx as this version’s Daddy Warbucks, a cellular tycoon named “Will Stacks” … but there’s a sinister Miss Hannigan that remains on board, played this time by Cameron Diaz. The score also is intact, including such standards as “Maybe” and (of course) “Tomorrow.” Rose Byrne, Bobby Cannavale and David Zayas (“Dexter”) are among co-stars, and several famous faces turn up in cameos. DVD extras: "making-of" documentary; audio commentary by director and co-screenwriter Will Gluck; music video. (PG: AS, P) (Also on Blu-ray and On Demand)

“TOP FIVE”: Chris Rock generally had been off the movie radar for a while when he came back big-time as writer, director and star of this smart comedy that takes its shots at the concept of – and perils of – fame.  Rock’s character clearly is semiautobiographical, since he’s a stand-up comic turned movie star; while doing promotion for his new film, he opens his life to a reporter (Rosario Dawson) who joins him on a literal tour of his past. Gabrielle Union plays his fiancée in a cast that also includes JB Smoove, Cedric the Entertainer and a number of familiar faces in cameos as themselves. (R: AS. N, P) (Also on Blu-ray)

“EXODUS: GODS AND KINGS”: Director Ridley Scott likes making movies on a big scale (“Blade Runner,” “Gladiator”), and he gets another opportunity with this drama – shown in 3-D theatrically – that traces Moses’ (Christian Bale) quest to free hundreds of thousands of slaves from Egyptian rule. His principal foe is Ramses (Joel Edgerton), the legendary pharaoh. Additional cast members include Aaron Paul (“Breaking Bad”), John Turturro, Ben Kingsley and Scott’s "Alien” star, Sigourney Weaver. DVD extras: audio commentary by Scott and co-screenwriter Jeffrey Caine; deleted and extended scenes. (PG-13: AS, V) (Also on Blu-ray)

“PENGUINS OF MADAGASCAR”: The title characters are spun off from the successful animated-movie series into their own film, as Skipper, Kowalski, Rico and Private (voices of Tom McGrath, Chris Miller, Conrad Vernon and Christopher Knights) do nothing less than try to save the world by stopping a global plot involving others of their own kind. At the same time, they have to deal with a vengeful octopus (voice of John Malkovich). The voice cast includes Benedict Cumberbatch, Ken Jeong, Andy Richter and celebrated filmmaker Werner Herzog. DVD extras: theatrical trailer; two “making-of” documentaries; photo gallery. (PG: AS) (Also on Blu-ray)

“MAUDE: THE COMPLETE SERIES”: Bea Arthur was known largely for theater work before producer Norman Lear cast her as a strong-willed relative of Archie Bunker on “All in the Family,” leading to this spinoff series that made its own waves … often to the great concern of CBS’ censors. Maude Findlay makes no bones about expressing her opinions, which often clash with those of husband Walter (Bill Macy) and daughter Carol (Adrienne Barbeau). Arthur won an Emmy for the show, which teamed her with supporting player Rue McClanahan years before they would reunite on “The Golden Girls.” Conrad Bain also is featured, and Esther Rolle – who played housekeeper Florida Evans – also got her own spinoff, “Good Times.” (Not rated: AS, P)

“TURN: WASHINGTON’S SPIES – THE COMPLETE FIRST SEASON”: The fact-inspired AMC drama series – about spies during the Revolutionary War – focuses on the Culper Ring, an unlikely espionage group of patriots who helped fight back after the British reclaimed such areas as Long Island and Staten Island. Jamie Bell (“Billy Elliot”), Heather Lind and Angus Macfadyen are among the stars, with Washington himself played by Ian Kahn. A second season of the show is coming. (Not rated: AS, V) (Also on Blu-ray)

Recent Updated: 11 days ago - Created by Jay Bobbin - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Jay Bobbin
Picasa Tribeca Film Festival announces Tribeca Talks line up of speaker! The 2015 Tribeca Film Festival (TFF), presented by AT&T, today announced its lineup for the 2015 Tribeca Talks® series. TFF will feature conversations with some of the industry’s most critically and commercially successful filmmakers, artists, and executives including Christopher Nolan with Bennett Miller, George Lucas with Stephen Colbert, Cary Fukunaga with James Schamus, Brad Bird with Janeane Garofalo, Harvey Weinstein, Gus Van Sant, Courtney Love, Catherine Martin, Christiane Amanpour, and more. The Tribeca Talks panels and events will run during the 14th edition of TFF, taking place April 15–26. TFF also announced four additional feature documentary films that will screen during the Festival as part of the Tribeca Talks: After the Movie series: the world premieres of CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap and The Diplomat, and the New York premieres of Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck and Misery Loves Comedy. Two advance premieres of new episodes from the anticipated Comedy Central series “Inside Amy Schumer” and Netflix’s “Chef’s Table,” one short film, Les Bosquets, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation’s retrospective screening of Good Will Hunting round out the Tribeca Talks: After the Movie series. Tribeca Talks: After the Movie events give audiences the opportunity to watch a film and then listen to a related conversation with filmmakers and industry experts. This year’s Tribeca Talks series offers unique opportunities to hear from some of the top storytellers in the world about filmmaking, film distribution, and media consumption. Programs include the “Tribeca Talks: Directors Series, sponsored by Warner Bros. Pictures” where an acclaimed director participates in an intimate one-on-one conversation; “Tribeca Talks: Master Class” conversations focusing on a specific sector of the filmmaking process; “Tribeca Talks: Script & Screen, hosted by Barnes & Noble” which explores topics related to screenwriting, as well as the previously announced special “Tribeca/ESPN Sports Film Festival Conversations” which presents conversations relating to sports and competition in film, and previously announced “Tribeca Talks Imagination powered by the Hatchery” events featuring discussions with tech thought leaders. “Each year, the conversations we offer are among the Tribeca’s most anticipated and sought-after events and we’re proud of the participants we’re going to hear from this year,” said Executive Vice President of Tribeca Enterprises Paula Weinstein. “These panels offer unique insights into the filmmaking process and give audiences an opportunity to learn from industry leaders across a wide range of subjects and contribute to the conversation.” Listed by category, the 2015 Tribeca Talks events are: “Tribeca Talks: Directors Series, sponsored by Warner Bros. Pictures” will include intimate conversations with: ·      Director and writer Christopher Nolan will review his boundary-pushing work and how he creates entire worlds and realities from his imagination with director Bennett Miller. ·      Legendary director George Lucas discusses his career as a filmmaker, including his work on the Star Wars and Indiana Jones franchises, with Stephen Colbert. ·      Acclaimed TV and film director Cary Fukunaga will explore the elements of creating award-winning works for both the big and small screens with writer and producer James Schamus. ·      Academy Award-winning filmmaker Brad Bird (Ratatouille; The Incredibles; Mission: Impossible- Ghost Protocol) will discuss how he has succeeded in creating both animated and live-action films with Janeane Garofalo. “Tribeca Talks: After the Movie” will include: ·       A sneak peak of the third season of Comedy Central’s “Inside Amy Schumer,” the Emmy®-nominated series that blends scripted, stand-up, and man-on-street interview content; followed by a conversation with executive producer/writer/series star Amy Schumer, and members of the creative and production team including Dan Powell, Jessi Klein, Kevin Kane, Kim Caramele, , Ryan McFaul, and Jonathan Furmanski. ·       The world premiere of The Diplomat, a look at the legacy left by Ambassador Richard Holbrooke, whose diplomatic work spanned from Vietnam to Afghanistan; followed by a conversation with director David Holbrooke, producer Stacey Reiss, CNN’s Christiane Amanpour, and New York Times columnist Roger Cohen. ·         The world premiere of Chef’s Table, a series that showcases the techniques and talents of some of the most well-known international chefs; followed by a conversation with creator David Gelb, episode director Clay Jeter and Blue Hill chef Dan Barber. ·         The world premiere of Very Semi-Serious, a light-hearted look at the artists who create the legendary cartoons for The New Yorker; followed by a conversation with director Leah Wolchok and cartoon editor of the New Yorker Bob Mankoff. ·       The world premiere of CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap, a documentary that exposes the gender gap in software engineering; followed by a conversation with director Robin Hauser Reynolds, Qualcomm chief learning officer Tamar Elkeles, GoDaddy chief people officer Auguste Goldman, and Etsy engineering director for infrastructure Jason Wong. ·       The New York premiere of Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck, an intimate look at Cobain’s life through the lens of home movies, recordings, journals, and artwork; followed by a conversation with director Brett Morgen and film subject Courtney Love. Moderated by Rolling Stone ‘s Neil Strauss. ·       The New York premiere of Misery Loves Comedy, a documentary with well-known comedians who share the painful experiences they’ve encountered while striving for laughs; followed by a conversation with director Kevin Pollak and cast members. ·       For the annual Sloan retrospective salute, a screening of Good Will Hunting, the Academy Award-winning film that follows a janitor who, with the help of a psychology professor, gets his life on the right path; followed by a conversation with director Gus Van Sant and guests. ·       The premiere of Les Bosquets, French artist JR’s short film about his personal experiences in the ghetto of Montfermeil; followed by a conversation with artist JR and dancer Lil Buck. “Tribeca Talks: Master Class” are free events and will feature: Adorama Rental Co. (ARC): The Producers, a conversation with independent film producers about how they overcame all of the logistical and financial obstacles associated with independent filmmaking in order to ensure their art remain authentic. Panelists include Anthony Bregman (Foxcatcher), Matthew Parker (Beasts of the Southern Wild), and Alex Orlovsky (Blue Valentine). Moderated by The Hollywood Reporter’s Tatiana Seigel. ·      Get the Look, an intimate conversation with Academy Award-winning costume designer Catherine Martin (The Great Gatsby; Moulin Rouge; Romeo + Juliet) and Vogue’s International Editor-at-Large Hamish Bowles about how costumes can create the most stunning and memorable moments on film. Dolby Institute: The Sound of the Coens, an exploration of how the sound of the film affects the audience’s reaction to what they are experiencing visually on screen. Panelists include long-time Coen brothers’ composer Carter Burwell (No Country for Old Men; Where the Wild Things Are; A Serious Man) and Academy Award winning Sound Mixer Skip Lievsay (Inside Lleweyn Davis, Gravity, True Grit). Moderated by Director of The Dolby Institute Glenn Kiser. CNN Films: Capture Reality, leading documentary filmmakers reveal how they choose their film subjects and capture their “real lives” on film. Panelists include director Liz Garbus (What Happened, Nina Simone?) director Rachel Boynton (Big Men), and director Roger Ross Williams (God Loves Uganda). Moderated by film critic Eric Hynes. “Tribeca Talks: Script and Screen, hosted by Barnes & Noble” are free events and will include: ·      Act Your Age, a discussion around the many ways filmmakers address themes concerning age, from youth to growing older. Panelists include King Jack director Felix Thompson and Gored director Ido Mizrahy. Moderated by Variety’s Gordon Cox. ·      The Beauty of Angst, a conversation surrounding the emotion of angst and how filmmakers can make audiences relish exploring human angst on screen without going too dark and pushing audiences away. Panelists include Meadowland director Reed Morano, Thank You for Playing co-directors David Osit and Malika Zouhali-Worrall, and Necktie Youth director Sibs Shongwe-La Mer. Moderated by Indiewire’s Eric Kohn. ·      This is the Real Life, a group of documentary and narrative filmmakers will discuss the choices they made to create films based on real events. Panelists include The Adderall Diaries director Pamela Romanowsky, As I Am: The Life and Times of DJ AM director Kevin Kerslake, Men Go Battle director Zachary Treitz and The Wannabe director Nick Sandow. Moderated by The Verge’s Ross Miller. Tribeca Talks Conversations ·      Harvey Weinstein in Conversation, hear from Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein about how he has launched careers, crafted films, and remained at the top of his game. David Rockwell: How Does a Space Tell a Story?, David Rockwell will discuss how the design of a space can affect our experiences, mood and even the work we produce. ·      Immerse Yourself, an examination of how viewers engage themselves physically and psychologically in the ways they consume media; panelists include The Art of Immersion author Frank Rose, The Storytelling Animal author Jonathan Gottschall, and futurist and Shots of Awe creator Jason Silva. Moderated by journalist Jon Erlichman. ·      Secrecy & Power, a discussion about the relationship between power and information and the impacts that result from information leaking; panelists include former spy Valerie Plame, Pulitzer-prize winning journalist Bart Gellman, and director Alex Gibney.
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Tribeca Film Festival announces Tribeca Talks line up of speaker!

The 2015 Tribeca Film Festival (TFF), presented by AT&T, today announced its lineup for the 2015 Tribeca Talks® series. TFF will feature conversations with some of the industry’s most critically and commercially successful filmmakers, artists, and executives including Christopher Nolan with Bennett Miller, George Lucas with Stephen Colbert, Cary Fukunaga with James Schamus, Brad Bird with Janeane Garofalo, Harvey Weinstein, Gus Van Sant, Courtney Love, Catherine Martin, Christiane Amanpour, and more. The Tribeca Talks panels and events will run during the 14th edition of TFF, taking place April 15–26.

TFF also announced four additional feature documentary films that will screen during the Festival as part of the Tribeca Talks: After the Movie series: the world premieres of CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap and The Diplomat, and the New York premieres of Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck and Misery Loves Comedy. Two advance premieres of new episodes from the anticipated Comedy Central series “Inside Amy Schumer” and Netflix’s “Chef’s Table,” one short film, Les Bosquets, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation’s retrospective screening of Good Will Hunting round out the Tribeca Talks: After the Movie series. Tribeca Talks: After the Movie events give audiences the opportunity to watch a film and then listen to a related conversation with filmmakers and industry experts.

This year’s Tribeca Talks series offers unique opportunities to hear from some of the top storytellers in the world about filmmaking, film distribution, and media consumption. Programs include the “Tribeca Talks: Directors Series, sponsored by Warner Bros. Pictures” where an acclaimed director participates in an intimate one-on-one conversation; “Tribeca Talks: Master Class” conversations focusing on a specific sector of the filmmaking process; “Tribeca Talks: Script & Screen, hosted by Barnes & Noble” which explores topics related to screenwriting, as well as the previously announced special “Tribeca/ESPN Sports Film Festival Conversations” which presents conversations relating to sports and competition in film, and previously announced “Tribeca Talks Imagination powered by the Hatchery” events featuring discussions with tech thought leaders.

“Each year, the conversations we offer are among the Tribeca’s most anticipated and sought-after events and we’re proud of the participants we’re going to hear from this year,” said Executive Vice President of Tribeca Enterprises Paula Weinstein. “These panels offer unique insights into the filmmaking process and give audiences an opportunity to learn from industry leaders across a wide range of subjects and contribute to the conversation.”

Listed by category, the 2015 Tribeca Talks events are:

“Tribeca Talks: Directors Series, sponsored by Warner Bros. Pictures” will include intimate conversations with:
·      Director and writer Christopher Nolan will review his boundary-pushing work and how he creates entire worlds and realities from his imagination with director Bennett Miller.
·      Legendary director George Lucas discusses his career as a filmmaker, including his work on the Star Wars and Indiana Jones franchises, with Stephen Colbert.
·      Acclaimed TV and film director Cary Fukunaga will explore the elements of creating award-winning works for both the big and small screens with writer and producer James Schamus.
·      Academy Award-winning filmmaker Brad Bird (Ratatouille; The Incredibles; Mission: Impossible- Ghost Protocol) will discuss how he has succeeded in creating both animated and live-action films with Janeane Garofalo.
“Tribeca Talks: After the Movie” will include:
·       A sneak peak of the third season of Comedy Central’s “Inside Amy Schumer,” the Emmy®-nominated series that blends scripted, stand-up, and man-on-street interview content; followed by a conversation with executive producer/writer/series star Amy Schumer, and members of the creative and production team including Dan Powell, Jessi Klein, Kevin Kane, Kim Caramele, , Ryan McFaul, and Jonathan Furmanski.
·       The world premiere of The Diplomat, a look at the legacy left by Ambassador Richard Holbrooke, whose diplomatic work spanned from Vietnam to Afghanistan; followed by a conversation with director David Holbrooke, producer Stacey Reiss, CNN’s Christiane Amanpour, and New York Times columnist Roger Cohen.
·         The world premiere of Chef’s Table, a series that showcases the techniques and talents of some of the most well-known international chefs; followed by a conversation with creator David Gelb, episode director Clay Jeter and Blue Hill chef Dan Barber.
·         The world premiere of Very Semi-Serious, a light-hearted look at the artists who create the legendary cartoons for The New Yorker; followed by a conversation with director Leah Wolchok and cartoon editor of the New Yorker Bob Mankoff.
·       The world premiere of CODE: Debugging the Gender Gap, a documentary that exposes the gender gap in software engineering; followed by a conversation with director Robin Hauser Reynolds, Qualcomm chief learning officer Tamar Elkeles, GoDaddy chief people officer Auguste Goldman, and Etsy engineering director for infrastructure Jason Wong.
·       The New York premiere of Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck, an intimate look at Cobain’s life through the lens of home movies, recordings, journals, and artwork; followed by a conversation with director Brett Morgen and film subject Courtney Love. Moderated by Rolling Stone ‘s Neil Strauss.
·       The New York premiere of Misery Loves Comedy, a documentary with well-known comedians who share the painful experiences they’ve encountered while striving for laughs; followed by a conversation with director Kevin Pollak and cast members.
·       For the annual Sloan retrospective salute, a screening of Good Will Hunting, the Academy Award-winning film that follows a janitor who, with the help of a psychology professor, gets his life on the right path; followed by a conversation with director Gus Van Sant and guests.
·       The premiere of Les Bosquets, French artist JR’s short film about his personal experiences in the ghetto of Montfermeil; followed by a conversation with artist JR and dancer Lil Buck.

“Tribeca Talks: Master Class” are free events and will feature:
Adorama Rental Co. (ARC): The Producers, a conversation with independent film producers about how they overcame all of the logistical and financial obstacles associated with independent filmmaking in order to ensure their art remain authentic. Panelists include Anthony Bregman (Foxcatcher), Matthew Parker (Beasts of the Southern Wild), and Alex Orlovsky (Blue Valentine). Moderated by The Hollywood Reporter’s Tatiana Seigel.
·      Get the Look, an intimate conversation with Academy Award-winning costume designer Catherine Martin (The Great Gatsby; Moulin Rouge; Romeo + Juliet) and Vogue’s International Editor-at-Large Hamish Bowles about how costumes can create the most stunning and memorable moments on film.
Dolby Institute: The Sound of the Coens, an exploration of how the sound of the film affects the audience’s reaction to what they are experiencing visually on screen. Panelists include long-time Coen brothers’ composer Carter Burwell (No Country for Old Men; Where the Wild Things Are; A Serious Man) and Academy Award winning Sound Mixer Skip Lievsay (Inside Lleweyn Davis, Gravity, True Grit). Moderated by Director of The Dolby Institute Glenn Kiser.
CNN Films: Capture Reality, leading documentary filmmakers reveal how they choose their film subjects and capture their “real lives” on film. Panelists include director Liz Garbus (What Happened, Nina Simone?) director Rachel Boynton (Big Men), and director Roger Ross Williams (God Loves Uganda). Moderated by film critic Eric Hynes.

“Tribeca Talks: Script and Screen, hosted by Barnes & Noble” are free events and will include:
·      Act Your Age, a discussion around the many ways filmmakers address themes concerning age, from youth to growing older. Panelists include King Jack director Felix Thompson and Gored director Ido Mizrahy. Moderated by Variety’s Gordon Cox.
·      The Beauty of Angst, a conversation surrounding the emotion of angst and how filmmakers can make audiences relish exploring human angst on screen without going too dark and pushing audiences away. Panelists include Meadowland director Reed Morano, Thank You for Playing co-directors David Osit and Malika Zouhali-Worrall, and Necktie Youth director Sibs Shongwe-La Mer. Moderated by Indiewire’s Eric Kohn.
·      This is the Real Life, a group of documentary and narrative filmmakers will discuss the choices they made to create films based on real events. Panelists include The Adderall Diaries director Pamela Romanowsky, As I Am: The Life and Times of DJ AM director Kevin Kerslake, Men Go Battle director Zachary Treitz and The Wannabe director Nick Sandow. Moderated by The Verge’s Ross Miller.

Tribeca Talks Conversations
·      Harvey Weinstein in Conversation, hear from Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein about how he has launched careers, crafted films, and remained at the top of his game.
David Rockwell: How Does a Space Tell a Story?, David Rockwell will discuss how the design of a space can affect our experiences, mood and even the work we produce.
·      Immerse Yourself, an examination of how viewers engage themselves physically and psychologically in the ways they consume media; panelists include The Art of Immersion author Frank Rose, The Storytelling Animal author Jonathan Gottschall, and futurist and Shots of Awe creator Jason Silva. Moderated by journalist Jon Erlichman.
·      Secrecy & Power, a discussion about the relationship between power and information and the impacts that result from information leaking; panelists include former spy Valerie Plame, Pulitzer-prize winning journalist Bart Gellman, and director Alex Gibney.

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Picasa Exciting news.  Scientists announce the discovery of Nine newly found Dwarf Satellite Galaxies of the Milky Way in the general proximity of the Magellanic Cloud Galaxies; this is the largest number found at one time! "A team of astronomers from the University of Cambridge have identified nine new dwarf satellites orbiting the Milky Way, the largest number ever discovered at once. The findings, from newly-released imaging data taken from the Dark Energy Survey, may help unravel the mysteries behind dark matter, the invisible substance holding galaxies together. The new results also mark the first discovery of dwarf galaxies - small celestial objects that orbit larger galaxies - in a decade, after dozens were found in 2005 and 2006 in the skies above the northern hemisphere. The new satellites were found in the southern hemisphere near the Large and Small Magellanic Cloud, the largest and most well-known dwarf galaxies in the Milky Way's orbit. The Cambridge findings are being jointly released today with the results of a separate survey by astronomers with the Dark Energy Survey, headquartered at the US Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Both teams used the publicly available data taken during the first year of the Dark Energy Survey to carry out their analysis." Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-03-dwarf-galaxies-orbit-milky.html#jCp The study: "Beasts of the Southern Wild. Discovery of a large number of Ultra Faint satellites in the vicinity of the Magellanic Clouds." http://arxiv.org/abs/1503.02079 Image: The Magellanic Clouds and the Auxiliary Telescopes at the Paranal Observatory in the Atacama Desert in Chile are shown. Only 6 of the 9 newly discovered satellites are present in this image. The other three are just outside the field of view. The insets show images of the three most visible objects (Eridanus 1, Horologium 1 and Pictoris 1) and are 13x13 arcminutes on the sky (or 3000x3000 DECam pixels). Credit: V. Belokurov, S. Koposov (IoA, Cambridge). Photo: Y. Beletsky (Carnegie Observatories)
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Exciting news.  Scientists announce the discovery of Nine newly found Dwarf Satellite Galaxies of the Milky Way in the general proximity of the Magellanic Cloud Galaxies; this is the largest number found at one time!

"A team of astronomers from the University of Cambridge have identified nine new dwarf satellites orbiting the Milky Way, the largest number ever discovered at once. The findings, from newly-released imaging data taken from the Dark Energy Survey, may help unravel the mysteries behind dark matter, the invisible substance holding galaxies together.

The new results also mark the first discovery of dwarf galaxies - small celestial objects that orbit larger galaxies - in a decade, after dozens were found in 2005 and 2006 in the skies above the northern hemisphere. The new satellites were found in the southern hemisphere near the Large and Small Magellanic Cloud, the largest and most well-known dwarf galaxies in the Milky Way's orbit.

The Cambridge findings are being jointly released today with the results of a separate survey by astronomers with the Dark Energy Survey, headquartered at the US Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Both teams used the publicly available data taken during the first year of the Dark Energy Survey to carry out their analysis."

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-03-dwarf-galaxies-orbit-milky.html#jCp

The study: "Beasts of the Southern Wild. Discovery of a large number of Ultra Faint satellites in the vicinity of the Magellanic Clouds." http://arxiv.org/abs/1503.02079

Image: The Magellanic Clouds and the Auxiliary Telescopes at the Paranal Observatory in the Atacama Desert in Chile are shown. Only 6 of the 9 newly discovered satellites are present in this image. The other three are just outside the field of view. The insets show images of the three most visible objects (Eridanus 1, Horologium 1 and Pictoris 1) and are 13x13 arcminutes on the sky (or 3000x3000 DECam pixels). Credit: V. Belokurov, S. Koposov (IoA, Cambridge). Photo: Y. Beletsky (Carnegie Observatories)

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Picasa Hushpuppy and Wink "Beasts of the Southern Wild"
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Hushpuppy and Wink
"Beasts of the Southern Wild"

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Picasa Sugar, Spice and Guts Representation of Female Characters in Movies Is Improving Girls grow up on big and little screens, and sometimes the thinking about girls and girlhood grows, too. Inspired by Richard Linklater’s “Boyhood” — a magnificent film that tells the story of a boy’s life from 6 to 18 — we are taking a look at how girls are growing up in the movies. American mainstream cinema, a timid enterprise dependent on formulas and genres, can be mind-blowingly retrograde when it comes to women and girls. And while an occasional woman or girl rules the box office, too many of their on-screen sisters are sidelined or just left out of the picture. Characters like Katniss Everdeen are changing girlhood and challenging tired stereotypes by not waiting for some guy to save the day: They’re saving themselves and their worlds, too. Yet Katniss, her screen sisters and the industry have a very long way to go. In one study the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media looked at 5,554 “distinct speaking characters” in 122 family movies rated G, PG or PG-13 that were released between 2006 and 2009. The institute discovered that only 29.2 percent of those roles were female, while a whopping 70.8 percent were male. In other words, there were 2.42 male characters for every female one. Put another way, there was Harry and Ron and then there was Hermione, the smartest girl in the class. Hermione ruled, but not nearly enough. In the past, some actresses had a measure of power or at least staying power in Hollywood, but too many more were typecast as bratty sisters, dutiful daughters or sexpots, and then cast aside. And some of their most memorable characters were, like their adult counterparts, defined by hypersexuality or asexuality. Such was the case in 1962, when Dolores Haze, better known as Lolita, was the barely pubescent object of her stepfather’s lust in Stanley Kubrick’s adaptation of the notorious Nabokov novel. That same year, Scout Finch was the object of her father’s moral instruction in the movie version of “To Kill a Mockingbird.” A year later, Betty Friedan’s “The Feminine Mystique” rocked the country, becoming a best-selling portent of second-wave feminism. What has changed in the years since? Quite a lot off screen, if not nearly enough on: Nymphets and tomboys still show up, as do brainy, funny, scary and tough girls. The picture of girlhood at the movies has become an increasingly diverse, sometimes contradictory array of identities, including bold revisions of age-old archetypes and brave new heroines. That said, the faces of these girls remain exasperatingly monochromatic. So all hail Quvenzhané Wallis, who after leading the charge (and earning an Oscar nod) in “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” appears in December as Little Orphan Annie in a remake of the 1982 movie musical. The sun will come out tomorrow — but this time so will the daughter. Here, we take a look at some of the other pixies and powerhouses who are also changing movie girlhood. THE WARRIORS Katniss Everdeen, who returns this fall in “Mockingjay — Part 1,” the third installment in the “Hunger Games” franchise, is so cool, so capable, so focused, with her archer’s eye, on the task in front of her that it’s easy to lose sight of just how revolutionary she is. Not only in the dystopian fictional universe she inhabits, where she has been radicalized by the cruelty of the Hunger Games and the iniquity of the society that supports them. In the world of mass entertainment, too, Katniss is a transformative figure: a solitary warrior, a heroine whose personal struggles for survival and dignity are joined to a larger fight for justice. And also, as played by Jennifer Lawrence, a potent force at the global box office — a blockbuster Joan of Arc. On the movie landscape, Katniss is not entirely alone, though she is still very much outnumbered. In recent years, there have been a handful of movies about young women who can throw a punch, land a kick and run like the wind, girls who are more than sidekicks or pneumatic eye candy. Shailene Woodley’s Tris Prior in “Divergent” — another crossover from the fertile world of young-adult dystopian literature — is, like Katniss, a fighter against corrupt authority. In Joe Wright’s “Hanna” (2011), Saoirse Ronan is a big-eyed, sweet-faced killer, trained in combat by her father. In the culty “Kick-Ass” movies, Chloë Grace Moretz portrays the fearless Hit Girl with a foul mouth and an appetite for combat. The violence there was played partly for laughs and shock value, making the most of the incongruity between the cuteness of the actress and the viciousness of the character, but it also tapped into a deep reservoir of restlessness and rage. For most of movie history — from the old westerns to “Thelma & Louise” by way of exploitation gore-fests like “I Spit on Your Grave” — women’s violence could be justified by narrowly defined motives of self-defense or revenge. The broader battle between right and wrong — and also the pleasure of action for its own sake — have typically been male prerogatives, handed down over the decades from gunslingers to superheroes. The comic-book fraternity has been slow to admit women as full members. Ms. Lawrence has made an impression as the blue-skinned, shape-shifting Mystique (a role originated by Rebecca Romijn-Stamos), but her team is still called the X-Men for a reason. And if women can fight their way toward parity, it will be Katniss who blazed the trail. A.O. SCOTT THE NEW SEARCHERS Journey is one of the most overused words in movie-speak. One reason are guides like “Save the Cat! The Last Book on Screenwriting That You’ll Ever Need!” that borrow heavily from Joseph Campbell, who wrote that whether the hero is “ridiculous or sublime, Greek or barbarian, gentile or Jew, his journey varies little in essential plan.” Too bad that in Campbell’s “monomyth” that journey is also unequivocally male: “The woman is life, the hero its knower and master.” The classic trip has been so historically male that one critic, Eric Leed, gave it a biological spin, labeling it a “spermatic journey.” Never mind that every so often a girl or woman — Dorothy, Thelma, Louise or Hushpuppy — hits the road. She gets out of the house and, like a footloose Penelope, weaves an adventure instead of a shroud. The truth is that women were on the move in movies before talkies, in serials like “The Perils of Pauline” (1914) and westerns like “The Covered Wagon” (1923). Although girls tend to experience more domestic exploits, a few second-wave feminist girls did get out and about, including in “Paper Moon” (1973) and the original “True Grit” (1969). In recent decades, the movie industry hasn’t been much interested in women and girls, so it hasn’t created all that many female-driven escapades. Yet the emergence of new peripatetic girls and women who voyage with purpose and goals — in the latest “True Grit,” “Winter’s Bone,” “Beasts of the Southern Wild” and the coming “Tracks” (Sept. 19) — suggests that our movies may be finally catching up to female Americans on the move. MANOHLA DARGIS SCREAM TEENS Movies have long embraced young freaks and ghouls, those teenage werewolves and other children of the damned, and, in recent years, the young adult book market has helped pump fresh hot blood into the screen. The horror genre goes so well with the adolescent body, after all, both fertile sites churning with strange liquids, violent passions and seemingly inexplicable, terrifying changes. “I want to be normal,” says the spectacularly paranormal Carrie (Chloë Grace Moretz) in the recent remake of the 1976 Brian De Palma freak-out. There’s no chance of normal for Carrie, no matter her era, or for the title character in “Life After Beth,” a young zombie (Aubrey Plaza) whose morbid resurrection turns her into the ultimate clingy girlfriend. “I kind of wish she’d stay dead,” her boyfriend says with a sigh. Having a monster for a boyfriend has metaphoric potential, but it’s also true that these days it’s harder for a white girl to hook up with a black guy than it is to get serious with a super-white vampire (“Twilight”) or suck face with a deadly white zombie (“Warm Bodies”). The Production Code’s ban on “sex relationships between the white and black races” ended in 1956, but in today’s neo-segregationist cinema, blacks and whites rarely mix romantically. So while “Twilight” introduced a Native American heartthrob with Jacob the wolf boy, Bella was always destined to remain on Team Edward. Given our black-and-white obsession with race, it’s no wonder that in the 2013 Southern gothic “Beautiful Creatures” a teenage witch who learns that “no good could come from us loving a mortal.” MANOHLA DARGIS ONCE UPON A TIME RIGHT NOW Disney has been banking on princesses since Snow White warbled “Someday My Prince Will Come” in 1937. Decades later, its sagging fortunes were lifted in 1989 by the animated Ariel, a.k.a. the Little Mermaid, an undersea princess who paved the way for the tiara-wearing likes of Belle, Jasmine and Tiana. In 2000, the company created Disney Princess, what it called a “young girls’ lifestyle brand” that brought together eight of its actual and honorary princesses under one “marketing umbrella.” Since then more princesses have been gathered under that parasol, including Merida from Pixar’s first female-driven movie, “Brave” (2012). Disney bought Pixar in 2006, and it’s hard not to wonder if Pixar’s run of male-driven hits didn’t play into Disney’s fleeting concerns about the whole princess thing. Some of that unease was apparent in Disney’s titling of “Rapunzel,” which it renamed “Tangled” because, according to a 2010 article in The Los Angeles Times, company suits believed — after the disappointing box office returns of “The Princess and the Frog” (2009) — that boys didn’t want to see a movie with “princess” in the title. Maybe not, but to judge by that billion-dollar juggernaut called “Frozen,”
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Sugar, Spice and Guts

Representation of Female Characters in Movies Is Improving

Girls grow up on big and little screens, and sometimes the thinking about girls and girlhood grows, too. Inspired by Richard Linklater’s “Boyhood” — a magnificent film that tells the story of a boy’s life from 6 to 18 — we are taking a look at how girls are growing up in the movies. American mainstream cinema, a timid enterprise dependent on formulas and genres, can be mind-blowingly retrograde when it comes to women and girls. And while an occasional woman or girl rules the box office, too many of their on-screen sisters are sidelined or just left out of the picture.

Characters like Katniss Everdeen are changing girlhood and challenging tired stereotypes by not waiting for some guy to save the day: They’re saving themselves and their worlds, too. Yet Katniss, her screen sisters and the industry have a very long way to go. In one study the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media looked at 5,554 “distinct speaking characters” in 122 family movies rated G, PG or PG-13 that were released between 2006 and 2009. The institute discovered that only 29.2 percent of those roles were female, while a whopping 70.8 percent were male. In other words, there were 2.42 male characters for every female one. Put another way, there was Harry and Ron and then there was Hermione, the smartest girl in the class. Hermione ruled, but not nearly enough.

In the past, some actresses had a measure of power or at least staying power in Hollywood, but too many more were typecast as bratty sisters, dutiful daughters or sexpots, and then cast aside. And some of their most memorable characters were, like their adult counterparts, defined by hypersexuality or asexuality. Such was the case in 1962, when Dolores Haze, better known as Lolita, was the barely pubescent object of her stepfather’s lust in Stanley Kubrick’s adaptation of the notorious Nabokov novel. That same year, Scout Finch was the object of her father’s moral instruction in the movie version of “To Kill a Mockingbird.” A year later, Betty Friedan’s “The Feminine Mystique” rocked the country, becoming a best-selling portent of second-wave feminism.

What has changed in the years since? Quite a lot off screen, if not nearly enough on: Nymphets and tomboys still show up, as do brainy, funny, scary and tough girls. The picture of girlhood at the movies has become an increasingly diverse, sometimes contradictory array of identities, including bold revisions of age-old archetypes and brave new heroines. That said, the faces of these girls remain exasperatingly monochromatic. So all hail Quvenzhané Wallis, who after leading the charge (and earning an Oscar nod) in “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” appears in December as Little Orphan Annie in a remake of the 1982 movie musical. The sun will come out tomorrow — but this time so will the daughter. Here, we take a look at some of the other pixies and powerhouses who are also changing movie girlhood.

THE WARRIORS

Katniss Everdeen, who returns this fall in “Mockingjay — Part 1,” the third installment in the “Hunger Games” franchise, is so cool, so capable, so focused, with her archer’s eye, on the task in front of her that it’s easy to lose sight of just how revolutionary she is. Not only in the dystopian fictional universe she inhabits, where she has been radicalized by the cruelty of the Hunger Games and the iniquity of the society that supports them. In the world of mass entertainment, too, Katniss is a transformative figure: a solitary warrior, a heroine whose personal struggles for survival and dignity are joined to a larger fight for justice. And also, as played by Jennifer Lawrence, a potent force at the global box office — a blockbuster Joan of Arc.

On the movie landscape, Katniss is not entirely alone, though she is still very much outnumbered. In recent years, there have been a handful of movies about young women who can throw a punch, land a kick and run like the wind, girls who are more than sidekicks or pneumatic eye candy. Shailene Woodley’s Tris Prior in “Divergent” — another crossover from the fertile world of young-adult dystopian literature — is, like Katniss, a fighter against corrupt authority. In Joe Wright’s “Hanna” (2011), Saoirse Ronan is a big-eyed, sweet-faced killer, trained in combat by her father. In the culty “Kick-Ass” movies, Chloë Grace Moretz portrays the fearless Hit Girl with a foul mouth and an appetite for combat.

The violence there was played partly for laughs and shock value, making the most of the incongruity between the cuteness of the actress and the viciousness of the character, but it also tapped into a deep reservoir of restlessness and rage. For most of movie history — from the old westerns to “Thelma & Louise” by way of exploitation gore-fests like “I Spit on Your Grave” — women’s violence could be justified by narrowly defined motives of self-defense or revenge. The broader battle between right and wrong — and also the pleasure of action for its own sake — have typically been male prerogatives, handed down over the decades from gunslingers to superheroes.

The comic-book fraternity has been slow to admit women as full members. Ms. Lawrence has made an impression as the blue-skinned, shape-shifting Mystique (a role originated by Rebecca Romijn-Stamos), but her team is still called the X-Men for a reason. And if women can fight their way toward parity, it will be Katniss who blazed the trail. A.O. SCOTT

THE NEW SEARCHERS

Journey is one of the most overused words in movie-speak. One reason are guides like “Save the Cat! The Last Book on Screenwriting That You’ll Ever Need!” that borrow heavily from Joseph Campbell, who wrote that whether the hero is “ridiculous or sublime, Greek or barbarian, gentile or Jew, his journey varies little in essential plan.” Too bad that in Campbell’s “monomyth” that journey is also unequivocally male: “The woman is life, the hero its knower and master.” The classic trip has been so historically male that one critic, Eric Leed, gave it a biological spin, labeling it a “spermatic journey.” Never mind that every so often a girl or woman — Dorothy, Thelma, Louise or Hushpuppy — hits the road. She gets out of the house and, like a footloose Penelope, weaves an adventure instead of a shroud.

The truth is that women were on the move in movies before talkies, in serials like “The Perils of Pauline” (1914) and westerns like “The Covered Wagon” (1923). Although girls tend to experience more domestic exploits, a few second-wave feminist girls did get out and about, including in “Paper Moon” (1973) and the original “True Grit” (1969). In recent decades, the movie industry hasn’t been much interested in women and girls, so it hasn’t created all that many female-driven escapades. Yet the emergence of new peripatetic girls and women who voyage with purpose and goals — in the latest “True Grit,” “Winter’s Bone,” “Beasts of the Southern Wild” and the coming “Tracks” (Sept. 19) — suggests that our movies may be finally catching up to female Americans on the move. MANOHLA DARGIS

SCREAM TEENS

Movies have long embraced young freaks and ghouls, those teenage werewolves and other children of the damned, and, in recent years, the young adult book market has helped pump fresh hot blood into the screen. The horror genre goes so well with the adolescent body, after all, both fertile sites churning with strange liquids, violent passions and seemingly inexplicable, terrifying changes. “I want to be normal,” says the spectacularly paranormal Carrie (Chloë Grace Moretz) in the recent remake of the 1976 Brian De Palma freak-out. There’s no chance of normal for Carrie, no matter her era, or for the title character in “Life After Beth,” a young zombie (Aubrey Plaza) whose morbid resurrection turns her into the ultimate clingy girlfriend. “I kind of wish she’d stay dead,” her boyfriend says with a sigh.

Having a monster for a boyfriend has metaphoric potential, but it’s also true that these days it’s harder for a white girl to hook up with a black guy than it is to get serious with a super-white vampire (“Twilight”) or suck face with a deadly white zombie (“Warm Bodies”). The Production Code’s ban on “sex relationships between the white and black races” ended in 1956, but in today’s neo-segregationist cinema, blacks and whites rarely mix romantically. So while “Twilight” introduced a Native American heartthrob with Jacob the wolf boy, Bella was always destined to remain on Team Edward. Given our black-and-white obsession with race, it’s no wonder that in the 2013 Southern gothic “Beautiful Creatures” a teenage witch who learns that “no good could come from us loving a mortal.”
MANOHLA DARGIS

ONCE UPON A TIME RIGHT NOW

Disney has been banking on princesses since Snow White warbled “Someday My Prince Will Come” in 1937. Decades later, its sagging fortunes were lifted in 1989 by the animated Ariel, a.k.a. the Little Mermaid, an undersea princess who paved the way for the tiara-wearing likes of Belle, Jasmine and Tiana. In 2000, the company created Disney Princess, what it called a “young girls’ lifestyle brand” that brought together eight of its actual and honorary princesses under one “marketing umbrella.” Since then more princesses have been gathered under that parasol, including Merida from Pixar’s first female-driven movie, “Brave” (2012). Disney bought Pixar in 2006, and it’s hard not to wonder if Pixar’s run of male-driven hits didn’t play into Disney’s fleeting concerns about the whole princess thing.

Some of that unease was apparent in Disney’s titling of “Rapunzel,” which it renamed “Tangled” because, according to a 2010 article in The Los Angeles Times, company suits believed — after the disappointing box office returns of “The Princess and the Frog” (2009) — that boys didn’t want to see a movie with “princess” in the title. Maybe not, but to judge by that billion-dollar juggernaut called “Frozen,”

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Picasa This young actress is seen in Annie, and Beasts of the Southern Wild. 2014 may be ending, but 2015 is coming. I know she will find her name in 2015. I can be something. That's what she taught me. #Quvenzhané wallis #Inspiration
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This young actress is seen in Annie, and Beasts of the Southern Wild. 2014 may be ending, but 2015 is coming. I know she will find her name in 2015. I can be something. That's what she taught me.
#Quvenzhané wallis #Inspiration

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Picasa ‘Annie': Movie review Every parent of school-aged children will hit a day, over the next three weeks, when they want to throw in the towel. That’s when this uneven “Annie” reboot, starring Jamie Foxx and Quvenzhané Wallis, will come in handy. Kids will enjoy it, and adults desperate for a new activity will endure it. In 1982, critics savaged John Huston’s attempt to bring this adored musical to the big screen. But children loved it because, as this intermittently misguided effort proves, it’s impossible to ruin the allure of great tunes, plucky kids and heartfelt fantasies. Director Will Gluck (“Easy A”) and co-screenwriter Aline Brosh McKenna (“27 Dresses”) have made some smart updates, like turning Annie from wide-eyed, Depression-era orphan into a savvy foster kid. It’s also nice to see their multicultural cast, given that too many family films are still so lacking in diversity. Barry Wetcher Stacks (Jamie Foxx) and Annie (Quvenzhane Wallis) spend some time together in “Annie.” Our heroine (Wallis, a 2013 Oscar nominee for “Beasts of the Southern Wild”) lives in Harlem with mean Ms. Hannigan (Cameron Diaz), who makes her money boarding foster girls. Fortunately, Annie gets a guardian upgrade when she meets mayoral candidate Will Stacks (Jamie [...] http://newsnyork.com/annie-movie-review-2/
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‘Annie': Movie review

Every parent of school-aged children will hit a day, over the next three weeks, when they want to throw in the towel. That’s when this uneven “Annie” reboot, starring Jamie Foxx and Quvenzhané Wallis, will come in handy. Kids will enjoy it, and adults desperate for a new activity will endure it. In 1982, critics savaged John Huston’s attempt to bring this adored musical to the big screen. But children loved it because, as this intermittently misguided effort proves, it’s impossible to ruin the allure of great tunes, plucky kids and heartfelt fantasies. Director Will Gluck (“Easy A”) and co-screenwriter Aline Brosh McKenna (“27 Dresses”) have made some smart updates, like turning Annie from wide-eyed, Depression-era orphan into a savvy foster kid. It’s also nice to see their multicultural cast, given that too many family films are still so lacking in diversity. Barry Wetcher Stacks (Jamie Foxx) and Annie (Quvenzhane Wallis) spend some time together in “Annie.” Our heroine (Wallis, a 2013 Oscar nominee for “Beasts of the Southern Wild”) lives in Harlem with mean Ms. Hannigan (Cameron Diaz), who makes her money boarding foster girls. Fortunately, Annie gets a guardian upgrade when she meets mayoral candidate Will Stacks (Jamie [...]
http://newsnyork.com/annie-movie-review-2/

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Picasa Best film since Beasts of the Southern Wild
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Best film since Beasts of the Southern Wild
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Picasa #TheAcademy : Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012), with the Oscar-nominated Quvenzhané Wallis (standing, center), and Dwight Henry (standing, back to the camera). ... http://buff.ly/1wKGwPv for_More
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#TheAcademy : Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012), with the Oscar-nominated Quvenzhané Wallis (standing, center), and Dwight Henry (standing, back to the camera). ... http://buff.ly/1wKGwPv for_More
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Picasa +Luci Fer John Doe No. 24 BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD Official Trailer (2012) [HD] Life of Pi Soundtrack - Pi's Lullaby - English Sub-Titles +Rashida Jones Jeremiah 8:1-3 NLT “In that day,” says the Lord +Luci Fer, “the enemy will break open the graves of the kings and officials of Judah, and the graves of the priests, prophets, and common people of Jerusalem. They will spread out their bones on the ground before the sun, moon, and stars—the gods my people have loved, served, and worshiped. Their bones will not be gathered up again or buried but will be scattered on the ground like manure. And the people of this evil nation who survive will wish to die rather than live where I will send them--Hell. I, the Lord +Luci Fer of Heaven’s +Rashida Jones Armies, have spoken!
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+Luci Fer John Doe No. 24 BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD Official Trailer (2012) [HD] Life of Pi Soundtrack - Pi's Lullaby - English Sub-Titles +Rashida Jones

Jeremiah 8:1-3 NLT

“In that day,” says the Lord +Luci Fer, “the enemy will break open the graves of the kings and officials of Judah, and the graves of the priests, prophets, and common people of Jerusalem.

They will spread out their bones on the ground before the sun, moon, and stars—the gods my people have loved, served, and worshiped. Their bones will not be gathered up again or buried but will be scattered on the ground like manure.

And the people of this evil nation who survive will wish to die rather than live where I will send them--Hell. I, the Lord +Luci Fer of Heaven’s +Rashida Jones Armies, have spoken!

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Picasa #TheAcademy : Quvenzhane Wallis, who at 9 years old, became the youngest person ever to be nominated for Best Actress for her role in Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012).. Find us on--->>http://buff.ly/1ol19Ms
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#TheAcademy : Quvenzhane Wallis, who at 9 years old, became the youngest person ever to be nominated for Best Actress for her role in Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012).. Find us on--->>http://buff.ly/1ol19Ms
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Picasa When you watch 'Beasts of the Southern Wild', 'The Fault in Our Stars', or another sad/happycrying movie
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When you watch 'Beasts of the Southern Wild', 'The Fault in Our Stars', or another sad/happycrying movie
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Picasa Experience Beasts of the Southern Wild live in London next week! There'll be two live music performances of one of the most extraordinary films to come from America in the last few years happening at London's Barbican Hall on the 30th and 31st July. The New York Times described Beasts of the Southern Wild as 'a blast of sheer, improbable joy, a boisterous, thrilling action movie and a passionate and unruly explosion of Americana, which winks at skepticism, laughs at sober analysis and stares down criticism.' Composer Dan Romer and director/co-composer Benh Zeitlin have perfectly captured the film’s southern bayou heartbeat with a lovely mix of mystical and traditional Louisiana music that echo the strange world of this gorgeous film, which you can see on a huge screen with the two composers and the Serious Orchestra, conducted by Ryan McAdams, playing the acclaimed score live. Tickets: http://bit.ly/1t4arTo
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Experience Beasts of the Southern Wild live in London next week!

There'll be two live music performances of one of the most extraordinary films to come from America in the last few years happening at London's Barbican Hall on the 30th and 31st July. The New York Times described Beasts of the Southern Wild as 'a blast of sheer, improbable joy, a boisterous, thrilling action movie and a passionate and unruly explosion of Americana, which winks at skepticism, laughs at sober analysis and stares down criticism.'

Composer Dan Romer and director/co-composer Benh Zeitlin have perfectly captured the film’s southern bayou heartbeat with a lovely mix of mystical and traditional Louisiana music that echo the strange world of this gorgeous film, which you can see on a huge screen with the two composers and the Serious Orchestra, conducted by Ryan McAdams, playing the acclaimed score live.

Tickets: http://bit.ly/1t4arTo

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Picasa The Rocket Review. Rating: 5/5. If there was any part of Beasts of the Southern Wild that I loved the most it would be the idea that anything can be made to look exciting and delightful through the eyes of a child. The film worked because it shined a light on the sense of imagination we had lost by growing up and The Rocket reminds us in a very similar way that imagination and dreaming can http://bit.ly/1mZXKpe
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The Rocket Review. Rating: 5/5. If there was any part of Beasts of the Southern Wild that I loved the most it would be the idea that anything can be made to look exciting and delightful through the eyes of a child. The film worked because it shined a light on the sense of imagination we had lost by growing up and The Rocket reminds us in a very similar way that imagination and dreaming can http://bit.ly/1mZXKpe
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Picasa An inside look into the development of the screenplay for Beasts of the Southern Wild at the Sundance Lab. http://www.bluecatscreenplay.com/blog/inside-the-sundance-lab-beasts-of-the-southern-wild/
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An inside look into the development of the screenplay for Beasts of the Southern Wild at the Sundance Lab.

http://www.bluecatscreenplay.com/blog/inside-the-sundance-lab-beasts-of-the-southern-wild/

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Picasa Congrats to Quvenzhane Wallis (Beasts of the Southern Wild) for being named Face Of Armani Junior, making her the “first major child celebrity to be the face of a luxury brand.”
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Congrats to Quvenzhane Wallis (Beasts of the Southern Wild) for being named Face Of Armani Junior, making her the “first major child celebrity to be the face of a luxury brand.”
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Picasa Quvenzhané Wallis Named New Face Of Armani Junior With a sure-to-be-hit movie “Annie” out soon and plenty of industry cred to her name, Quvenzhane Wallis shouldn’t be surprised by high-profile offers, regardless of the realm. The 10-year-old “Beasts of the Southern Wild” starlet was chosen to front the new Armani Junior ad campaign and she couldn’t be happier. Quvenzhane shared, "I'm so happy to be chosen by Mr. Armani to be his ambassador for Armani Junior. I felt the same excitement when I got cast for a major film. Me? Wow! I was honored to wear his custom gown to the Oscars. It made me feel like a princess. When I saw Mr. Armani's Prive' show in New York, the dresses were so pretty . . . I had too many favorites. Afterwards when I met him, I realized Mr. Armani is such a nice man. I liked that that he was so thoughtful. It's fun to wear Armani Junior since I really like the clothes. It's young. It's cool. My friends are going to want to borrow all my clothes." And Giorgio Armani is confident Miss Wallis is the perfect fit. "Quvenzhane is so talented, despite her young age. Her kindness, curiosity and openness towards others really struck me, as they are all traits I admire. It is for this very reason that I wanted her to be the face of Armani Junior. With her insatiable energy, Quvenzhane made the clothing come alive, interpreting it in her own singular way."
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Quvenzhané Wallis Named New Face Of Armani Junior

With a sure-to-be-hit movie “Annie” out soon and plenty of industry cred to her name, Quvenzhane Wallis shouldn’t be surprised by high-profile offers, regardless of the realm.

The 10-year-old “Beasts of the Southern Wild” starlet was chosen to front the new Armani Junior ad campaign and she couldn’t be happier.

Quvenzhane shared, "I'm so happy to be chosen by Mr. Armani to be his ambassador for Armani Junior. I felt the same excitement when I got cast for a major film. Me? Wow! I was honored to wear his custom gown to the Oscars. It made me feel like a princess. When I saw Mr. Armani's Prive' show in New York, the dresses were so pretty . . . I had too many favorites. Afterwards when I met him, I realized Mr. Armani is such a nice man. I liked that that he was so thoughtful. It's fun to wear Armani Junior since I really like the clothes. It's young. It's cool. My friends are going to want to borrow all my clothes."

And Giorgio Armani is confident Miss Wallis is the perfect fit. "Quvenzhane is so talented, despite her young age. Her kindness, curiosity and openness towards others really struck me, as they are all traits I admire. It is for this very reason that I wanted her to be the face of Armani Junior. With her insatiable energy, Quvenzhane made the clothing come alive, interpreting it in her own singular way."

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Picasa The new face of Armani Junior: Quvenzhane Wallis Ten-year-old Quvenzhane Wallis, star of Beasts of the Southern Wild and the youngest Oscar nominee of all time, has been named the face of Armani Junior, Giorgio Armani’s line for children and teens. She is the first major child celebrity to be the face of a luxury brand.
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The new face of Armani Junior: Quvenzhane Wallis

Ten-year-old Quvenzhane Wallis, star of Beasts of the Southern Wild and the youngest Oscar nominee of all time, has been named the face of Armani Junior, Giorgio Armani’s line for children and teens. She is the first major child celebrity to be the face of a luxury brand.

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Picasa the lead role in the independent film that cost only a million dollars, "Beasts of the Southern Wild" and which earned an Oscar nomination for "Best Actress".
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the lead role in the independent film that cost only a million dollars, "Beasts of the Southern Wild" and which earned an Oscar nomination for "Best Actress".
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Picasa My favorite movie is " Beasts of the Southern Wild." I cried like a baby at the end.
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My favorite movie is " Beasts of the Southern Wild." I cried like a baby at the end.
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Picasa As some of you may have gleaned, I've written my first book. Finally. The book is "The $11 Billion Year: From Sundance to the Oscars, an Inside Look at the Changing Hollywood System" and will be published by Newmarket Press for It Books/an imprint of HarperCollins, on March 4. I'm putting together various book signings, talks and parties in New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles, among other places, in the coming months. Stay tuned for details. Why did I write this? Inspired by William Goldman's classic book, "The Season," about one year on Broadway, I have long wanted to write an in-depth, informed chronicle of what goes on within one year inside the motion picture industry from my reporter's point of view. I believed it could provide insights and a behind-the-scenes perspective on every aspect of the business of movies like no other book had done before. The 2012 slate provided me the perfect opportunity to take on this challenge, resulting in "The $11 Billion Year." It was tough. Is it a business book? It's like the blog-it's intended to inform smart film lovers about the inner workings of the movie industry. In nine chapters-plus an afterword, photo insert, glossary, and box office charts I follow the transformative year 2012, from the Sundance Film Festival to the Oscars, just as I covered it here, but with more more in-depth reporting. I show how the global business of Hollywood really works by detailing the making and marketing of movies, from low-budget indies to studio blockbusters, the players, winners, and losers. Starting at Sundance in January, I follow the eventual nine Best Picture contenders through their long road to the Oscars. I cover the indies and their new distribution models at Sundance. Why did "Beasts of the Southern Wild" become the darling of the festival? What might the exhibitors' jockeying at Cinema-Con, the studio summer tentpole showcases at Comic-Con and the fall's "smart" films and BIG films of the holiday season introduced at Telluride, Toronto, and New York Festivals have to do with making or breaking a film's chances? How did Harvey Weinstein's maneuvers at the international scene at Cannes benefit "Django Unchained" and "Silver Linings Playbook"? Looking at "Zero Dark Thirty," how are women filmmakers and movies about women faring, are things improving? I show the the glamour of the Oscars. Why did "Argo" beat "Lincoln" for Best Picture? What are the nine movies? "Beasts of the Southern Wild," "Amour," "Life of Pi," "Lincoln," "Silver Linings Playbook," "Zero Dark Thirty," "Django Unchained," "Les Miserables," and "Argo." Plus a look at some Oscar-bound documentaries and foreign films and Hollywood's love affair with franchises and comic book movies. What sets this book part from all the other Hollywood books? I'm dealing with recent history and movies folks may have heard of, using these films as a window into examining the Hollywood machine at work, from script development and production to marketing and distribution, as studios decide on their release strategies, schmooze with media influencers, and face the myriad challenges now facing the industry, including declining DVD sales, soaring production and marketing costs, escalating box office ticket prices, shorter exhibition windows, and the incredible impact of the digital revolution-from 3D to VOD and IMAX. How can I buy it? You can pre-order the book at  Amazon, iBookstore, Barnes & Noble, Indiebound, Books-A-Million , or Google, or you can ask your local independent bookstore to order it. The publisher is HarperCollins and the ISBN-13 is: 9780062218018. More info on the book (http://www.harpercollins.com/books/11-Billion-Year-Anne-Thompson/?isbn=9780062218032). How can I order a copy for possible review or interview? You can contact HarperCollins publicity manager Joseph Papa at Joseph.Papa@HARPERCOLLINS.com. Can I book a Q & A or book signing or a 2012 flick at a movie theater or bookstore? Sure, contact Joseph. I hope you like the book. It's a picture of my world.
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As some of you may have gleaned, I've written my first book. Finally.

The book is "The $11 Billion Year: From Sundance to the Oscars, an Inside Look at the Changing Hollywood System" and will be published by Newmarket Press for It Books/an imprint of HarperCollins, on March 4. I'm putting together various book signings, talks and parties in New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles, among other places, in the coming months. Stay tuned for details.

Why did I write this?

Inspired by William Goldman's classic book, "The Season," about one year on Broadway, I have long wanted to write an in-depth, informed chronicle of what goes on within one year inside the motion picture industry from my reporter's point of view. I believed it could provide insights and a behind-the-scenes perspective on every aspect of the business of movies like no other book had done before. The 2012 slate provided me the perfect opportunity to take on this challenge, resulting in "The $11 Billion Year." It was tough.

Is it a business book?

It's like the blog-it's intended to inform smart film lovers about the inner workings of the movie industry. In nine chapters-plus an afterword, photo insert, glossary, and box office charts I follow the transformative year 2012, from the Sundance Film Festival to the Oscars, just as I covered it here, but with more more in-depth reporting. I show how the global business of Hollywood really works by detailing the making and marketing of movies, from low-budget indies to studio blockbusters, the players, winners, and losers.

Starting at Sundance in January, I follow the eventual nine Best Picture contenders through their long road to the Oscars. I cover the indies and their new distribution models at Sundance. Why did "Beasts of the Southern Wild" become the darling of the festival? What might the exhibitors' jockeying at Cinema-Con, the studio summer tentpole showcases at Comic-Con and the fall's "smart" films and BIG films of the holiday season introduced at Telluride, Toronto, and New York Festivals have to do with making or breaking a film's chances? How did Harvey Weinstein's maneuvers at the international scene at Cannes benefit "Django Unchained" and "Silver Linings Playbook"? Looking at "Zero Dark Thirty," how are women filmmakers and movies about women faring, are things improving? I show the the glamour of the Oscars. Why did "Argo" beat "Lincoln" for Best Picture?

What are the nine movies?

"Beasts of the Southern Wild," "Amour," "Life of Pi," "Lincoln," "Silver Linings Playbook," "Zero Dark Thirty," "Django Unchained," "Les Miserables," and "Argo." Plus a look at some Oscar-bound documentaries and foreign films and Hollywood's love affair with franchises and comic book movies.

What sets this book part from all the other Hollywood books?

I'm dealing with recent history and movies folks may have heard of, using these films as a window into examining the Hollywood machine at work, from script development and production to marketing and distribution, as studios decide on their release strategies, schmooze with media influencers, and face the myriad challenges now facing the industry, including declining DVD sales, soaring production and marketing costs, escalating box office ticket prices, shorter exhibition windows, and the incredible impact of the digital revolution-from 3D to VOD and IMAX.

How can I buy it?

You can pre-order the book at  Amazon, iBookstore, Barnes & Noble, Indiebound, Books-A-Million , or Google, or you can ask your local independent bookstore to order it. The publisher is HarperCollins and the ISBN-13 is: 9780062218018. More info on the book (http://www.harpercollins.com/books/11-Billion-Year-Anne-Thompson/?isbn=9780062218032).

How can I order a copy for possible review or interview?

You can contact HarperCollins publicity manager Joseph Papa at Joseph.Papa@HARPERCOLLINS.com.

Can I book a Q & A or book signing or a 2012 flick at a movie theater or bookstore?

Sure, contact Joseph.

I hope you like the book. It's a picture of my world.

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Picasa Beasts Of The Southern Wild - 2012
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Beasts Of The Southern Wild - 2012
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Picasa JLaw, Justin, and Miley Make Forbes 30 Under 30 List for 2014 -Forbes Magazine announced their 30 Under 30 list and it is filled with young entertainers. Jennifer Lawrence, Miley Cyrus, Justin Bieber, Katy Perry, Lady Gaga, Bruno Mars and Lorde are among those named by experts in 15 different fields.  Beasts of the Southern Wild actress Quvenzhane Wallis was the youngest on the list – she is only 10 years old!
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JLaw, Justin, and Miley Make Forbes 30 Under 30 List for 2014 -Forbes Magazine announced their 30 Under 30 list and it is filled with young entertainers. Jennifer Lawrence, Miley Cyrus, Justin Bieber, Katy Perry, Lady Gaga, Bruno Mars and Lorde are among those named by experts in 15 different fields.  Beasts of the Southern Wild actress Quvenzhane Wallis was the youngest on the list – she is only 10 years old!
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