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Most recent 19 results returned for keyword: tyler clementi (Search this on MAP)

https://plus.google.com/106071624220263756659 Cicero Dusk : "Tyler Clementi, age 18; Billy Lucas, age 15; Harrison Chase Brown, age 15; Cody J. Barker, age 17; ...
"Tyler Clementi, age 18; Billy Lucas, age 15; Harrison Chase Brown, age 15; Cody J. Barker, age 17; Seth Walsh, age 13; Felix Sacco, age 17; Asher Brown, age 13; Caleb Nolt, age 14; Raymond Chase, age 19..."

That moment when those names are read during the song Make it Stop (September's Children) by Rise Against...😢😭
5 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/106071624220263756659 Cicero Dusk : "Tyler Clementi, age 18; Billy Lucas, age 15; Harrison Chase Brown, age 15; Cody J. Barker, age 17; ...
"Tyler Clementi, age 18; Billy Lucas, age 15; Harrison Chase Brown, age 15; Cody J. Barker, age 17; Seth Walsh, age 13; Felix Sacco, age 17; Asher Brown, age 13; Caleb Nolt, age 14; Raymond Chase, age 19..."

That moment when those names are read during the song Make it Stop (September's Children) by Rise Against...😢😭
5 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/104592826565265804313 Turtle Creek Chorale : Turtle Creek Chorale presents, "Brave," October 17-18, 2014 at the Latino Cultural Center. Brave will...
Turtle Creek Chorale presents, "Brave," October 17-18, 2014 at the Latino Cultural Center.

Brave will feature the regional premiere of “Tyler’s Suite,” a choral song-cycle that pays tribute to Tyler Clementi, the 18-year-old student who took his life three years ago due to bullying. The concert will also feature men of the Turtle Creek Chorale and community artists as they share, through music, their personal stories of bravery and hope.
7 days ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/102260310960730526678 A Place Called Home : WHY ANTI-GAY BULLYING IS A THEOLOGICAL ISSUE When I heard about the death of 15-year-old Billy Lucas...
WHY ANTI-GAY BULLYING IS A THEOLOGICAL ISSUE

When I heard about the death of 15-year-old Billy Lucas early in September, I was terribly saddened. It is a tragedy when a young person completes suicide in the aftermath of daily torment and harassment. After this, I sat in stunned silence in front of my computer screen as news stories continued to appear about the suicides of 13-year-old Asher Brown, 18-year-old Tyler Clementi, 13-year-old Seth Walsh, and 19-year-old Raymond Chase. Today, it is very clear to me that profound sadness and stunned silence is no longer a suitable, appropriate, or adequate response.

From Lamentation to Indignation

My sadness began to change into something different with each successive news story about another gay teen hanging himself, shooting himself, or jumping off a bridge. As I saw the faces of these young victims and imagined the family and friends left to cope with the chaos created by their suicides, my lamentation began to morph into an indignant fury.

My indignation grew as I shifted my gaze from the individual acts of suicide to the contexts in which these suicides are set. Suicide happens for numerous reasons. Some seek relief from enduring physical and psychological pain that seems infinitely unrelenting and others after severe bouts of depression. These teens, however, were not seeking relief from some persistent, internal state of depression or physical illness. The pain they faced had an external source: the cruel, unremitting, merciless pounding of daily humiliation, taunting, harassment, and violence.

And all of this pain visited upon these young lives because of one thing they had in common: they were not heterosexual.

These suicides are not acts of “escape,” or a “cop-out” from facing life. When LGBT people resort to suicide, they are responding to far more than the pain of a few individual insults or humiliating occurrences. When LGBT people commit suicide it is an extreme act of resistance to an oppressive and unjust reality in which every LGBT person is always and everywhere at risk of becoming the target of violence solely because of sexual orientation or gender identity. They are acts of resistance to a perceived reality in which a lifetime of violence and abuse seems utterly unavoidable.

The landscape upon which LGBT teen suicide is set calls for far more than our sympathy and sadness. There are times in which it is important to be guided to action by our anger. This is one of those times.

From Interpersonal Violence to Group Subjugation

Our response to bullying is a response to violence. Beyond the inflicting of individual pain, violence against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people has effects far beyond the individual target. This is what Iris Marion Young terms “systematic violence” in her famous “Five Faces of Oppression.” It is a violence of instrumentality—violence with the effect of keeping an entire group subjugated and in a state of oppression.

Young argues, “Members of some groups live with the knowledge that they must fear random, unprovoked attacks on their persons or property, which have no motive but to damage, humiliate, or destroy the person”.* The only thing one must do to become victimized is to be a member of a particular group (e.g. to be gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender). We must widen our perspective from individual acts of bullying and violence to the instrumental purpose these serve in subjugating LGBT people to particular religious and cultural ideologies in which reality is defined from a strictly heterosexual perspective—and gay and lesbian people become non-persons.

As more churches and denominations ordain gay and lesbian clergy, more gay and lesbian people are featured in media, and more medical, psychological and psychotherapeutic organizations reject notions of the pathological in sexual minorities, dominant religious and cultural ideology is in a state of crisis. It is no longer an unquestioned assumption that heterosexual experience represents the definition of reality for all people. The power to define reality for the masses is at stake and this power comes with all manner of political and ideological implications. Thus, there is a vested interest on the part of the religious and political right in keeping LGBT persons silent and subjugated.

Whereas political rallying on issues like same-sex marriage and the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell serve to maintain some ground on the preservation of anti-gay cultural ideology, the intermittent reinforcement of violent attack is an even better tool to ensure the silence (and suicide) of LGBT people and their subjugation to the closet.

While a majority of LGBT people may avoid ever becoming the victim of a violence, none will be able to avoid the psychic terror that is visited upon LGBT people with each reminder that this world is one in which people are maimed and killed because of their sexual and gender identities. It is this psychic terror that makes life so difficult for many LGBT people. It is this psychic terror that does the heavy lifting of instrumental, systematic violence. It intends to silence and to destroy from within.

While most of us will never be physically attacked by another human being, all of us know we are targets.

A Theology of Anti-Gay Bullying

Anti-gay bullying is a theological issue because it has a theological base. I find it difficult to believe that even those among us with a vibrant imagination can muster the creative energy to picture a reality in which anti-gay violence and bullying exist without the anti-gay religious messages that support them.

These messages come in many forms, degrees of virulence, and volumes of expression. The most insidious forms, however, are not those from groups like Westboro Baptist Church. Most people quickly dismiss this fanaticism as the red-faced ranting of a fringe religious leader and his small band of followers.

More difficult to address are the myriad ways in which everyday churches that do a lot of good in the world also perpetuate theologies that undergird and legitimate instrumental violence. The simplistic, black and white lines that are drawn between conceptions of good and evil make it all-too-easy to apply these dualisms to groups of people. When theologies leave no room for ambiguity, mystery and uncertainty, it becomes very easy to identify an “us” (good, heterosexual) versus a “them” (evil, gay).

Additionally, hierarchical conceptions of value and worth are implicit in many of our theological notions. Needless to say, value and worth are not distributed equally in these hierarchies. God is at the top, (white, heterosexual) men come soon after and all those less valued by the culture (women, children, LGBT people, the poor, racial minorities, etc.) fall somewhere down below. And it all makes perfect sense if you support it with a few appropriately (mis)quoted verses from the Bible.

With dualistic conceptions of good and evil and hierarchical notions of value and worth, it becomes easy to know who it is okay to hate or to bully or, seemingly more benignly, to ignore. And no institutions have done more to create and perpetuate the public disapproval of gay and lesbian people than churches.

If anti-gay bullying has, at any level, an embodied undercurrent of tacit theological legitimation, then we simply cannot circumvent our responsibility to provide a clear, decisive, theological response. Aside from its theological base, anti-gay bullying is a theological issue because it calls for acts of solidarity on behalf of the vulnerable and justice on behalf of the oppressed.

But this imperative to respond reminds us that the most dangerous form of theological message comes in the subtlest of forms: silence.

The Longer We Wait, the More Young People Die

There is already a strong religious presence in the debate around anti-bullying education in schools. Unfortunately, it is not a friendly voice for LGBT teens. There is also no lack of rhetoric on sexuality stemming from theological sources. But the loudest voices are not the voices of affirmation and embrace. In a recent article, I urged churches that rest comfortably in a tacitly welcoming or pseudo-affirming position to come out and publicly proclaim their places of worship as truly welcoming and affirming sanctuaries for people of diverse sexual orientations and gender identities.

I cannot count the number of times I have heard well-meaning, good-hearted people respond to this appeal, saying, “Things are a lot better for gay people today than they were several years (or decades) ago. In time, our society (or churches) will come around on this issue.” To these friends and others, I must say, “It’s time.” For Lucas, Brown, Clementi, Walsh, and Chase the time is up. For these teens and the myriad other bisexual, transgender, lesbian and gay youth lost to suicide, the waiting game hasn’t worked so well.

As simply as I can state the matter: The longer we wait to respond, the more young people die.

If this were a hostage situation, we would have dispatched the SWAT team by now. And in many ways, it is. Our children and teenagers are being held hostage by a religious and political rhetoric that strives to maintain the status quo of anti-gay heterosexist normativity. The messages of Focus on the Family and other organizations actively strive to leave the most vulnerable among us exposed to continuous attack. The good news is that we don’t need a SWAT team. We just need quality education on sexuality and gender identity in our schools and more faithful and courageous preaching and teaching in our churches.

Catholic theologian M. Shawn Copeland offers profound words to any individuals and churches seeking to wash their hands of this issue. She states,

If my sister or brother is not at the table, we are not the flesh of Christ. If my sister’s mark of sexuality must be obscured, if my brother’s mark of race must be disguised, if my sister’s mark of culture must be repressed, then we are not the flesh of Christ. For, it is through and in Christ’s own flesh that the ‘other’ is my sister, is my brother; indeed, the ‘other’ is me…

If anti-gay bullying is a theological issue, perhaps what is called for is a creative theological response. A theological response that challenges the systematic violence that upholds an oppressive religious and cultural ideology will not be a response through which we can hedge our bets. It will be a full-bodied, wholehearted giving of ourselves to the repair of the flesh of Christ divided by injustice and systematic exclusion.

Ministers who remain in comfortable silence on sexuality must speak out. Churches that have silently embraced gay and lesbian members for years must publically hang the welcome banner. How long will we continue to limit and qualify our messages of acceptance, inclusion and embrace for the most vulnerable in order to maintain the comfort of those in our communities of faith who are well-served by the status quo?

In the current climate, equivocating messages of affirmation are overpowered by the religious rhetoric of hatred. Silence only serves to support the toleration of bullying, violence, and exclusion. In the face of what has already become the common occurrence of LGBT teen suicide, how long can we wait to respond?

*Young, Justice and the Politics of Difference. p. 61

**Copeland, Enfleshing Freedom. p. 82
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-5E16vVk3m4w/U8aPYZSc9LI/AAAAAAAALZg/U8sIzKDXQ7Y/w506-h750/pope+on+homosexuality.jpg
8 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/112557765028825303077 Mark Roberts : WHY ANTI-GAY BULLYING IS A THEOLOGICAL ISSUE When I heard about the death of 15-year-old Billy Lucas...
WHY ANTI-GAY BULLYING IS A THEOLOGICAL ISSUE

When I heard about the death of 15-year-old Billy Lucas early in September, I was terribly saddened. It is a tragedy when a young person completes suicide in the aftermath of daily torment and harassment. After this, I sat in stunned silence in front of my computer screen as news stories continued to appear about the suicides of 13-year-old Asher Brown, 18-year-old Tyler Clementi, 13-year-old Seth Walsh, and 19-year-old Raymond Chase. Today, it is very clear to me that profound sadness and stunned silence is no longer a suitable, appropriate, or adequate response.

From Lamentation to Indignation

My sadness began to change into something different with each successive news story about another gay teen hanging himself, shooting himself, or jumping off a bridge. As I saw the faces of these young victims and imagined the family and friends left to cope with the chaos created by their suicides, my lamentation began to morph into an indignant fury.

My indignation grew as I shifted my gaze from the individual acts of suicide to the contexts in which these suicides are set. Suicide happens for numerous reasons. Some seek relief from enduring physical and psychological pain that seems infinitely unrelenting and others after severe bouts of depression. These teens, however, were not seeking relief from some persistent, internal state of depression or physical illness. The pain they faced had an external source: the cruel, unremitting, merciless pounding of daily humiliation, taunting, harassment, and violence.

And all of this pain visited upon these young lives because of one thing they had in common: they were not heterosexual.

These suicides are not acts of “escape,” or a “cop-out” from facing life. When LGBT people resort to suicide, they are responding to far more than the pain of a few individual insults or humiliating occurrences. When LGBT people commit suicide it is an extreme act of resistance to an oppressive and unjust reality in which every LGBT person is always and everywhere at risk of becoming the target of violence solely because of sexual orientation or gender identity. They are acts of resistance to a perceived reality in which a lifetime of violence and abuse seems utterly unavoidable.

The landscape upon which LGBT teen suicide is set calls for far more than our sympathy and sadness. There are times in which it is important to be guided to action by our anger. This is one of those times.

From Interpersonal Violence to Group Subjugation

Our response to bullying is a response to violence. Beyond the inflicting of individual pain, violence against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people has effects far beyond the individual target. This is what Iris Marion Young terms “systematic violence” in her famous “Five Faces of Oppression.” It is a violence of instrumentality—violence with the effect of keeping an entire group subjugated and in a state of oppression.

Young argues, “Members of some groups live with the knowledge that they must fear random, unprovoked attacks on their persons or property, which have no motive but to damage, humiliate, or destroy the person”.* The only thing one must do to become victimized is to be a member of a particular group (e.g. to be gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender). We must widen our perspective from individual acts of bullying and violence to the instrumental purpose these serve in subjugating LGBT people to particular religious and cultural ideologies in which reality is defined from a strictly heterosexual perspective—and gay and lesbian people become non-persons.

As more churches and denominations ordain gay and lesbian clergy, more gay and lesbian people are featured in media, and more medical, psychological and psychotherapeutic organizations reject notions of the pathological in sexual minorities, dominant religious and cultural ideology is in a state of crisis. It is no longer an unquestioned assumption that heterosexual experience represents the definition of reality for all people. The power to define reality for the masses is at stake and this power comes with all manner of political and ideological implications. Thus, there is a vested interest on the part of the religious and political right in keeping LGBT persons silent and subjugated.

Whereas political rallying on issues like same-sex marriage and the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell serve to maintain some ground on the preservation of anti-gay cultural ideology, the intermittent reinforcement of violent attack is an even better tool to ensure the silence (and suicide) of LGBT people and their subjugation to the closet.

While a majority of LGBT people may avoid ever becoming the victim of a violence, none will be able to avoid the psychic terror that is visited upon LGBT people with each reminder that this world is one in which people are maimed and killed because of their sexual and gender identities. It is this psychic terror that makes life so difficult for many LGBT people. It is this psychic terror that does the heavy lifting of instrumental, systematic violence. It intends to silence and to destroy from within.

While most of us will never be physically attacked by another human being, all of us know we are targets.

A Theology of Anti-Gay Bullying

Anti-gay bullying is a theological issue because it has a theological base. I find it difficult to believe that even those among us with a vibrant imagination can muster the creative energy to picture a reality in which anti-gay violence and bullying exist without the anti-gay religious messages that support them.

These messages come in many forms, degrees of virulence, and volumes of expression. The most insidious forms, however, are not those from groups like Westboro Baptist Church. Most people quickly dismiss this fanaticism as the red-faced ranting of a fringe religious leader and his small band of followers.

More difficult to address are the myriad ways in which everyday churches that do a lot of good in the world also perpetuate theologies that undergird and legitimate instrumental violence. The simplistic, black and white lines that are drawn between conceptions of good and evil make it all-too-easy to apply these dualisms to groups of people. When theologies leave no room for ambiguity, mystery and uncertainty, it becomes very easy to identify an “us” (good, heterosexual) versus a “them” (evil, gay).

Additionally, hierarchical conceptions of value and worth are implicit in many of our theological notions. Needless to say, value and worth are not distributed equally in these hierarchies. God is at the top, (white, heterosexual) men come soon after and all those less valued by the culture (women, children, LGBT people, the poor, racial minorities, etc.) fall somewhere down below. And it all makes perfect sense if you support it with a few appropriately (mis)quoted verses from the Bible.

With dualistic conceptions of good and evil and hierarchical notions of value and worth, it becomes easy to know who it is okay to hate or to bully or, seemingly more benignly, to ignore. And no institutions have done more to create and perpetuate the public disapproval of gay and lesbian people than churches.

If anti-gay bullying has, at any level, an embodied undercurrent of tacit theological legitimation, then we simply cannot circumvent our responsibility to provide a clear, decisive, theological response. Aside from its theological base, anti-gay bullying is a theological issue because it calls for acts of solidarity on behalf of the vulnerable and justice on behalf of the oppressed.

But this imperative to respond reminds us that the most dangerous form of theological message comes in the subtlest of forms: silence.

The Longer We Wait, the More Young People Die

There is already a strong religious presence in the debate around anti-bullying education in schools. Unfortunately, it is not a friendly voice for LGBT teens. There is also no lack of rhetoric on sexuality stemming from theological sources. But the loudest voices are not the voices of affirmation and embrace. In a recent article, I urged churches that rest comfortably in a tacitly welcoming or pseudo-affirming position to come out and publicly proclaim their places of worship as truly welcoming and affirming sanctuaries for people of diverse sexual orientations and gender identities.

I cannot count the number of times I have heard well-meaning, good-hearted people respond to this appeal, saying, “Things are a lot better for gay people today than they were several years (or decades) ago. In time, our society (or churches) will come around on this issue.” To these friends and others, I must say, “It’s time.” For Lucas, Brown, Clementi, Walsh, and Chase the time is up. For these teens and the myriad other bisexual, transgender, lesbian and gay youth lost to suicide, the waiting game hasn’t worked so well.

As simply as I can state the matter: The longer we wait to respond, the more young people die.

If this were a hostage situation, we would have dispatched the SWAT team by now. And in many ways, it is. Our children and teenagers are being held hostage by a religious and political rhetoric that strives to maintain the status quo of anti-gay heterosexist normativity. The messages of Focus on the Family and other organizations actively strive to leave the most vulnerable among us exposed to continuous attack. The good news is that we don’t need a SWAT team. We just need quality education on sexuality and gender identity in our schools and more faithful and courageous preaching and teaching in our churches.

Catholic theologian M. Shawn Copeland offers profound words to any individuals and churches seeking to wash their hands of this issue. She states,

If my sister or brother is not at the table, we are not the flesh of Christ. If my sister’s mark of sexuality must be obscured, if my brother’s mark of race must be disguised, if my sister’s mark of culture must be repressed, then we are not the flesh of Christ. For, it is through and in Christ’s own flesh that the ‘other’ is my sister, is my brother; indeed, the ‘other’ is me…

If anti-gay bullying is a theological issue, perhaps what is called for is a creative theological response. A theological response that challenges the systematic violence that upholds an oppressive religious and cultural ideology will not be a response through which we can hedge our bets. It will be a full-bodied, wholehearted giving of ourselves to the repair of the flesh of Christ divided by injustice and systematic exclusion.

Ministers who remain in comfortable silence on sexuality must speak out. Churches that have silently embraced gay and lesbian members for years must publically hang the welcome banner. How long will we continue to limit and qualify our messages of acceptance, inclusion and embrace for the most vulnerable in order to maintain the comfort of those in our communities of faith who are well-served by the status quo?

In the current climate, equivocating messages of affirmation are overpowered by the religious rhetoric of hatred. Silence only serves to support the toleration of bullying, violence, and exclusion. In the face of what has already become the common occurrence of LGBT teen suicide, how long can we wait to respond?

*Young, Justice and the Politics of Difference. p. 61

**Copeland, Enfleshing Freedom. p. 82
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-5E16vVk3m4w/U8aPYZSc9LI/AAAAAAAALZg/U8sIzKDXQ7Y/w506-h750/pope+on+homosexuality.jpg
9 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/105498730372310747760 Loudr : This highly-anticipated release comes from the legendary SFGMC - The San Francisco Gay Men's Chorus...
This highly-anticipated release comes from the legendary SFGMC - The San Francisco Gay Men's Chorus, the world’s first openly gay chorus, one of its largest, and the group most often credited with creating the LGBT choral movement. We recommend picking up this album, not merely to own a small piece of piece of history (in the form of a live recording of the world premiere of Tyler’s Suite), but to lose yourself in a multi-movement work about the story of Tyler Clementi, composed beautifully by the likes of Stephen Schwartz.

http://tumblr.loudr.fm/post/91789413162/as-featured-on-itunes-an-illuminating-new-album-from
As Featured On iTunes: An Illuminating New Album From The Legendary San Francisco Gay Men's Chorus
This highly-anticipated release comes from the legendary San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus (SFGMC), the world’s first openly gay chorus, one of its largest, and the group most often credited with...
10 days ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/110927807739411225624 Megan Meier Foundation : Read what Tyler Clementi's parents have to say about the cyberbullying law in NY gets overturned http...
Read what Tyler Clementi's parents have to say about the cyberbullying law in NY gets overturned http://ow.ly/yULJp
Parents of gay cyberbullying victim denounce overturn of New York's cyberbullying law
Parents of Tyler Clementi, who committed suicide after his roomate broadcast his sexual encounter, have condemned the repeal of New York's anti-cyberbullying law saying young people are the 'most vuln
16 days ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/108830710803311867523 Megan Meier Foundation : Read what Tyler Clementi's parents have to say about the cyberbullying law in NY gets overturned http...
Read what Tyler Clementi's parents have to say about the cyberbullying law in NY gets overturned http://ow.ly/yULJp
Parents of gay cyberbullying victim denounce overturn of New York's cyberbullying law
Parents of Tyler Clementi, who committed suicide after his roomate broadcast his sexual encounter, have condemned the repeal of New York's anti-cyberbullying law saying young people are the 'most vuln
16 days ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/100152506836387182192 Corey Price : By Tom van Laer, ESCP Europe Estimates show that millions of people have been victims of cyberbullying...
By Tom van Laer, ESCP Europe Estimates show that millions of people have been victims of cyberbullying. Sadly, this includes the famous cases where emotional distress caused Tyler Clementi, Izzy Dix, Lisa Marie Zahra, and dozens of other victims to take…
Social media users won’t fight cyberbullying until they imagine what it’s like to be bullied: study - Breaking Christian News and Opinion on CNMnewz.com
By Tom van Laer, ESCP Europe Estimates show that millions of people have been victims of cyberbullying. Sadly, this includes the famous cases where emotional distress caused Tyler Clementi, Izzy Dix, Lisa Marie Zahra, and dozens of other victims to take their own lives. These bullies are present on almost all Internet forums, but some websites are particularly notorious. For instance, a recent Time magazine article described Ask.fm as a website t...
16 days ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/108819517676673061692 Melinda Santilli : In early October 2010, Canadian teenager Brittany McMillan promulgated the observance of a new commemoration...
In early October 2010, Canadian teenager Brittany McMillan promulgated the observance of a new commemoration called Spirit Day, the first observance of which took place on October 20, 2010, it now however takes place on October 17. On this day people wear the color purple to show support for LGBT youth who are victims of bullying.
Promoted by GLAAD, many Hollywood celebrities wore purple on this day to show their support of this cause, and many websites added a prominent purple shade to their design.
The name Spirit Day comes from the purple stripe of the Rainbow flag, whose creator Gilbert Baker defined it as "representing 'spirit'".
The observance was inaugurated in response to a rash of widely publicized bullying-related suicides of gay school students in 2010, including that of Tyler Clementi.
(Wikipedia)

Big brother +Timothy Johnson I have an idea: what do you think if we open posts and discussion the wekk of 17th October and we celebrate the Spirit Day also in our community?

ps: do you know why I didn't knew anything about this day?
Because in Italy nobody celebrate it, what a shame!
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-71TpD10z5hg/U7rN-mNFZgI/AAAAAAAAItM/IP12YJnSVoA/w506-h750/purple_spirit_day_by_dandakobajai-d317gdi.png
18 days ago - Via Community - View -
https://plus.google.com/107375115918815093640 MySoCalledGayLife.com : News Update : Tyler Clementi's Parents React To NYC Court's Failure To Properly Enact Measure Aimed ...
News Update : Tyler Clementi's Parents React To NYC Court's Failure To Properly Enact Measure Aimed At Eliminating Cyber Bullying http://owl.li/2JxfGO
Tyler Clementi's Parents React To NYC Court's Failure To Properly Enact Measure Aimed At Eliminating Cyber Bullying - MySoCalledGayLife.com
"In our work against cyberbullying, we are seeing the great pain and permanent emotional harm that cyberbullying causes to children." said Jane and Joseph Clementi, the parents of Tyler Clementi and the chairs of the Tyler Clementi Foundation.
22 days ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/111961910168203796225 MySoCalledGayLife.co.uk : Tyler Clementi's Parents React To NYC Court's Failure To Properly Enact Measure Aimed At Eliminating...
Tyler Clementi's Parents React To NYC Court's Failure To Properly Enact Measure Aimed At Eliminating Cyber Bullying http://ht.ly/2Jxf05
ht.ly/2Jxf05
Ow.ly 1 minute ago from. Tweet Share Top Tweets Rating: (+1)
22 days ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/104592826565265804313 Turtle Creek Chorale : As our 2013-2014 Laughter & Love season comes to a close, the Dallas-based Turtle Creek Chorale mens...
As our 2013-2014 Laughter & Love season comes to a close, the Dallas-based Turtle Creek Chorale mens singing chorus welcomes the debut of their new season, kicking off in October 2014 with a tribute to Tyler Clementi, a story of bravery and hope. http://ow.ly/ypCLY
Turtle Creek Chorale
The Turtle Creek Chorale of Dallas Texas is a 225-voice men's chorus. The chorus is known for its virtuosity, musicality and stunning performances covering light to classical men's choral music as heard in all our recordings.
1 month ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/105455174487292738783 Arik B. Fetscher : "the seven types of unguiculation, which is to say the art of using the nails to enhance the act of ...
"the seven types of unguiculation, which is to say the art of using the nails to enhance the act of love."
Enchantress of Florence (Its also in Hunger games) #nailart

Just picking out some old emails on a rainy day.


From: Arik Fetscher <af56@me.com>
Date: April 2, 2012 at 4:07:55 PM EDT
To: "jobs@france24.com" <jobs@france24.com>, "fhollande@assemblee-nationale.fr" <fhollande@assemblee-nationale.fr>, "cnnmoney@money.com" <cnnmoney@money.com>, "candidate.relations@turner.com" <candidate.relations@turner.com>, "melissa@melissaharrisperry.com" <melissa@melissaharrisperry.com>
Subject: Unguiculation

The joining of various seemingly different groups like a civil rights activism and the so called t party. Well in skittles and ice tea the groups can find common ground. It is not the services or size of government, that has and will always be a red herring issue. The anger is about the idea that some are perceived to be above the law. It began with Nixon and his very famous state,ent that if a president does it it cannt be illegal. The nation has fought and been divided by that thinking ever since. When a person is shot unarmed younger and with less physical strength, to most Americans there is a simple presumption that questions need to be asked. Clothed in authority or not, when a serviceman kills afghans in the course of war we readily acknowledge that an investigation is necessary, is the issue different on our streets here in the US?

The enthusiasm of the t party was about making officials and large donors and those in power or given authority accountable for their actions. The notion that taxation or the rights of citizens should be taken into account no matter from where they come or who they are that it is an inherent right of every citizen to be given the full rights, opportunity and access to the protections afforded every other citizen. It is human rights that forms the stable foundation from which all positive opportunities emerge. While some advocate a status quo and try to direct the discussion into dead ends like healthcare is about abortion when they would actually benefit from the majority of the bill, or that Trayvon is simply racial when it's really about the health and safety of very child being able to safely walk the street, that Tyler clementi was about a gay student when it was really about any person being free from bigotry and hate. That to have focused on black, gay or gender was to have exposed the fatal flaw in that line of thinking. As each of these cases gain attention it swells the ranks of those seeing that these are not isolated issues but in one some or each and all we see a part of ourselves, the ability to single out any one group or one issue to divide does not work as it is only strengthening the idea that human rights when fought for any one group benefit all groups.

If one misses the point of recent Israeli elections its plain that fighting for a two state solution is not enough by itself. Halal/kosher meat and a case that amounts to book burning should wake up some of the more reticent and foggy of vision israelites and French. If a scientist visits a website and carries on a discussion does that make him a proponent, and if certain information is now deemed illegal to even see or discuss haven't we begun burning books in the name of safety? I don't support much of what is said but why arrest the scientist and not the one actually writing the information? This is all eerily reminiscent of the current and past when a group of a few in the name of security and maintenance of the status quo for fear of not enough get the rest to fight for the crumbs that are left. The hunger games is just such a modern retelling of that story. In civil rights in the US, Jim crow laws were used to blame the freed blacks for economic problems and to just go back the way it was without the uppity types. It's been the Jews, in America and France now Latinos/Mexicans and Muslims stealing jobs receiving aid and welfare costing the rest money. The arguements of class social divisions are old and simply being used again only the targets different. Then those that question are "monstered" a term used by news corp for those choosing to question the logic and reasoning.

I for one would like to walk down the street and not get shot or have the police called, do research and advance peace without being labelled a terrorist, eat safe meat and don't particularly want to know the method of slaughter if it's humane by law whether biblical or codified. We can either advance the possibilities for integration and look for ways to benefit or insulate and exacerbate divisions and history has shown how increasing divisions has as a general rule always led to war eventually. I, for one, would prefer to see zidane at a middle east resort, opening up tourism for football fans during the winter break and off season as a way to build opportunities for all than see a scientist studying about clean power arrested for what seems like a law eerily reminiscent of book burning. Prisons jails and cells are places for criminals but often they are also a place where a government sweeps its failings and problems under the rug. A pied noir, an Algerian or French or is it possible that humanity trumps much of the distinction and there is opportunity to build rather than find fault and blame? Fusion is to huddle the masses, I believe that such is a real power scientific artistic and spiritual.

The pope Vatican iii or Jerusalem II and the opening of Cuba increased belief in education opportunity and all healthcare rather than just focusing on the parts that divide. Such works in Israel a single state and representation and the vote such worked at land o lakes and such worked in America and France and is the strength of nations.

An injustice to one is a threat made to all. Montesquieu

Arik Fetscher

PS
Of mad monks and Medici, I choose the latter; of fusion or fission the former.



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For all those beautiful gay people out there. A touching song about the struggles people go through because of who they are. Stay strong. Be proud of who you are. The fight is all but won.

Itgetsbetter.org

"Make It Stop (September's Children)"

Woah, woah.

Bang, bang go the coffin nails, like a breath exhaled,
Then gone forever.
It seems like just yesterday, how did I miss the red flags raised?
Think back to the days we laughed.
We braved these bitter storms together.
Brought to his knees he cried,
But on his feet he died.

What God would damn a heart?
And what God drove us apart?
What God could?

Make it stop.
Let this end.
Eighteen years pushed to the ledge.
It's come to this,
A weightless step.
On the way down singing,
Woah, woah.

Bang, bang from the closet walls,
The schoolhouse halls,
The shotgun's loaded.
Push me and I'll push back.
I'm done asking, I demand.

From a nation under God,
I feel its love like a cattle prod.
Born free, but still they hate.
Born me, no I can't change.

It's always darkest just before the dawn.
So stay awake with me, let's prove them wrong.

Make it stop.
Let this end,
Eighteen years pushed to the ledge.
It's come to this,
A weightless step.
On the way down singing,
Woah, woah.

The cold river washed him away,
But how could we forget?
The gatherings hold candles, but not their tongues.

And too much blood has flown from the wrists,
Of the children shamed for those they chose to kiss.
Who will rise to stop the blood?

We're calling for,
Insisting on, a different beat, yeah.
A brand new song.

Whoa, whoa [x3]
(Tyler Clementi, age 18.
Billy Lucas, age 15.
Harrison Chase Brown, age 15
Cody J. Barker, age 17
Seth Walsh, age 13.)

Make it stop,
Let this end.
This life chose me, I'm not lost in sin.
But proud I stand of who I am,
I plan to go on living.

Make it stop,
Let this end,
All these years pushed to the ledge,
But proud I stand, of who I am,
I plan to go on living

#itgetsbetter #riseagainst #LGBT
Watch the video: Rise Against - Make It Stop (September's Children)
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Music video by Rise Against performing Make It Stop (September's Children). (C) 2011 DGC Records Buy Now! http://bit.ly/uPHJgY
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