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Most recent 18 results returned for keyword: the time machine (Search this on MAP)

https://plus.google.com/112611449987907417382 Trade Flights : The good doctors at Pataphysical Studios have started work on their next madcap invention: the Time ...
The good doctors at Pataphysical Studios have started work on their next madcap invention: the Time Machine. On a sunny Saturday afternoon, we assembled the wood frame of the time machine, which Drs. Rindbrain and Figurine had built earlier at the Tam…
Pataphysical Time Travel
The good doctors at Pataphysical Studios have started work on their next madcap invention: the Time Machine. On a sunny Saturday afternoon, we assembled the wood frame of the time machine, which Drs. Rindbrain and Figurine ha...
44 minutes ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/107874932220821295593 Vadym Graifer : #wheatfree #LCHF #glutenfree Peanut Butter Bread Variation By now it’s probably clear to you that I...
#wheatfree #LCHF #glutenfree Peanut Butter Bread Variation

By now it’s probably clear to you that I view bread as a butter delivery device. That was the role assigned to it in the flax bread and Paleo crackers posts. The thing about butter though is, you can never have enough delivery vehicles for it. Being…
Peanut Butter Bread Variation - The TIME MACHINE DIET
Want to go low carb or on a ketogenic diet? Try this Peanut Butter Bread recipe as a wheat-free, gluten-free and sugar-free bread substitute
3 hours ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/114796284283710914758 Trains Of Thought - Welcome Aboard! : Frame of Mind - Abstraction #45: “The time machine …” via : Image © Sinden Collier ||| : Trains Of Thought...
Frame of Mind - Abstraction #45: “The time machine …”
via : Image © Sinden Collier
||| : Trains Of Thought - Welcome Aboard!
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/--5Na6Dh0Org/WK7rYF3UTMI/AAAAAAAA7bQ/tNs-yYCgaecuL4AN1Mqi1vMadHQlJVI3gCJoC/w506-h750/ec7e2aeb-f2af-4fc4-ab48-1b4e8cd3c431
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https://plus.google.com/112611449987907417382 Trade Flights : The good doctors at Pataphysical Studios have started work on their next madcap invention: the Time ...
The good doctors at Pataphysical Studios have started work on their next madcap invention: the Time Machine. On a sunny Saturday afternoon, we assembled the wood frame of the time machine, which Drs. Rindbrain and Figurine had built earlier at the Tam…
Pataphysical Time Travel
The good doctors at Pataphysical Studios have started work on their next madcap invention: the Time Machine. On a sunny Saturday afternoon, we assembled the wood frame of the time machine, which Drs. Rindbrain and Figurine ha...
5 hours ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/107710248870553809060 mohd.sharique ansari : some interesting way for time travel. a science fiction thought which give us a curiosity. viewers please...
some interesting way for time travel.
a science fiction thought which give us a curiosity.
viewers please watch this and please comment if any questions are there in your mind.
THE TIME MACHINE-A WAY FOR TIME TRAVEL
In our daily life we sometime think that if we can travel in time then we can see our future and then we can find that what we will do in future. Many scientist gives many theory to travel in future or past. There are few wa...
10 hours ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/109923775783112775706 Jessica Hammer : As requested by a friend, here's my top sixteen fiction books of 2016. I disqualified some really great...
As requested by a friend, here's my top sixteen fiction books of 2016. I disqualified some really great stuff for a variety of reasons (it was a re-read, it was a novella, etc.) and there were some great books that didn't quite make the list, so I'll be posting an "other favorites of 2016" supplement soon.

Top Sixteen of 2016
The Dagger and the Coin series, Daniel Abraham (The Dragon’s Path, The King’s Blood, The Tyrant’s Law, The Widow’s House, The Spider’s War)
The Passage series, Justin Cronin (The Passage, The Twelve, The City of Mirrors)
The Crown of Stars series, Kate Elliott (King’s Dragon, Prince of Dogs, The Burning Stone, Child of Flame, The Gathering Storm, In the Ruins, Crown of Stars)
The Neapolitan Quartet, Elena Ferrante (My Brilliant Friend, The Story of a New Name, Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay, The Story of the Lost Child)
The Uninvited, Liz Jensen
The Dream-Quest of Vellitt Boe, Kij Johnson
The Raven and the Reindeer, T. Kingfisher
The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories, Ken Liu
A True Novel, Minae Mizamura
The Sudden Appearance of Hope, Claire North
He, She, and It, Marge Piercy
Revenger, Alastair Reynolds
Aurora, Kim Stanley Robinson
Jews vs. Zombies, ed. Rena Rossner & Lavie Tidhar
The Time Traveler’s Almanac, ed. Ann VanderMeer & Jeff VanderMeer
Zone One, Colson Whitehead

For your reference, here are my reviews (shortened in some cases). Note that differences in review length reflect how busy I was when the review was written, now how much I liked the book!

The Dagger and the Coin series: Abraham’s epic fantasy series has an amazing premise and great characters; it’s also well-executed, well-paced, and avoids the obvious missteps. While I don’t want to give details of what the book is about, major themes include the difference between truth and belief, how social structures are vulnerable to fanaticism, the philosophy of banking, and the value of human kindness under fascism. Abraham keeps a nice tight point-of-view character list, which allows him to let his characters change in response to changing circumstances. The female leads are particularly good. One wins her battles by being brilliant and obsessed, while the other wins them by being kind and socially skilled – and yet they each have critical moments where they must draw on the strengths of the other. I also really enjoyed the main villain, who is a very successful critique of the geek variant of toxic masculinity; Abraham lets you understand the character without excusing him. Gripping and smart!

The Passage series: a mashup of vampire fiction, Westerns, road novels, war stories, and more, these books take place a hundred years after the vampire apocalypse, though with extended flashbacks to the pre- and during-apocalypse periods. Our heroes live in what is apparently the last refuge of humanity, a walled city with a few hundred residents. By day they can live and work safely; by night, patrols and UV lights keep the vampires away. But their batteries are beginning to fail, and change is on the way. Cronin isn’t afraid to bring the hammer down, so to speak; he makes bold changes to his world and to what story he’s telling. For example, at one point in the story he jumps thirty years forward; in another, he gives the heroes access to a major plot element and then does something totally unexpected with it. While he hits a lot of tropes at various points in the story, he pulls them from enough different genres that I never found his choices predictable. He also avoids a lot of the racist, sexist ugliness that comes with post-apocalyptic stories. Although he sometimes screws up (particularly with one of my favorite characters, who disappointingly ends up playing a Magical Negro role), he also does things like casting mixed-race characters as his protagonists; while white characters do join them, they are always marked as outsiders in one way or another. The series almost didn’t make my top-sixteen list because of one chapter late in the third book, which I hate with the burning light of a thousand suns. It undermines the moral argument of the entire series, though I can’t explain exactly how without massive spoilers. Personally, I got over it because a) he spent enough time building said moral argument that I think it was a miscalculation, and b) nothing else depends on said chapter, so I can just headcanon that it’s the character’s fantasy rather than the reality. For that matter it might be and he just executed it badly! But I don’t want you to get to that chapter, should you choose to read the book, and think I didn’t notice. I sure did. But I enjoyed the hell out of the rest of these books, so I coped.

The Crown of Stars series: Elliott’s series is wonderful, and history is one of the biggest things it gets right. It’s inspired by a particular time period (a couple of generations post-Charlemagne), and that specificity drives a lot of the plot. Many of the main characters dream of restoring “Taillefer’s” empire, but there are also subtler elements that are both historically well-constructed and plot-relevant. For example, the king of Wendar spends most of his time on progress, building the loyalty of his people while having them feed his court, and many plot points rely on where he goes, why he goes there, and who can find him when they need to. On the other hand, Elliott isn’t chained by fidelity to either actual history or the “history” that most fantasy writers decide to portray. She imagines a feminist fantasy, in which God is “they,” both male and female; men can be kings, in some countries and under some circumstances, but never the pope; women are stereotyped as being the wise stewards and natural owners of property; and more. She does a lovely job rewriting history with this in mind, and of making it plot-relevant in interesting ways. Marriages, alliances, exploration, and scholarship are as important as war, even though her battle scenes are also really great. Geneaology plays a surprisingly critical role in the series, too, which feels very cool even though she’s a little too fond of the “actually, that thing you thought you knew about your family is wrong” plot twist. She makes some really bold choices, like sending one character on a vision quest for an entire book, and trapping another in the past, but she executes them really successfully. Finally, I was delighted by the ending of the series, which struck the perfect balance between respecting the lived reality of the characters, and showing the process of historical change. If you’re going to read it, you should be prepared for extensive depictions of stalking and abuse, murder, starvation, etcetera. It’s not boringly grimdark, but Elliott does address tragedy and trauma head on. Still, I enjoyed every minute, even when I was shaking my fists at the villains or crying over the tragedies the book portrays!

The Neapolitan Quartet: These are big, brilliant, meaty, thoughtful, passionate, un-put-down-able books that simultaneously succeed as depictions of a rapidly changing Italy; as character portraits of a pair of complicated women; and as “novels of ideas” that address issues of class, gender, politics, duty, family, and more. They follow the life of Lena, a girl from a poor Neapolitan neighborhood who makes it to high school, to university, and finally becomes a famous writer. Meanwhile, her best friend Lila stays behind to build a very different life of her own. Both Lila and Lena are fascinatingly flawed, but Ferrante never falls into the trap of attributing their life outcomes entirely to character. Rather, apparently small differences in life circumstances are amplified throughout their careers – and character is effectively displayed in how they sometimes mitigate, sometimes further amplify those. So, you know, basically your everyday spectacular works of genius.

The Uninvited: Jensen writes thoughtful, unexpected, horrifying disaster novels, and this one is true to form. The book follows an autistic researcher, recently separated from his lover and her young son, who is one of the first people to recognize the onset of worldwide catastrophe. A suicidal factory worker in China, a construction foreman in Dubai, a young girl who commits an act of horrifying violence – they are linked together by a secret that will unravel the world as he knows it. The central disaster, an epidemic of violence by children against adults, is handled without unnecessary grotesquerie, but nonetheless spirals out of control. At the same time, Jensen’s imagined future for these children is a sharp critique of how we treat our own children today. The final reveal, which I won’t spoil for you, is heartbreaking but also hopeful. Avoid this if you dislike images of violence, neglect, and abuse involving children – though the book is never prurient in its handling of the topic, bad things happen both to and because of kids.

The Dream-Quest of Vellitt Boe: a superb quest story in its own right, as a female university professor in a fantasy world must find a student who has gone missing before her college suffers the consequences. As a feminist Lovecraftian countertext, it’s even better.

The Raven and the Reindeer: beautifully melds pragmatism and magical delicacy. It’s a retelling of the Snow Queen story, but Kay is a self-absorbed prick and the Robber Girl kisses Gerta halfway through. (I cheered out loud!) Gerta herself is a lovely creation: stubborn, kind, pragmatic, and often rather in need of a firmly applied clue. Fortunately, her grim companion Mousebones the raven is always prepared to provide mordant humor, and to offer to eat her eyes. To give you a sense of how the book feels, there’s an extended sequence where Gerta must change into a reindeer every morning by donning its dead hide – and the Robber Girl must cut her throat each night to free her. Kingfisher juxtaposes the magic of running a ghostly reindeer road with the blood and filth of reindeer death, and with the trust it takes to let someone you barely know hold a knife to your throat and start cutting. Wonderfully done on all levels.

The Paper Menagerie: fantastic short stories, whose common themes include family, history, identity, and the weight of stories. The title story won a ton of awards, but I’d already read it a number of times; my favorite new discovery was “All the Flavours,” about a little girl who befriends the Chinese god of war in 1870s Idaho.

A True Novel: a Wuthering Heights retelling set in post-war Japan, if Nell behaved ethically, Heathcliff were not a dick, and everyone was on board with polyamory. The Heathcliff-Cathy-Linton trio are well-portrayed, but the real life of the book is in the Nell role, and in the characters who appear in the frame story. Rather, I ought to say frame stories, because there are three. First, “Minae Mizamura” (a semi-fictional version of the author) reminisces about her encounters with Taro Azuma (the Heathcliff character). Next, a young man tells Mizamura about his own Taro Azuma encounters. As part of that story, he recounts a story told to him by Fumiko Tsuchiya (the Nell character). That inner story appears to be the heart of the novel, but looking back the frame stories are critically important. They create a sense of sinking from reality into the fictional, as each moves a critical degree toward a gothic atmosphere until the innermost story seems completely sensible within its own frame. Philosophically, Mizamura is asking the reader to consider what is a “true novel,” and what is the relationship between fact and fiction. The frame stories are narratively satisfying, but they also allow this apparently straightforward (if layered) story to be read as metafictional.

The Sudden Appearance of Hope: a woman whose superpower is that no one can remember her seeks vengeance in the name of a woman who didn’t deserve to die. I read this in one sitting; great action, beautiful characterization, and some very effective satire to boot.

He, She, and It: a retelling of the Golem story, set in a dystopian cyberpunk future where a small Jewish community is challenged with assimilation by a megacorp. Possibly my favorite book of the year.

Revenger: the greatest feminist body-horror pirate revenge space opera I have ever read. Reynolds has shown a trajectory of integrating his favorite sci-fi themes with a deeper and more nuanced sense of character, and it continues in this book.

Aurora: intense political intrigue crossed with an eco-thriller set on a generation ship, told retrospectively by an AI that is slightly confused about what belongs in a story in the first place. There may or may not be something amiss with the main character, who is born just as the ecological balance of the ships irreparably shifts. Nonetheless, she becomes a political leader who must help her community decide what ecological risks they can survive in service of seeding the stars – and whether they will survive as a community while they do so.

Jews vs. Zombies: I’m even more picky about my zombie media than my Arthuriana, but explicitly Jewish speculative fiction is rare enough that I had to read Jews vs. Zombies anyhow. I was incredibly pleasantly surprised – not only was it better than the other volume in the series (Jews vs. Aliens), the short stories were exceptionally strong in their own right. My absolute favorite was “Tractate Metim 28A,” which is written in the form of, you guessed it, a Talmudic tractate dealing with zombies. It’s hard to explain all the many levels on which it is gloriously executed if you haven’t spent time studying Talmud, but it’s worth a read either way. “Zayinim” casts Jews as the only group denied the genetic modifications that eventually turn goyim into zombies; while I don’t think it’s particularly plausible (that’s not really how ant-Semitism works), it does the job of marrying themes of persecution and resistance without falling prey to Holocaust overtones. I also liked “Rise,” in which twelve yeshiva bochers summon up zombie brides. You have never read stories like these (because hi, Christian hegemony!) and you really should.

The Time Travel Almanac: the single best collection of time travel stories I have ever read. So many of the stories are brilliant that I can’t make specific recommendations, but I’ll tell you three things that make the collection as a whole terrific. First, they do a great job of balancing contemporary and historical takes on time travel. They include key classics (“The Time Machine,” “Fire Watch”) without bogging the anthology down in nostalgia. Second, I appreciated the organization of the book into four sections. Although I was skeptical at the beginning, the categories (e.g. “Experiments,” which covers stories about learning to time travel) are broad enough to include a wide variety of stories, but narrow enough to allow you to compare and contrast different takes. Finally, the variety of stories and approaches is wonderful. There are funny stories and tragic stories, stories in which time can be changed and stories in which it can’t, stories about science and stories about magic, you name it. Their inclusive approach – and the way they pace and order the stories – means you can read the whole thing without ever getting bored.

Zone One: one of the most difficult, traumatic, horrifying books I’ve read in a long time, and which is still haunting me. After the zombie apocalypse, Mark Spitz has a job killing leftover zombies in southern Manhattan, the eponymous Zone One, which is the first area to be reclaimed for humanity. The story switches back and forth between the present, where he sweeps buildings clear, banters with his team of equally traumatized buddies, and deals with bureaucracy, and the story of how he survived. Whitehead isn’t afraid to be gruesome, but what makes the book so horrifying is his portrait of trauma, isolation, and grief. The writing is detached and often clinical – for example, Mark observes the ritual exchange of juice boxes by survivors – which I found devastatingly effective at making the world feel real, as well as making me feel the weight of the suffering behind his barely-managed shield. Whitehead is also exceptionally clever as a writer, in that you learn something about Mark toward the end of the book that subtly changes your interpretation of the whole story. If I thought I could ever re-read this book, I think I’d find a lot of double meaning in Mark’s story – but I’m not sure I ever can. Powerful as hell, but read at your own risk.

Happy reading!
16 hours ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/112611449987907417382 Trade Flights : The good doctors at Pataphysical Studios have started work on their next madcap invention: the Time ...
The good doctors at Pataphysical Studios have started work on their next madcap invention: the Time Machine. On a sunny Saturday afternoon, we assembled the wood frame of the time machine, which Drs. Rindbrain and Figurine had built earlier at the Tam…
Pataphysical Time Travel
The good doctors at Pataphysical Studios have started work on their next madcap invention: the Time Machine. On a sunny Saturday afternoon, we assembled the wood frame of the time machine, which Drs. Rindbrain and Figurine ha...
19 hours ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/114155981856684210300 Skylär Astaröt : SiJ explores Time Travel on the album The Time Machine. The Time Machine propels us forwards and backwards...
SiJ explores Time Travel on the album The Time Machine.

The Time Machine propels us forwards and backwards in time. From ancient civilization, where the chatter reverberates in clouded temples. To our impending doom in a future stripped of humanity. A grinding squeal as the paradox cracks reality. At our feet blue skies reflected in a desert of broken mirrors.

Warm soothing field recordings mix with bright overlays and distant instruments. Taking the help of Textere Oris, Particula, Wandering Wind and others, this album is as detailed as it is complex.

For lovers of atmospheric drone and field recording

Written, Produced, Performed -Vladislav Sikach
Artwork & Mastering - Simon Heath
The Time Machine, by SiJ
11 track album
20 hours ago - Via Community - View -
https://plus.google.com/117720468754807321051 Ernie Fink : My 2017 Reading Challenge. I am attempting to read everything from both Jules Verne and H.G.Wells that...
My 2017 Reading Challenge.

I am attempting to read everything from both Jules Verne and H.G.Wells that have been made into movies that I have seen. I have seen all the movies, but never read the books.

So far I've read...

A Tour of the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells

Currently, I am reading The Island of Dr. Moreau by Wells, with an F.P.Walter translation of Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Verne on deck.
1 day ago - Via Community - View -
https://plus.google.com/101616781570067967735 Lee Madeloso : The “unsend” feature is the time machine you always needed. Labels, integrated search, and easy calendar...
The “unsend” feature is the time machine you always needed. Labels, integrated search, and easy calendar editing with +Gmail.
Watch the video: Gmail Gems | The G Suite Show
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Feel as though you're drinking through a firehose when it comes to email management? Jimmy and Lily breakdown a few Gmail tips to help you organize and strea...
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https://plus.google.com/109112903992614379186 PAUL Dodson :

The Time Machine Quotes by H.G. Wells
118 quotes from The Time Machine: ‘Nature never appeals to intelligence until habit and instinct are useless. There is no intelligence where there is no ...
1 day ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/112098663462772287212 Side-Line Magazine : SiJ hits back with 'The Time Machine' on Cryo Chamber - check out the full album preview: read the full...
SiJ hits back with 'The Time Machine' on Cryo Chamber - check out the full album preview: read the full story at http://bit.ly/2ljTxlv . Tags: #CryoChamber, #DreamTwice, #Keosz, #Particula, #SiJ, #TextereOris, #VladislavSikach, #WanderingWind .
SiJ hits back with ‘The Time Machine’ on Cryo Chamber – check out the full album preview – Side-Line Music Magazine
Prolific atmospheric dark ambient artist Vladislav Sikach aka SiJ is back with a brand new album: “The Time Machine“. On “The Time Machine” the Ukrainian artist explores the aspect of time travel bringing you forwards and backwards in time. The material is composed of field recordings mixed with bright overlays and distant instruments. For the recordings Sikach could count on the help of Anna Sikach (track 1 & 2), Stanislav ToSo from Particula (t...
1 day ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/114854883224426233383 Miguel Ordonez : Betty Brosmer, later known by her married name Betty Weider, is an American bodybuilder and physical...
Betty Brosmer, later known by her married name Betty Weider, is an American bodybuilder and physical fitness expert.
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-_uupT2z5e6Y/WKx8d3t3nuI/AAAAAAAB954/bRgOAS-wYasPAfi9nTNZMMfH86EoCJUMgCJoC/w506-h750/17%2B-%2B1
1 day ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/112611449987907417382 Trade Flights : The good doctors at Pataphysical Studios have started work on their next madcap invention: the Time ...
The good doctors at Pataphysical Studios have started work on their next madcap invention: the Time Machine. On a sunny Saturday afternoon, we assembled the wood frame of the time machine, which Drs. Rindbrain and Figurine had built earlier at the Tam…
Pataphysical Time Travel
The good doctors at Pataphysical Studios have started work on their next madcap invention: the Time Machine. On a sunny Saturday afternoon, we assembled the wood frame of the time machine, which Drs. Rindbrain and Figurine ha...
2 days ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/109463641826358407263 Penman678 X : Name: Future Trunks. Age: Can't figure out the age so I'm gonna say early or mid 20's Appearance: See...
Name: Future Trunks.
Age: Can't figure out the age so I'm gonna say early or mid 20's
Appearance: See the picture.
Personality: Serious, Respectful, Cautious, Broody.
Bio: Trunks Brief had a hard life. When he was a kid his Father Vegeta and many of Goku's friends were killed by Android 17 and 18 and the only few that survived were him, Future Gohan, Future Bulma. He trained with Gohan so he can defeat the androids but when he wanted to help one time Gohan knocked him out so he can fight the androids. He died and when Trunks saw his corpse he became angry and turned into a Super Saiyan. For the next few years he trained and tried fighting the androids again and again but failed. His mother then told him that the time machine they worked on was finished so he traveled back in time. If you say I wrote too much there's more to his backstory. He then killed Mecha Frieza and King Cold in the past and tried to help everyone but couldn't win against the Androids from the past and so he trained. Then a monster by the name of Cell came from another timeline that had Trunks win against the androids and Cell killed that Trunks to travel back. He then trained so he can beat Cell and he became strong enough to have a form of Super Saiyan that isn't 2 it's actually called 3rd Grade Super Saiyan and fought against Perfect Cell but lost easily. After that he trained and went to participate in the Cell Games but he watched the matches and fought against the Cell Jr's. After Gohan killed Cell supposedly he then got shot in the chest killing him. He was then revived later when Gohan finished off Cell in his Super Perfect Form. He then went back to the future, killed the Future Androids and killed the Cell in his timeline. I'm not writing more of this guy cause it would take a lot more to type.
Abilities: Able to fly really fast, shoot ki blasts, turn Super Saiyan, 3rd Grade Super Saiyan, Super Saiyan 2 and the unknown form he got in the Black Arc.
Achievements: Killed Cell in his timeline, Android 17 and 18 in his timeline, Fought against Zamasu and Black Goku evenly, killed Dabura and Babibi and prevented the resurrection of Majin Buu.
I'll write the attacks in the comments. 
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-CiGA4D3znPU/WKxIRlqjjxI/AAAAAAAABMk/Plzsa0LiWwcFc-v73tSSorRD0Ma0efRCwCJoC/w506-h750/17%2B-%2B1
2 days ago - Via Community - View -