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Most recent 20 results returned for keyword: robert f kennedy (Search this on MAP)

https://plus.google.com/104983897770768317903 Skye Is The Limit Resume & Career Solutions : “Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.” ~Robert F. Kennedy
“Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.” ~Robert F. Kennedy
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https://plus.google.com/117161439703197995432 Sanjay Kumar : You're happiest while you're making the greatest contribution. ~ Robert F. Kennedy
You're happiest while you're making the greatest contribution.

~ Robert F. Kennedy


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https://plus.google.com/105346668550339436650 John Stone :

Episode 334: Close Call in Kentucky and How Three Ordinary American's Uncovered Foreclosure Fraud - Ring of Fire Radio with Sam Seder, Robert F. Kennedy Jr. and Mike Papantonio -
Heather "Digby" Parton from Hullaballoo, talks to Sam Seder about Primary Results this week, and they will try to recall another Presidential Candidate that has less public service or military record than Donald Trump. And, And David Dayen, will be here to “finally” discuss his new book, ...
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https://plus.google.com/117967071014947019995 Dan Goldstein : Shameful, William Jefferson Clinton AND his wife, both steeped in military madness, and BOTH scarcely...
Shameful, William Jefferson Clinton AND his wife, both steeped in military madness, and BOTH scarcely any better, in MORAL terms, than George W. Bush.
"Some men see things as they are and say why. I dream things that never were and say why not." -Robert F. Kennedy.
I WILL vote for the candidate of MY CHOICE, despite what the people who "validate" the mass-murdering Clintons have to say about it. That right is guaranteed to me in the Constitution, which Billary's fans might take the time to actually READ. The ever-faithful mainstream Dem voters have run out of things to scare me with, especially considering how frequently inaccurate their claims are.

http://www.ornery.org/essays/2001-01-26-1.html
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https://plus.google.com/101081503191682426681 scarlet red : Robert F Kennedy wins over members of the public during his 1968 U.S. presidential campaign
Robert F Kennedy wins over members of the public during his 1968 U.S. presidential campaign
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https://plus.google.com/105164827703833734835 Casey Moore : RFK Robert F. Kennedy University of the Witwatersrand Johannesburg, South Africa June 8th, 1966 I...
RFK
Robert F. Kennedy
University of the Witwatersrand
Johannesburg, South Africa
June 8th, 1966



I have been in your country only a short time; yet you already have made a strong and deep impression. I have flown from Pretoria to Cape Town; going back in three hours over the road which was first covered with great difficulty over many years. I went up the Indian Ocean coast to Durban: and now I return to Johannesburg.

Everywhere I have been impressed with the warmth and the interest of all of the people of South Africa, of all political persuasions and races. Everywhere I have been impressed by your achievements, the wealth you have created in this continent which so sorely needs the blessings of progress.

Above all, I have been impressed with South African youth: not just those young in years, but those of every age who are young in a spirit of imagination and courage and an appetite for the adventure of life.

President Kennedy once said that Averill Harriman, who negotiated the Test-Ban treaty at the age of 72 was the youngest man in Washington. There are many like him here in South Africa.

These young-spirited people are like young people in my country, and all over the world, seeking to build a better future – to make their mark on the tablets of history. They are restless, impatient with the past, with the vain quarrels of a day that is gone; and in this too they are more closely joined with their fellow young people than to the older generation anywhere.

And those who seek change and progress in South Africa are very special.

So many of these I have seen, so many who are in this hall, are standing with their brothers around the globe for liberty and equality and human dignity; not in the ease and comfort and approbation of society, but in midst of controversy and difficulty and risk.

Your fellow students, and men all over the world, will take heart and example from your stand. And that is why your work is so important; for men will flock to the banners of the courageous and the right; but as the Bible tells us: “If the trumpet give an uncertain sound, who shall prepare himself to the battle?”

What is the battle to which we are all summoned?

It is first a battle for the future. The day is long past when any nation could retreat behind walls of stone or curtains of iron or bamboo. The winds of freedom and progress and justice blow across the highest battlements, enter at every crevice, are carried by jet planes and communications satellites and by the very air we breathe.

So tomorrow's South Africa will be different from today's – just as tomorrow's America will be different from the country I left these few short days ago. Our choice is not whether change will come, but whether we can guide that change in the service of our ideals and toward a social order shaped to the needs of all our people. In the long run we can master change not through force or fear, but only through the free work of an understanding mind – through an openness to new knowledge and fresh outlooks which can only strengthen the most fragile and the most powerful human gifts – the gift of reason.

Thus those who cut themselves off from ideas and clashing convictions not only display fear and enormous uncertainty about the strength of their own views; they also guarantee that when change comes, it will not be to their liking. And they encourage the forces of violence and passion which are the only alternatives to reason and the acts of minds freely open to the demands of justice.

Justice – a demand which has echoed down through all the ages of man – this is the second battle to which we are summoned. And let no man think that he fights this battle for others; he fights for himself, and so do we all. The Golden Rule is not sentimentality, but the deepest practical wisdom. For the teaching of our time is that cruelty is contagious, and its disease knows no bounds of race or nation. Where men can be deprived because their skin is black, others may suffer because they believe that men should not be so deprived; and in the fullness of time others will be deprived because their skin is white. If men can suffer because they hold one belief, then others may suffer for the holding of other beliefs.

Freedom is not money, that I could enlarge mine by taking yours. Our liberty can grow only when the liberties of all our fellow men are secure; and he who would enslave others ends only by chaining himself, for chains have two ends, and he who holds the chain is as securely bound as he whom it holds. And as President Kennedy said at the Berlin Wall in 1963, “Freedom is indivisible, and when one man is enslaved, all are not free.”

In the last analysis, as President Kennedy told the American people in 1963, “The heart of the question is whether all men are to be afforded equal rights and equal opportunities, whether we are going to treat our fellow-men as we want to treated.”

“If an American”–or, I would add, any man–if a man, he said “because his skin is dark, cannot eat lunch in a restaurant open to the public, if he cannot send his children to the best public school available, if he cannot vote for the public officials who represent him, if in short, he cannot enjoy the full and free life which all of us want, then who among us would be content to change the colour of his skin and stand in his place?

Who among us would then be content with the counsels of patience and delay?”

It is the question before us in the United States; it is the question before you in South Africa; it is the question before all of us in every corner of the globe.

Will we – within our own countries, and among the mass of struggling humanity –use our advantages to bring help and hope to their outstretched hands?

South Africa is the pre-eminent repository of the skill and knowledge and wealth of this continent.

If you can answer the great questions – if you can sweep unjust privilege into the dead past, if you can show the dispossessed and the diseased, the hungry and the untaught, that there is a better life for them and a fair place in the sun for their children – if you can do these things, then all of us will take heart from your example, and this continent can take its place in the modern world.

But if you cannot do these things, then your shadow will fall long across this continent – and the common cause of men everywhere. in the United States and in South Africa, will be sorely tried and deeply injured.

There are those who say that the game is not worth the candle – that Africa is too primitive to develop, that its peoples are not ready for freedom and self-government, that violence and chaos are unchangeable. But those who say these things should look to the history of every part and parcel of the human race. It was not the black man of Africa who invented and used poison gas or the atomic bomb, who sent six million men and women and children to the gas ovens, and used their bodies as fertilizer. Hitler and Stalin and Tojo were not black men of Africa. And it was not the black men of Africa who bombed and obliterated Rotterdam and Shanghai and Dresden and Hiroshima.

We all struggle to transcend the cruelties and the follies of mankind. That struggle will not be won by standing aloof and pointing a finger; it will be won by action, by men who commit their every resource of mind and body to the education and improvement and help of their fellow man.

And this is the third aspect of our battle: to fight for ourselves as individuals, and for the individuality of all.

We are patriots. We believe in our countries and wish to see them flourish. But the countries we love are not abstractions. They are not frozen in yellowed parchment and constitutions. They are not the sum total of their buildings and shops, wealth and power. We are our nations – you and me and millions like us.

A great American writer, Mark Twain, once answered that question by saying:

“What is the country? It is the common voice of the people. Each – by himself and on his own responsibility – must speak. Each must for himself decide what is right and what is wrong, and which course is patriotic and which is not. Otherwise is to be a traitor, both to yourself and to your country.”

This is the heaviest responsibility of all – a burden men have often refused by turning rule and ideology, belief and power, over to an all-powerful state. History is full of peoples who have discovered it is easier to fight than think, easier to have enemies and friends selected by authority than to make their own painful choices, easier to follow blindly than to lead, even if that leadership must be the private choice of a single man alone with a free and skeptical mind. But in the final telling it is that leadership, the impregnable skepticism of the free spirit, untouchable by guns or police, which feeds the whirlwind of change and hope and progress in every land and time.

So what President Kennedy said to the youth of America, I now say to you:

That it is you who have to decide – you “who have the longest stake, you who are the most concerned for truth, who have the least ties to the present and the greatest ties to the future.”

Here among you, at this great university, I know what your decision will be.
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https://plus.google.com/100681872389368337899 Miss victoria k. dawson williams miss : and this sign on the side walk on wilshire blvd in korea and that includes the public pio pico library...
and this sign on the side walk on wilshire blvd in korea and that includes the public pio pico library and wilshire park plaza and to and from every where including robert f.kennedy inspirational park also......why are screaming at me only....to get off??? miss Victoria kimberly dawson Williams miss
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https://plus.google.com/117565826018379064341 From Bullied to Brilliant : In the lead up to the US Elections, in the face of terrorism, hatred, fear, blatant environmental disregard...
In the lead up to the US Elections, in the face of terrorism, hatred, fear, blatant environmental disregard and bullish political posturing, we would do well to remember this powerful moment in history. "Let us dedicate ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: to tame the savageness of man and make gentle the life of this world." - Robert F. Kennedy #CultureOfPeace #Peace
http://ow.ly/gZYH300qOXs
Watch the video: The Greatest Speech Ever - Robert F Kennedy Announcing The Death Of Martin Luther King
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April 4th, 1968 Martin Luther King was shot and killed. On that night, Robert F Kennedy, New York's senator back then, wanted to deliver the news to the peop...
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https://plus.google.com/116474890825912761015 Matthew Stewart : "Each time a person stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others... he sends forth a...
"Each time a person stands up for an ideal,
or acts to improve the lot of others...
he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope,
and crossing each other from
a million different centers of energy and daring,
those ripples build a current
that can sweep down the mightiest walls
of oppression and resistance."

Robert F. Kennedy

What ripples are you sending out?
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https://plus.google.com/118006417161166104988 Historical Society of Rockland : #50Years Ago This Week in Rockland: Senator Robert F. Kennedy Arrives For Rockland Parley Photo by: ...
#50Years Ago This Week in Rockland: Senator Robert F. Kennedy Arrives For Rockland Parley
Photo by: Al Witt
Excerpt from The Journal News, Week of May 15-22, 1966

WORK TOGETHER TO COMBAT ROCKLAND PROBLEMS – RFK
Senator Robert F. Kennedy warned Rocklanders Saturday that without new levels of cooperative countywide effort they face “the nightmare of urban sprawl.”
Speaking to 65 persons, mostly Democratic Party and public officials, at the County Conference on Community Development, at the County Office Building the Senator said the pressures of suburban population growth can be met only by putting aside some local autonomy for mutual action at the county level.
In allotting the millions of dollars available in federal aid for health services, education, the war on poverty, sewer and water facilities and highway beautification, the federal government places increasing stress on area wide planning and action, Kennedy told the conference.
He cited the county’s $23million sewer project as “an example of progressive county leadership.”
Later, he said to reporters that federal aid would not be “cut out” for unilateral municipal projects, but “more and more decisions on aid will be based on proof of a cooperative effort at the local level.”
Specifically, he urged a county wide master plan, “so that towns and villages in the county are acting together to decide where to allow industry to be located, where to place water and sewer facilities where to build roads where to allow low and middle income housing to be built.
The necessary cooperation will involve short run sacrifices by individual communities, he said, but if we do not begin to act together now, the long-run sacrifices will be far greater.
“Traditionally we have looked upon the number and diversity of our local governments as a guarantee of local independence and grass roots democracy.
“But we can no longer afford the luxury of competing and contradictory local efforts. We must find a way to preserve local independence in cooperation--- to put aside insularity and engage in a cooperative effort on a scale never attempted before.”

he HSRC is pleased to be compiling “This Week in Rockland” a weekly feature appearing in the Rockland Review. Check out other events that happened this week in history! On Newsstands everywhere or online at www.rocklandreviewnews.com

www.RocklandHistory
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https://plus.google.com/105692107625847402029 Adam Sung : “Fear not the path of Truth for the lack of People walking on it.” ― Robert F. Kennedy
“Fear not the path of Truth for the lack of People walking on it.”
― Robert F. Kennedy
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https://plus.google.com/104126539796863090627 Craig von Buseck : Appropriate for today: Aeschylus, a playwright of ancient Greece, wrote famously of God, "…whose law...
Appropriate for today: Aeschylus, a playwright of ancient Greece, wrote famously of God, "…whose law it is that he who learns must suffer…"
The remainder of the quote was cited by Robert F. Kennedy in his speech announcing the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. on April, 4 1968.
Even in our sleep, pain which cannot forget
falls drop by drop upon the heart
until, in our own despair, against our will,
comes wisdom through the awful grace of God.
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https://plus.google.com/111602817346282908616 Breaking Cedar Rapids News : LOS ANGELES — Emmy-winning newsman Morley Safer, one of the first reporters to convey the brutality ...
LOS ANGELES — Emmy-winning newsman Morley Safer, one of the first reporters to convey the brutality of the Vietnam War to America’s TV viewers and a mainstay on “60 Minutes” for 46 years, has died, CBS News reports. He was 84. Safer announced his retirement just last week. A longtime correspondent as well as a writer for documentary series such as “CBS Reports,” Safer described his legacy to broadcast journalism as “a pretty solid body of work that emphasized the words, emphasized ideas and the craft of writing for this medium.” The 12-time winner of News and Documentary Emmys, including a lifetime achievement award in 2003, from 39 nominations also won three Peabody Awards. He left an indelible impression on broadcast journalism in 1965 with a key report from Vietnam broadcast on “CBS Evening News With Walter Cronkite.” The report depicted Safer accompanying U.S. Marines on a military action into a complex of villages called Cam Ne. His cameraman captured images of Marines using flamethrowers and cigarette lighters to set fire to thatched huts. The airing of the report, one of the first to document the unsettling details of Vietnam for U.S. TV audiences, marked a turning point in public opinion of the war, while the Pentagon and the White House accused Safer and CBS News of undermining the war effort. Safer was called a communist, and the Johnson administration attempted to discredit him and the network. Describing the impact of the broadcast, Safer said, “It was happening on television, uncensored, either in picture or commentary. There was a realization — perhaps least of all by the press, but certainly by the military and maybe by the public — that the rules have all changed.” In the aftermath of the report, the Pentagon, appalled by the footage captured by Safer’s crew, developed new procedures for conducting search-and-destroy missions. Safer first became a correspondent for CBS News in 1964, based in the London bureau. In 1965, he opened the CBS News bureau in Saigon, serving two tours in the war. In 1967, he became CBS News’ London bureau chief, covering Europe, Africa and the Middle East. He also returned to Vietnam to provide continuing coverage of the war. He joined “60 Minutes” as a correspondent in December 1970, following in the footsteps of Harry Reasoner. He remained with the program for the rest of his career, more than 40 years. Safer won his first News and Documentary Emmy in 1979 for “Teddy Kollek’s Jerusalem,” a profile of the mayor of Jerusalem. Original “60 Minutes” exec producer Don Hewitt has called Safer’s report “Lenell Geter’s in Jail” the finest hour in the history of the long-running series. The report, which aired in December 1983, documented new evidence in the conviction of an engineer for armed robbery and sentenced to life in a Texas prison. It garnered widespread attention when it aired. The evidence uncovered led to Geter’s release from prison. For the report, Safer won an Emmy for outstanding investigative journalism. In 1999 he won an Emmy for a report titled “The Forgotten Veterans,” which spotlighted the 10,000 female veterans of the Vietnam War. A Safer piece that aired on “60 Minutes” in 2001, “School for the Homeless,” about separate schools for homeless children, drew the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Awards’ First Prize for Domestic Television. Over the years with “60 Minutes,” Safer snagged profiles with elusive figures such Vogue’s Anna Wintour, whom he interviewed in 2009. The exclusive set the fashion industry abuzz. Later in his career, Safer also appeared on TV shows and in films about journalism. In 1993, he played himself on an episode of “Murphy Brown.” And in 2010, he was in the film “Morning Glory,” starring Harrison Ford, Rachel McAdams and Diane Keaton, again playing himself. In the 1990s, he provided narration to documentaries on PBS, including episodes of “The American Experience” and “American Masters.” In 2009, Safer donated his papers, including those related to his reporting on the burning of Cam Ne, to the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at the U. of Texas at Austin. Walter Cronkite’s papers are also part of the center’s collection. The center’s executive director called the donation “particularly fitting,” noting that “Cronkite deeply admired Safer as one of the very best correspondents in the history of CBS News.” In addition to his Emmy and Peabody awards, Safer received two George Polk Memorial Awards; three Overseas Press Club Awards; and two Alfred I. duPont Columbia U. Awards. The Radio/Television News Directors Assn. bestowed Safer with its Paul White Award, the org’s highest honor. He was nominated for WGA Awards in 2004, 2005 and 2006. Safer was born in Toronto and began his career as a newspaper reporter in Canada and England. He moved into broadcast journalism as a producer and correspondent for the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. His book “Flashbacks: On Returning to Vietnam,” published in 1990, documented his 1989 trip to Vietnam to film a report for “60 Minutes.” It became a best-seller. Safer is survived by his wife, the former Jane Fearer, and a daughter.
Morley Safer, legendary '60 Minutes' Reporter, dies at 84 | The Gazette
LOS ANGELES - Emmy-winning newsman Morley Safer, one of the first reporters to convey the brutality of the Vietnam War to America's TV viewers and a mainstay on '60 Minutes' for 46 years, has died, CBS News reports. He was 84.
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https://plus.google.com/113303849842723674132 Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights : Announcing the finalists for the 2016 RFK Urban Education Awards! On June 11, 2016, Schools That Can...
Announcing the finalists for the 2016 RFK Urban Education Awards!

On June 11, 2016, Schools That Can (STC) and Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights will celebrate the 50th anniversary of Kennedy’s Ripple of Hope” speech by honoring change-makers from across the country. This week, we are proud to announce the finalists in each awards category!
Schools That Can & Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights announce finalists for the RFK Urban Education Awards - Schools That Can
Schools That Can is the largest cross-sector network of urban schools in the country with 150+ district, charter, and independent schools. We unite leaders to expand quality urban education and close the opportunity and skills gap afflicting our schools, students, and society.
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https://plus.google.com/113303849842723674132 Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights : Today marks the anniversary of the historic #BrownVBoard decision, ruling that segregation in educational...
Today marks the anniversary of the historic #BrownVBoard decision, ruling that segregation in educational facilities was unconstitutional
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https://plus.google.com/113303849842723674132 Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights : Join us in supporting the International Day Against Homophobia & Transphobia! #IDAHOT
Join us in supporting the International Day Against Homophobia & Transphobia! #IDAHOT
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https://plus.google.com/116981677144024860946 Isiah Branden : Scientists Can Now Identify Individuals Based on Brain Waves, and More Troubling Possibilities http:...
Scientists Can Now Identify Individuals Based on Brain Waves, and More Troubling Possibilities http://rgn.bz/CQaM

by Joseph P. Farrell
No one likes talking about mind control, or mind reading, or thought manipulation technologies. After all, beyond the fact that they seem magical, almost unbelievable, no one likes to admit that human minds could be subject to manipulation and external influence; it violates a sense of our individuality and sovereignty that is deeply embedded in our culture. And the implications of such technology challenge our understandings of the relationship of the brain, the mind, and even jurisprudence.

s someone under “mind control” responsible or not for their actions? And if so, to what degree? There is for example a clear case that the alleged assassin of Senator Robert F. Kennedy, Sirhan Sirhan, exhibits patterns of behavior and suggestibility that suggest that he was a victim of such techniques and technologies.

Yet, the evidence for their existence cannot be denied. There are any number of patents concerning them over the decades which indicate an ongoing interest in them by scientists, and by our increasingly paranoid deep state. And now, they have taken yet another turn, according this important article shared by Ms. K.F.: “Scientists can now Identify individuals based on Brain Waves.”

Note the crux of the new technology: “But now, researchers from Binghamton University have found a more efficient way to identify people—using brain waves. Because people react to various stimuli—such as foods, or words, or celebrities—differently, it means people’s brain waves will also exhibit varying patterns when these things are presented to them. No two people will show the same brain pattern when presented an image of, say, a dog.

More http://rgn.bz/CQaM
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https://plus.google.com/115756477970014823383 Breaking El Paso News :

Matt Black Wins 2016 Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for 'The Geography of Poverty'
Photojournalist embarked on cross-country trip to explore, document and spark discussion about contemporary poverty and growing income inequality in the U.S. His work provides significant context for poverty-related issues on a global scale.
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