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Most recent 18 results returned for keyword: robert f kennedy (Search this on MAP)

https://plus.google.com/108292626386548337225 Tessa Schlesinger : Is Hillary Clinton knowingly using electoral fraud? QUOTE: As Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. mentioned, research...
Is Hillary Clinton knowingly using electoral fraud?
QUOTE: As Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. mentioned, research shows that exit polls are almost always spot on. When one or two are incorrect, they could be statistical anomalies, but the more incorrect they are, the more it substantiates electoral fraud.

QUOTE: This is shown by the data, which is extremely suspicious: discrepancies in eight of the sixteen primaries favoring Clinton in voting results over exit polling data are outside of the margin of error. That’s half of them outside the margin of error: 2.3% greater in Tennessee, 2.6% in Massachusetts, 4% in Texas, 4.7% in Mississippi, 5.2% in Ohio, 6.2% in New York, 7% in Georgia, and 7.9% in Alabama.

QUOTE: In every primary I could find data for, the Republican primaries have been almost exactly right, with every data point in the margin of error, during a more polarizing, contentious, and hard-to-predict race. Hence, this should be enough to prove my point: if exit polls were unreliable, then the Republican primaries would have equally bad exit polling data, but they don’t, not even by a long shot.

QUOTE: I could not find any instances of voter suppression disadvantaging Hillary Clinton. Yet, it unquestionably affected Bernie Sanders.

QUOTE: The perpetrators behind this electoral fraud are unknown. Until the voting ballots and results are fully investigated, the truth will remain clouded and our election results will never be verified.
Hillary Clinton and Electoral Fraud
Why we need an investigation into electoral fraud favoring Hillary Clinton
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https://plus.google.com/116051232070267642493 Ferry Garg : Howard Zinn. An Introduction To A Fearless Socalist. Howard Zinn (August 24, 1922 – January 27, 2010...
Howard Zinn. An Introduction To A Fearless Socalist.

Howard Zinn (August 24, 1922 – January 27, 2010) was an American historian, playwright, and social activist. He was a political science professor at Boston University. Zinn wrote more than twenty books, including his best-selling and influential A People's History of the United States. In 2007, he published a version of it for younger readers, A Young People′s History of the United States.

Zinn described himself as "something of an anarchist, something of a socialist. Maybe a democratic socialist." He wrote extensively about the civil rights and anti-war movements, and labour history of the United States. His memoir, You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train, was also the title of a 2004 documentary about Zinn's life and work. Zinn died of a heart attack in 2010, aged 87.

Early life:
Zinn was born to a Jewish immigrant family in Brooklyn on August 24, 1922. His father, Eddie Zinn, born in Austria-Hungary, emigrated to the U.S. with his brother Samuel before the outbreak of World War I. Howard's mother, Jenny (Rabinowitz) Zinn, emigrated from the Eastern Siberian city of Irkutsk. His parents first became acquainted as workers at the same factory. His father worked as a ditch digger and window cleaner during the Depression. His father and mother ran a neighbourhood candy store for a brief time, barely getting by. For many years his father was in the waiters' union and worked as a waiter for weddings and bar mitzvahs.

Both parents were factory workers with limited education when they met and married, and there were no books or magazines in the series of apartments where they raised their children. Zinn's parents introduced him to literature by sending ten cents plus a coupon to the New York Post for each of the 20 volumes of Charles Dickens' collected works. As a young man, Zinn made the acquaintance of several young Communists from his Brooklyn neighbourhood. They invited him to a political rally being held in Times Square. Despite it being a peaceful rally, mounted police charged the marchers. Zinn was hit and knocked unconscious. This would have a profound affect on his political and social outlook.

He also studied creative writing at Thomas Jefferson High School in a special program established by principal and poet Elias Lieberman.
After graduating high school in 1940, Zinn took up a trade as an apprentice ship-fitter in the New York Navy Yard at the age of 18. Concerns about low wages and hazardous working conditions compelled Zinn and several other apprentices formed the Apprentice Association. At the time, apprentices were excluded from trade unions and thus had little in the way of bargaining power, the Apprentice Association was their answer. The head organizers of the association, which included Zinn himself, would meet once a week outside of work to discuss strategy and read books that at the time were considered radical. Zinn was the Activities Director for the group. His time in this group would tremendously influence his political views and created for him an appreciation for unions.

World War II:
Eager to fight fascism, Zinn joined the U.S. Army Air Force during World War II and was assigned as a bombardier in the 490th Bombardment Group, bombing targets in Berlin, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary. As bombardier, Zinn dropped napalm bombs in April 1945 on Royan, a seaside resort in southwestern France. The anti-war stance Zinn developed later was informed, in part, by his experiences.

On a post-doctoral research mission nine years later, Zinn visited the resort near Bordeaux where he interviewed residents, reviewed municipal documents, and read wartime newspaper clippings at the local library. In 1966, Zinn returned to Royan after which he gave his fullest account of that research in his book, The Politics of History. On the ground, Zinn learned that the aerial bombing attacks in which he participated had killed more than a thousand French civilians as well as some German soldiers hiding near Royan to await the war's end, events that are described "in all accounts" he found as "une tragique erreur" that levelled a small but ancient city and "its population that was, at least officially, friend, not foe." In The Politics of History, Zinn described how the bombing was ordered—three weeks before the war in Europe ended—by military officials who were, in part, motivated more by the desire for their own career advancement than in legitimate military objectives. He quotes the official history of the U.S. Army Air Forces' brief reference to the Eighth Air Force attack on Royan and also, in the same chapter, to the bombing of Pilsen in what was then Czechoslovakia. The official history stated that the famous Skoda works in Pilsen "received 500 well-placed tons," and that "because of a warning sent out ahead of time the workers were able to escape, except for five persons."

Zinn wrote:
I recalled flying on that mission, too, as deputy lead bombardier, and that we did not aim specifically at the 'Skoda works' (which I would have noted, because it was the one target in Czechoslovakia I had read about) but dropped our bombs, without much precision, on the city of Pilsen. Two Czech citizens who lived in Pilsen at the time told me, recently, that several hundred people were killed in that raid (that is, Czechs)—not five.

Zinn said his experience as a wartime bombardier, combined with his research into the reasons for, and effects of the bombing of Royan and Pilsen, sensitized him to the ethical dilemmas faced by G.I.s during wartime. Zinn questioned the justifications for military operations that inflicted massive civilian casualties during the Allied bombing of cities such as Dresden, Royan, Tokyo, and Hiroshima and Nagasaki in World War II, Hanoi during the War in Vietnam, and Baghdad during the war in Iraq and the civilian casualties during bombings in Afghanistan during the current war there. In his pamphlet, Hiroshima: Breaking the Silence written in 1995, he laid out the case against targeting civilians with aerial bombing.
Six years later, he wrote:

Recall that in the midst of the Gulf War, the U.S. military bombed an air raid shelter, killing 400 to 500 men, women, and children who were huddled to escape bombs. The claim was that it was a military target, housing a communications centre, but reporters going through the ruins immediately afterwards said there was no sign of anything like that. I suggest that the history of bombing—and no one has bombed more than this nation—is a history of endless atrocities, all calmly explained by deceptive and deadly language like 'accident', 'military target', and 'collateral damage'.


Education:
After World War II, Zinn attended New York University on the GI Bill, graduating with a B.A. in 1951. At Columbia University, he earned an M.A. (1952) and a Ph.D. in history with a minor in political science (1958). His masters' thesis examined the Colorado coal strikes of 1914. His doctoral dissertation LaGuardia in Congress was a study of Fiorello LaGuardia's congressional career, and it depicted "the conscience of the twenties" as LaGuardia fought for public power, the right to strike, and the redistribution of wealth by taxation. "His specific legislative program," Zinn wrote, "was an astonishingly accurate preview of the New Deal." It was published by the Cornell University Press for the American Historical Association. LaGuardia in Congress was nominated for the American Historical Association's Beveridge Prize as the best English-language book on American history.

His professors at Columbia included Harry Carman, Henry Steele Commager, and David Donald. But it was Columbia historian Richard Hofstadter's The American Political Tradition that made the most lasting impression. Zinn regularly included it in his lists of recommended readings, and, after Barack Obama was elected President of the United States, Zinn wrote, "If Richard Hofstadter were adding to his book The American Political Tradition, in which he found both 'conservative' and 'liberal' presidents, both Democrats and Republicans, maintaining for dear life the two critical characteristics of the American system, nationalism and capitalism, Obama would fit the pattern."

In 1960–61, Zinn was a post-doctoral fellow in East Asian Studies at Harvard University.

Academic career:
"We were not born critical of existing society. There was a moment in our lives (or a month, or a year) when certain facts appeared before us, startled us, and then caused us to question beliefs that were strongly fixed in our consciousness – embedded there by years of family prejudices, orthodox schooling, imbibing of newspapers, radio, and television. This would seem to lead to a simple conclusion: that we all have an enormous responsibility to bring to the attention of others information they do not have, which has the potential of causing them to rethink long-held ideas."


Zinn was professor of history at Spelman College in Atlanta from 1956 to 1963, and visiting professor at both the University of Paris and University of Bologna. At the end of the academic year in 1963, Zinn was fired from Spelman. In 1964, he accepted a position at Boston University, after writing two books and participating in the Civil Rights Movement in the South. His classes in civil liberties were among the most popular at the university with as many as 400 students subscribing each semester to the non-required class. A professor of political science, he taught at BU for 24 years and retired in 1988 at age 64.

"He had a deep sense of fairness and justice for the underdog. But he always kept his sense of humour. He was a happy warrior," said Caryl Rivers, journalism professor at Boston University. Rivers and Zinn were among a group of faculty members who in 1979 defended the right of the school's clerical workers to strike and were threatened with dismissal after refusing to cross a picket line.

Zinn came to believe that the point of view expressed in traditional history books was often limited. Biographer Martin Duberman noted that when he was asked directly if he was a Marxist, Zinn replied, "Yes, I'm something of a Marxist." He especially was influenced by the liberating vision of the young Marx in overcoming alienation, and disliked Marx's later dogmatism. In later life he moved more toward anarchism.

He wrote a history textbook, A People's History of the United States, to provide other perspectives on American history. The textbook depicts the struggles of Native Americans against European and U.S. conquest and expansion, slaves against slavery, unionists and other workers against capitalists, women against patriarchy, and African-Americans for civil rights. The book was a finalist for the National Book Award in 1981.

In the years since the first edition of A People's History was published in 1980, it has been used as an alternative to standard textbooks in many high school and college history courses, and it is one of the most widely known examples of critical pedagogy. The New York Times Book Review stated in 2006 that the book "routinely sells more than 100,000 copies a year".

In 2004, Zinn published Voices of a People's History of the United States with Anthony Arnove. Voices is a source-book of speeches, articles, essays, poetry and song lyrics by the people themselves whose stories are told in A People's History.

In 2008, the Zinn Education Project was launched to support educators using A People's History of the United States as a source for middle and high school history. The Project was started when a former student of Zinn, who wanted to bring Zinn's lessons to students around the country, provided the financial backing to allow two other organizations, Rethinking Schools and Teaching for Change to coordinate the Project. The Project hosts a website that has over 100 free downloadable lesson plans to complement A People's History of the United States.

The People Speak, released in 2010, is a documentary movie based on A People's History of the United States and inspired by the lives of ordinary people who fought back against oppressive conditions over the course of the history of the United States. The film, narrated by Zinn, includes performances by Matt Damon, Morgan Freeman, Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Eddie Vedder, Viggo Mortensen, Josh Brolin, Danny Glover, Marisa Tomei, Don Cheadle, and Sandra Oh.


Civil Rights Movement:
From 1956 through 1963, Zinn chaired the Department of History and social sciences at Spelman College. He participated in the Civil Rights Movement and lobbied with historian August Meier[30] "to end the practice of the Southern Historical Association of holding meetings at segregated hotels".

While at Spelman, Zinn served as an adviser to the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and wrote about sit-ins and other actions by SNCC for The Nation and Harper's. In 1964, Beacon Press published his book SNCC: The New Abolitionists.

Zinn collaborated with historian Staughton Lynd mentoring student activists, among them Alice Walker, who would later write The Colour Purple; and Marian Wright Edelman, founder and president of the Children’s Defense Fund. Edelman identified Zinn as a major influence in her life and, in that same journal article, tells of his accompanying students to a sit-in at the segregated white section of the Georgia state legislature. Zinn also co-wrote a column in The Boston Globe with fellow activist Eric Mann, "Left Field Stands".

Although Zinn was a tenured professor, he was dismissed in June 1963 after siding with students in the struggle against segregation. As Zinn described in The Nation, though Spelman administrators prided themselves for turning out refined "young ladies," its students were likely to be found on the picket line, or in jail for participating in the greater effort to break down segregation in public places in Atlanta. Zinn's years at Spelman are recounted in his autobiography You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train: A Personal History of Our Times. His seven years at Spelman College, Zinn said, "are probably the most interesting, exciting, most educational years for me. I learned more from my students than my students learned from me."

While living in Georgia, Zinn wrote that he observed 30 violations of the First and Fourteenth amendments to the United States Constitution in Albany, Georgia, including the rights to freedom of speech, freedom of assembly and equal protection under the law. In an article on the civil rights movement in Albany, Zinn described the people who participated in the Freedom Rides to end segregation, and the reluctance of President John F. Kennedy to enforce the law.
Zinn has also pointed out that the Justice Department under Robert F. Kennedy and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, headed by J. Edgar Hoover, did little or nothing to stop the segregationists from brutalizing civil rights workers.

Zinn wrote about the struggle for civil rights, as both participant and historian. His second book, The Southern Mystique was published in 1964, the same year as his SNCC: The New Abolitionists in which he describes how the sit-ins against segregation were initiated by students and, in that sense, were independent of the efforts of the older, more established civil rights organizations.

In 2005, forty-one years after his firing, Zinn returned to Spelman where he was given an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters. He delivered the commencement address titled, "Against Discouragement" and said that "the lesson of that history is that you must not despair, that if you are right, and you persist, things will change. The government may try to deceive the people, and the newspapers and television may do the same, but the truth has a way of coming out. The truth has a power greater than a hundred lies."

Anti-war efforts:
Zinn wrote one of the earliest books calling for the U.S. withdrawal from its war in Vietnam. Vietnam: The Logic of Withdrawal was published by Beacon Press in 1967 based on his articles in Commonweal, The Nation, and Ramparts.

In Noam Chomsky's view, The Logic of Withdrawal was Zinn's most important book. "He was the first person to say—loudly, publicly, very persuasively—that this simply has to stop; we should get out, period, no conditions; we have no right to be there; it's an act of aggression; pull out. It was so surprising at the time that there wasn't even a review of the book. In fact, he asked me if I would review it in Ramparts just so that people would know about the book."

In December 1969, radical historians tried unsuccessfully to persuade the American Historical Association to pass an anti-Vietnam War resolution. "A debacle unfolded as Harvard historian (and AHA president in 1968) John Fairbank literally wrestled the microphone from Zinn's hands." Correspondence by Fairbank, Zinn and other historians, published by the AHA in 1970, is online in what Fairbank called "our briefly-famous Struggle for the Mike."
In later years, Zinn was an adviser to the Disarm Education Fund.

Vietnam:
Zinn's diplomatic visit to Hanoi with Rev. Daniel Berrigan, during the Tet Offensive in January 1968, resulted in the return of three American airmen, the first American POWs released by the North Vietnamese since the U.S. bombing of that nation had begun. The event was widely reported in the news media and discussed in a variety of books including Who Spoke Up? American Protest Against the War in Vietnam 1963–1975 by Nancy Zaroulis and Gerald Sullivan Zinn and the Berrigan brothers, Dan and Philip, remained friends and allies over the years.

Also in January 1968, he signed the "Writers and Editors War Tax Protest" pledge, vowing to refuse tax payments in protest against the war.

Daniel Ellsberg, a former RAND consultant who had secretly copied The Pentagon Papers, which described the history of the United States' military involvement in Southeast Asia, gave a copy to Howard and Roslyn Zinn. Along with Noam Chomsky, Zinn edited and annotated the copy of The Pentagon Papers that Senator Mike Gravel read into the Congressional Record and that was subsequently published by Beacon Press.

Announced on August 17 and published on October 10, 1971, this four-volume, relatively expensive set became the "Senator Gravel Edition", which studies from Cornell University and the Annenberg Centre for Communication have labelled as the most complete edition of the Pentagon Papers to be published. The "Gravel Edition" was edited and annotated by Noam Chomsky and Howard Zinn, and included an additional volume of analytical articles on the origins and progress of the war, also edited by Chomsky and Zinn. Beacon Press became the object of an FBI investigation; an outgrowth of which was Gravel v. United States in which the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in June 1972; that the Speech or Debate Clause in the US Constitution did grant immunity to Gravel for his reading the papers in his subcommittee, and did grant some immunity to Gravel's congressional aide, but granted no immunity to Beacon Press in relation to its publishing the same papers.

Zinn testified as an expert witness at Ellsberg's criminal trial for theft, conspiracy, and espionage in connection with the publication of the Pentagon Papers by The New York Times. Defence attorneys asked Zinn to explain to the jury the history of U.S. involvement in Vietnam from World War II through 1963. Zinn discussed that history for several hours, and later reflected on his time before the jury.
I explained there was nothing in the papers of military significance that could be used to harm the defence of the United States, that the information in them was simply embarrassing to our government because what was revealed, in the government's own interoffice memos, was how it had lied to the American public. The secrets disclosed in the Pentagon Papers might embarrass politicians, might hurt the profits of corporations wanting tin, rubber, oil, in far-off places. But this was not the same as hurting the nation, the people.
Most of the jurors later said that they voted for acquittal. However, the federal judge who presided over the case dismissed it on grounds it had been tainted by the Nixon administration's burglary of the office of Ellsberg's psychiatrist.

Zinn's testimony on the motivation for government secrecy was confirmed in 1989 by Erwin Griswold, who as U.S. solicitor general during the Nixon administration, sued The New York Times in the Pentagon Papers case in 1971 to stop publication. Griswold persuaded three Supreme Court justices to vote to stop The New York Times from continuing to publish the Pentagon Papers, an order known as "prior restraint" that has been held to be illegal under the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The papers were simultaneously published in The Washington Post, effectively nullifying the effect of the prior restraint order. In 1989, Griswold admitted there had been no national security damage resulting from publication. In a column in the Washington Post, Griswold wrote: "It quickly becomes apparent to any person who has considerable experience with classified material that there is massive over-classification and that the principal concern of the classifiers is not with national security, but with governmental embarrassment of one sort or another."

Zinn supported the G.I. antiwar movement during the U.S. war in Vietnam. In the 2001 film Unfinished Symphony: Democracy and Dissent, Zinn provides a historical context for the 1971 antiwar march by Vietnam Veterans against the War. The marchers travelled from Lexington, Massachusetts, to Bunker Hill, "which retraced Paul Revere's ride of 1775 and ended in the massive arrest of 410 veterans and civilians by the Lexington police." The film depicts "scenes from the 1971 Winter Soldier hearings, during which former G.I.s testified about "atrocities" they either participated in or said they had witnessed committed by U.S. forces in Vietnam.

Iraq:
Howard Zinn speaking at Marlboro College February 2004
Zinn opposed the 2003 invasion and occupation of Iraq and wrote several books about it. In an interview with The Brooklyn Rail he said,
We certainly should not be initiating a war, as it's not a clear and present danger to the United States, or in fact, to anyone around it. If it were, then the states around Iraq would be calling for a war on it. The Arab states around Iraq are opposed to the war, and if anyone's in danger from Iraq, they are. At the same time, the U.S. is violating the U.N. charter by initiating a war on Iraq. Bush made a big deal about the number of resolutions Iraq has violated—and it's true, Iraq has not abided by the resolutions of the Security Council. But it's not the first nation to violate Security Council resolutions. Israel has violated Security Council resolutions every year since 1967. Now, however, the U.S. is violating a fundamental principle of the U.N. Charter, which is that nations can't initiate a war—they can only do so after being attacked. And Iraq has not attacked us.

He asserted that the U.S. would end Gulf War II when resistance within the military increased in the same way resistance within the military contributed to ending the U.S. war in Vietnam. Zinn compared the demand by a growing number of contemporary U.S. military families to end the war in Iraq to parallel demands "in the Confederacy in the Civil War, when the wives of soldiers rioted because their husbands were dying and the plantation owners were profiting from the sale of cotton, refusing to grow grains for civilians to eat."

Jean-Christophe Agnew, Professor of History and American Studies at Yale University, told the Yale Daily News in May 2007 that Zinn’s historical work is "highly influential and widely used". He observed that it is not unusual for prominent professors such as Zinn to weigh in on current events, citing a resolution opposing the war in Iraq that was recently ratified by the American Historical Association. Agnew added: "In these moments of crisis, when the country is split—so historians are split".


Socialism:
Zinn described himself as "something of an anarchist, something of a socialist. Maybe a democratic socialist." He suggested looking at socialism in its full historical context as a popular, positive idea that got a bad name from its association with Soviet Communism. In Madison, Wisconsin, in 2009, Zinn said:

Let's talk about socialism. I think it's very important to bring back the idea of socialism into the national discussion to where it was at the turn of the [last] century before the Soviet Union gave it a bad name. Socialism had a good name in this country. Socialism had Eugene Debs. It had Clarence Darrow. It had Mother Jones. It had Emma Goldman. It had several million people reading socialist newspapers around the country. Socialism basically said, hey, let's have a kinder, gentler society. Let's share things. Let's have an economic system that produces things not because they're profitable for some corporation, but produces things that people need. People should not be retreating from the word socialism because you have to go beyond capitalism.

FBI files:
Because of a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request, on July 30, 2010, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) released a file with 423 pages of information on Howard Zinn’s life and activities. During the height of McCarthyism in 1949, the FBI first opened a domestic security investigation on Zinn (FBI File # 100-360217), based on Zinn’s activities in what the agency considered to be communist front groups, such as the American Labour Party, and informant reports that Zinn was an active member of the Communist Party of the United States (CPUSA). Zinn denied ever being a member and said that he had participated in the activities of various organizations which might be considered Communist fronts but that his participation was motivated by his belief that in this country people had the right to believe, think, and act according to their own ideals.

According to journalist Chris Hedges, Zinn "steadfastly refused to cooperate in the anti-communist witch-hunts in the 1950s."
Later in the 1960s, as a result of Zinn's campaigning against the Vietnam War and his influence on Martin Luther King, Jr., the FBI designated Zinn a high security risk to the country, a category that allowed them to summarily arrest him if a state of emergency were to be declared. The FBI memos also show that they were concerned with Zinn’s repeated criticism of the FBI for failing to protect blacks against white mob violence. Zinn's daughter said she was not surprised by the files; "He always knew they had a file on him".

Personal life:
Zinn married Roslyn Shechter in 1944. They remained married until her death in 2008. They had a daughter, Myla, and a son, Jeff. Jeff directed several productions of plays by his father and read the audio-book of A People’s History of the United States.

Death.
Zinn was swimming in a hotel pool when he died of an apparent heart attack in Santa Monica, California, on January 27, 2010, aged 87. He had been scheduled to speak at Crossroads School (Santa Monica, California) and Santa Monica Museum of Art for an event titled "A Collection of Ideas... the People Speak."

In one of his last interviews, Zinn stated that he would like to be remembered "for introducing a different way of thinking about the world, about war, about human rights, about equality," and
for getting more people to realize that the power which rests so far in the hands of people with wealth and guns, that the power ultimately rests in people themselves and that they can use it. At certain points in history, they have used it. Black people in the South used it. People in the women's movement used it. People in the anti-war movement used it. People in other countries who have overthrown tyrannies have used it.

He said he wanted to be known as "somebody who gave people a feeling of hope and power that they didn't have before."

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https://plus.google.com/101568266241730155322 Levine Museum of the New South : "Each time a man stands up for an ideal or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against...
"Each time a man stands up for an ideal or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sounds out a tiny ripple of hope." ~Robert F. Kennedy.
Have you sent out a ripple today? #CometoUnderstand
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https://plus.google.com/112449335480876531082 Robert Miller :

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.: Doing the math on meningitis vaccinations
This past Thursday, the University of Colorado-Boulder student government passed a resolution asking the CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) to recommend meningococcal vaccines for all incoming college students.
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https://plus.google.com/113768640513130436414 shahriyar Gourgi : Newly released footage shows an atmospheric test of the smallest and lightest nuclear weapon ever deployed...
Newly released footage shows an atmospheric test of the smallest and lightest nuclear weapon ever deployed by the U.S. The test, code-named Little Feller I, took place on July 17th, 1962, with Attorney General and presidential adviser Robert. F. Kennedy in attendance.
Watch the Smallest Nuclear Explosion With Bobby Kennedy
​The Davy Crockett nuclear weapon was carried by a jeep and operated by a three-man crew​.​
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https://plus.google.com/106791008050958826531 Emmett Pickett : #ARareHero #RFKLivingTheLegacy - "Some look for scapegoats, others look for conspiracies, but this much...
#ARareHero #RFKLivingTheLegacy - "Some look for scapegoats, others look for conspiracies, but this much is clear; violence breeds violence, repression brings retaliation, and only a cleaning of our whole society can remove this sickness from our soul.

For there is another kind of violence, slower but just as deadly, destructive as the shot or the bomb in the night. This is the violence of institutions; indifference and inaction and slow decay. This is the violence that afflicts the poor, that poisons relations between men because their skin has different colors. This is a slow destruction of a child by hunger, and schools without books and homes without heat in the winter.

This is the breaking of a man's spirit by denying him the chance to stand as a father and as a man among other men. And this too afflicts us all. I have not come here to propose a set of specific remedies nor is there a single set. For a broad and adequate outline we know what must be done. When you teach a man to hate and fear his brother, when you teach that he is a lesser man because of his color or his beliefs or the policies he pursues, when you teach that those who differ from you threaten your freedom or your job or your family, then you also learn to confront others not as fellow citizens but as enemies - to be met not with cooperation but with conquest, to be subjugated and mastered.

We learn, at the last, to look at our brothers as aliens, men with whom we share a city, but not a community, men bound to us in common dwelling, but not in common effort. We learn to share only a common fear - only a common desire to retreat from each other - only a common impulse to meet disagreement with force. For all this there are no final answers.

Yet we know what we must do. It is to achieve true justice among our fellow citizens. The question is now what programs we should seek to enact. The question is whether we can find in our own midst and in our own hearts that leadership of human purpose that will recognize the terrible truths of our existence.

We must admit the vanity of our false distinctions among men and learn to find our own advancement in the search for the advancement of all. We must admit in ourselves that our own children's future cannot be built on the misfortunes of others. We must recognize that this short life can neither be ennobled or enriched by hatred or revenge.

Our lives on this planet are too short and the work to be done too great to let this spirit flourish any longer in our land. Of course we cannot vanish it with a program, nor with a resolution.

But we can perhaps remember - even if only for a time - that those who live with us are our brothers, that they share with us the same short movement of life, that they seek - as we do - nothing but the chance to live out their lives in purpose and happiness, winning what satisfaction and fulfillment they can.

Surely this bond of common faith, this bond of common goal, can begin to teach us something. Surely we can learn, at least, to look at those around us as fellow men and surely we can begin to work a little harder to bind up the wounds among us and to become in our hearts brothers and countrymen once again." - http://www.jfk-online.com/rfk.html
Robert F. Kennedy: Remembering Bobby: The Revolutionary Senator
RFK: A tribute to the late Senator Robert F. Kennedy, focusing on his work on behalf of the disenfranchised.
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https://plus.google.com/117157961533612321672 DandyDon “Xerox6085” : CENK RECOMMENDS: Check Out The Ring Of Fire Cenk Uygur (host of The Young Turks) tells you why you ...
CENK RECOMMENDS: Check Out The Ring Of Fire

Cenk Uygur (host of The Young Turks) tells you why you should check out one of TYT's partners http://ringoffireradio.com/

The Ring of Fire started as a weekly syndicated radio show in 2004 for the purpose of exposing Wall Street thugs, environmental criminality, corporate media failure, and political back stories that you will rarely find from any other source. Since its formation, The Ring of Fire has expanded into a multi-media network for the latest Progressive news, commentary and analysis. Mike Papantonio, Robert F. Kennedy Jr., Thom Hartmann, Ed Schultz, Abby Martin, Laura Flanders, Sam Seder, Farron Cousins and David Pakman host weekly radio and television broadcasts, and posts daily news stories and original video commentaries at http://www.trofire.com that are viewed millions of times each week.
Watch the video: CENK RECOMMENDS: Check Out The Ring Of Fire
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Cenk Uygur (host of The Young Turks) tells you why you should check out one of TYT's partners http://ringoffireradio.com/ The Ring of Fire started as a weekl...
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https://plus.google.com/100928785512970340925 Vlad Dracula : LOS ANGELES CHIEF MEDICAL EXAMINER  FREEZER 001 JANE DOE 001 5 AIGUST 1962 PUT MY SEAL ON THE FREEZER...
LOS ANGELES CHIEF MEDICAL EXAMINER  FREEZER 001 JANE DOE 001 5 AIGUST 1962 PUT MY SEAL ON THE FREEZER AND LEAVE HER THERE 365 DAYS UNTIL I U.S. ARMY MEDICAL EXAMINER OROSECUTE ATTORNEY GENERAL ROBERT F. KENNEDY FOR ILLEGAL USE OF PRESCRIPTION DRUGS AND CONSPIRACY TO MURDER MY DAUGHTER MARILYN MONROE WITH MR. FRANK SINATRA IF I HAVE PROSECUTE HIM WITH EVERY IRALIAN UNTIL I GET THE VATICAN AND IF HIS HOLINESS IS INVOLVED IN THE DEATH OF MY DAUGHTER MARILYN MONROE I WILL PERSONALLY PUT THE HANDCUFFS ON WTISTS AS WE ESCORT HIM TO UNITED STATES AIR FORCE ONE FOR INDICTMENT!
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https://plus.google.com/100928785512970340925 Vlad Dracula : Aspiring Satanist Want To Be There Is Only One Way I Know That I Set The Satanic By Orders Of The Pentagon...
Aspiring Satanist Want To Be There Is Only One Way I Know That I Set The Satanic By Orders Of The Pentagon Under Direct Command And Executive Orders Of President Lyndon B. Johnson as C.I.A.001 Number One Assassin As Soon As We Landed United States Air Force One At President Ho Chih MIHN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT! Is It Your Sworn Affidavit Attorney General Robert FUCKING Kennedy that the U.S.A. Has never annihilated the universe???? Has NEVER RAPED FIVE YEAR OLD BOYS IN THE ANAL SECTION OR BY CRUELTY AND FORCE OF U.S. SECRET SERVICE MADE THEM WASH YOUR LITTLE WEENIE WHILE THE VICE-PRESIDENT WAS GETTING JOLLEYS FUCKING A GOAT IN THE ASS???? THAT YOU NEVER SENT THE U.S. MARSHAL SERVICE TO HARASS OR MURDER THE BOYFRIEND OR PERSONAL BODYGUARD OF MINDY MCCREADY??? DID THE CORONER OF CLEBURNE COUNTY THE OLMSTEAD ORGANIZED CRIME SYNDICATE HANDLE THE AUTOPSY OF MISS MCCREADY OR DID U.S. SECRET SERVICE COMPOUND THEIR CRIMINAL ACT OF CONSPIRING WITH THE VICE-PRESIDENT AND THE OLMSTEAD FAMILY TO ASSASSINATE THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON GREERS FERRY DAM 3 OCTOBER 1963???? GO AHEAD AND ANSWER ATTORNEY GENERAL ROBERT F. KENNEDY AND ALSO WHETHER THE F.B.I. DIRECTOR J. EDGAR HOOVER PAINTED HIS TOENAILS PINK WHILE WEARING THE DRESS AND SHOES OF MARILYN MONROE? AND DID THEY THE F.B.I. COMMITT THE CRIME OF ILLEGALLY WIRETAPPING HER TELEPHONE???? IF THOSE RECORDINGS WERE STILL IN EXISTENCE EVEN THOUGH SHE I DEAD 5 AUGUST 1962 AND PRESIDENT JOHN F. KENNEDY TOO???? I WOULD LOVE TO HEAR THOSE CONVERSATIONS THAT THROUGH THE THREAT OF THE TERRORIST AGENCY CALLED THE FEDERAL BANG! BUREAU! BANG!!! OF TERRORISM! BANG SIC SEMPER TYRANUS! I WOULD HAVE TO BE MY DAUGHTER'S BODYGUARD NO ONE WOULD HAVE SURVIVED IN CALIFORNIA 5 AUGUST 1962 EXCEPT MY DAUGHTER MARILYN MONROE!!! CALIFORNIA WOULD BE UNDER THE PACIFIC OCEAN AS CONFEDERATE STATES MARINE I WOULD HAVE DEFENDED MY DAUGHTER AS I DO MY ENTIRE SATANIC FAMILY AS EARTH HAIL SATAN!!! GO AHEAD AND RESPOND PLEASE!!!
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https://plus.google.com/106770229438719038596 Travel and Tour World : Robert F. Kennedy Bridge Queens Span Pedestrian Walkway To Close Nightly During May For Maintenance ...
Robert F. Kennedy Bridge Queens Span Pedestrian Walkway To Close Nightly During May For Maintenance
Beginning Sunday, May 1, 2016, at 9:00 p.m., and nightly through the month of May until 5:00 a.m. each morning, the pedestrian walkway of the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge’s Queens span will be closed. Continue Reading...
Travel and Tour World: Robert F. Kennedy Bridge Queens Span Pedestrian Walkway To Close Nightly During May For Maintenance
Travel and Tour World, a travel trade media and an information platform, is an all-inclusive and far-reaching B2B travel magazine. It aspires to build a network of travel and tour professionals across the globe to mark its presence in this increasingly competitive market. [TRAVELANDTOURWORLD.
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https://plus.google.com/111133117200021796916 Clay Claiborne : For more than ten thousand years, humanity has looked up at the night sky and drew patterns among the...
For more than ten thousand years, humanity has looked up at the night sky and drew patterns among the stars. We created relationships between the stars based on our very unique point of view that have no basis in reality. Take for example the Andromeda Constellation. It is visible in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres. One of its stars, Mirach, is red giant around 200 light years from Earth, another of its "stars," M31 isn't a star at all, it's a galaxy made up of over a trillion stars more than 1.2 million light years from Earth. Even so, since at least the 2nd century, humans have grouped then together in one of the original 48 constellations listed by Greco-Roman astronomer Ptolemy. Obviously these two points of light in the night sky share nothing in common outside the brains of humans and yet we group them together and assume a connection because that's what it looks like to us.

Here's another fun fact about constellations: The sun is the only known star in our galaxy which is not part of a constellation. Now, why is that?

In the piece that we are about to examine, in some detail I should warn, Robert F. Kennedy Jr. strains to understand what has been happening in Syria, but he is like the primitive Earthbound observer straining to understand the points of light that make up Andromeda. Whereas the early astronomers mistook the super galaxy M31 for an ordinary star, Kennedy sees in the million points of light that make up the Syrian Revolution, just another oil war.
Robert F. Kennedy's Jr. Andromeda Strain
Tweet For more than ten thousand years, humanity has looked up at the night sky and drew patterns among the stars. We created relationships between the stars based on our very unique point of view that hav...
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https://plus.google.com/114861355280490234598 Automobile Engineering Services Co.,Ltd. (Kyaw Thura Maung) : Shared route From Exxon to H & H ATM via St Nicholas Ave. 1 hr 59 min (20 mi) 1. Head southeast on...
Shared route
From Exxon to H & H ATM via St Nicholas Ave.

1 hr 59 min (20 mi)


1. Head southeast on Hazlitt Ave toward Maple St
2. Turn left onto Maple St
3. Turn right onto Main St
4. Turn left onto Martha Washington Way/Park Ave
5. Turn right onto Bruce Reynolds Blvd
6. Turn left toward New York State Bicycle Rte 9
7. Turn right onto New York State Bicycle Rte 9
8. Turn right onto Cabrini Blvd
9. Turn right onto W 177th St
10. Turn left onto Haven Ave
11. Continue onto W 168th St
12. Turn right onto St Nicholas Ave
13. Turn right onto Amsterdam Ave
14. Turn left onto W 160th St
15. Turn right onto St Nicholas Ave
16. Turn left onto W 120th St
17. Continue onto E 120th Street Pedestrian Bridge
18. Sharp right onto Bobby Wagner Walk
19. Take the pedestrian overpass ramp
20. Turn right onto Central Rd
21. Continue straight onto Hell Gate Cir
22. Turn right onto Robert F. Kennedy Bridge Trail
23. Turn left onto Hoyt Ave S
24. Continue onto Astoria Blvd S/Truck I-278
25. Turn right onto 36th St
26. Turn left onto 28th Ave
27. Turn right onto Hobart St
28. Slight left onto 51st St
29. Turn left onto 32nd Ave
30. Turn right onto 61st St
31. Turn left onto 34th Ave
32. Turn right onto 108th St
33. Turn left onto Roosevelt Ave
34. Turn right onto 111th St
35. Turn left onto Carousel Loop
36. Turn left to stay on Carousel Loop
37. Turn left onto United Nations Ave S
38. Turn right onto Avenue of Africa
39. Turn left onto Meridian Rd
40. Turn right onto Brooklyn-Queens Greenway
41. Turn left onto Boathouse Bridge/Meadow Lake Promenade
42. Continue onto Meadow Lake Dr
43. Slight left onto Brooklyn-Queens Greenway
44. Turn right onto Brooklyn-Queens Greenway/Park Dr E
45. Turn left onto 72nd Ave
46. Turn right onto Main St
47. Arrive at location: H & H ATM

To see this route visit http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=Exxon&daddr=H%20%26%20H%20ATM&geocode=FepnbwId0xuX-ym9pD0hIPfCiTGDhvdO9SHPzQ%3D%3D%3BFTFwbQIdQ5OZ-yl_zMujiWDCiTHWv8jt7LPARw%3D%3D&dirflg=b
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https://plus.google.com/115554877253227765120 Information Innovation : "The Gross National Product does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education...
"The Gross National Product does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education or the joy of their play. It does not include the beauty of our poetry or the strength of our marriages, the intelligence of our public debate or the integrity of our public officials. It measures neither our wit nor our courage, neither our wisdom nor our learning, neither our compassion nor our devotion to our country, it measures everything in short, except that which makes life worthwhile." - Robert F. Kennedy, 1968, University of Kansas
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https://plus.google.com/102855159921588854534 Carlos Alamillo : The year 1969 Robert F. KENNEDY in Los Angeles
The year 1969 Robert F. KENNEDY in Los Angeles 
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https://plus.google.com/100730667278499258684 Heather Koroll : Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly. - Robert F. Kennedy
Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly. - Robert F. Kennedy
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https://plus.google.com/111111218626002216550 Susan O'Neill : By Robert F. Kennedy Jnr. ...America’s unsavory record of violent interventions in Syria—little-known...
By Robert F. Kennedy Jnr.
...America’s unsavory record of violent interventions in Syria—little-known to the American people yet well-known to Syrians—sowed fertile ground for the violent Islamic jihadism ...Long before our 2003 occupation of Iraq triggered the Sunni uprising that has now morphed into the Islamic State, the CIA had nurtured violent jihadism as a Cold War weapon and freighted U.S./Syrian relationships with toxic baggage.
This did not happen without controversy at home. In July 1957, following a failed coup in Syria by the CIA, my uncle, Sen. John F. Kennedy, infuriated the Eisenhower White House, the leaders of both political parties and our European allies with a milestone speech endorsing the right of self-governance in the Arab world and an end to America’s imperialist meddling in Arab countries...."
Written by Robert F. Kennedy Jnr.
Why the Arabs Don’t Want Us in Syria

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https://plus.google.com/113871897908096836672 NYU Stern School of Business : On April 20, 2016, Stern's Center for Business and Human Rights hosted a discussion between Dean Peter...
On April 20, 2016, Stern's Center for Business and Human Rights hosted a discussion between Dean Peter Henry and Kerry Kennedy, President of Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights.

Topics included the business case for human rights, Ms. Kennedy's history of human rights activism and how investment can be a game changer with respect to human rights in the business context: http://bit.ly/21hmDyf http://ow.ly/i/iTZGg
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https://plus.google.com/100166612415996524535 YSK San Francisco : Turns out Apple CEO Tim Cook is more popular than Taylor Swift and Robert Downey Jr. combined.Cook is...
Turns out Apple CEO Tim Cook is more popular than Taylor Swift and Robert Downey Jr. combined.Cook is drawing the most interest in an online auction to benefit the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights organization Photo Credit: charitybuzz.comFull article…
Lunch With Tim Cook? It’s Going to Cost You (A Lot)
Turns out Apple CEO Tim Cook is more popular than Taylor Swift and Robert Downey Jr. combined.Cook is drawing the most interest in an online auction to ben
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