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Most recent 20 results returned for keyword: annular eclipse (Search this on MAP)

https://plus.google.com/113343502910454590025 Martin Lunn : Astrognome Scrapbook Solar eclipse 103 BCE Solar eclipse 103 BCE On the 19 th July 103 BCE there was...
Astrognome Scrapbook Solar eclipse 103 BCE
Solar eclipse 103 BCE On the 19 th July 103 BCE there was an annular
eclipse of the Sun visible over North Africa and Europe.  It occurred at a time
when the Cimbri who were either Germanic or Celtic tribes crossed over into
Spain and laid the country to wa...
Astrognome Scrapbook Solar eclipse 103 BCE
Solar eclipse 103 BCE On the 19th July 103 BCE there was an annular eclipse of the Sun visible over North Africa and Europe. It occurred at a time when the Cimbri who were either Germanic or Celtic tribes crossed...
6 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/109625401881439530659 Dines Patak : Good morning everyone ...have a great weekend The picture today Is an annular eclipse 
Good morning everyone ...have a great weekend

The picture today Is an annular eclipse 
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-g1ANAgodvdY/V4miJkAt7VI/AAAAAAAAS_Q/LBZ1WQJId_oSDVmjJ_oQx1md-zVtJGTyg/w506-h750/2016%2B-%2B1
8 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/107598742302510541124 Lina Villablanca : Solar eclipse of 2010 - This was with 11 minutes and 41 seconds the longest annular solar eclipse in...
Solar eclipse of 2010 - This was with 11 minutes and 41 seconds the longest annular solar eclipse in 1000 years. It was seen as an annular eclipse across Central Africa, India, Sri Lanka and China.
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-Bjk0H3Ggb7o/V3sGiWLydtI/AAAAAAABTJo/mfqSZYjuGKAJaHfpAi4NLQt4MuO78TV_g/w506-h750/tumblr_o85whly84g1tuy5mao1_540.jpg
20 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/103262616103845627706 Francis Peter :

ANNULAR ECLIPSE OF THE SUN IN TANZANIA NATIONAL PARKS.
1st of September of 2016 tourists will be lucky to witness one of the rarest astronomical phenomenon, Annular solar Eclipse in Tanzania. The most rewarding thing is the fact that, this year the eclipse viewers will have an o...
25 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/112313938320740588688 Christian Gaya : Katavi will offer best view of annular eclipse and wildlife The scenic Katavi National Park in the southern...
Katavi will offer best view of annular eclipse and wildlife
The scenic Katavi National Park in the southern highlands of Tanzania.
This is one of the ideal places in the world to view the annular eclipse
between end of August and early September 2016. PHOTO | WIKIMEDIA
COMMONS  By Apolinari Tairo In Summary While...
Katavi will offer best view of annular eclipse and wildlife
The scenic Katavi National Park in the southern highlands of Tanzania. This is one of the ideal places in the world to view the annular eclipse between end of August and early September 2016. PHOTO | WIKIMEDIA COMMONS By A...
28 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/110319892470322831956 UTALII TANZANIA : ANNULAR ECLIPSE OF THE SUN IN TANZANIA NATIONAL PARKS By Fred Shirima. 1 st of September of 2016 tourists...
ANNULAR ECLIPSE OF THE SUN IN TANZANIA NATIONAL PARKS
By Fred Shirima. 1 st of September of 2016 tourists will be lucky to witness one of the rarest astronomical phenomenon, Annular solar Eclipse in Tanzania. The most rewarding thing is the fact
that, this year the eclipse viewers will have an opportunity to ...
ANNULAR ECLIPSE OF THE SUN IN TANZANIA NATIONAL PARKS
By Fred Shirima. 1st of September of 2016 tourists will be lucky to witness one of the rarest astronomical phenomenon, Annular solar Eclipse in Tanzania. The most rewarding thing is the fact that, this year the eclipse view...
28 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/108549088264694461594 Vanessa Worthington : What is a hybrid solar eclipse? A hybrid eclipse is a unique type of central eclipse where parts of ...
What is a hybrid solar eclipse?
A hybrid eclipse is a unique type of central eclipse where parts of the path are annular while other parts are total. This duality comes about when the vertex of the Moon's umbral shadow pierces Earth's surface at some points, but falls short of the planet along other portions of the eclipse path.

The curvature of Earth's surface brings some geographic locations along the path into the umbra while other positions are more distant and enter the antumbral rather than umbral shadow. In most cases, the hybrid eclipse begins annular, changes to total for the central portion of the path, and then converts back to annular towards the end of the path. However, some hybrid eclipses may be annular only at the beginning or at the end of the path.

A spectacular geocentric celestial event of 2005 was a rare hybrid eclipse of the Sun - a total or an annular eclipse could be seen depending on the observer's location. For Fred Espenak, aboard a gently swaying ship within the middle of the Moon's shadow track about 2,200 kilometers west of the Galapagos, the eclipse was total, the lunar silhouette exactly covering the bright solar disk for a few brief moments. His camera captured a picture of totality revealing the extensive solar corona and prominences rising above the Sun's edge.

But for Stephan Heinsius, near the end of the shadow track at Penonome Airfield, Panama, the Moon's apparent size had shrunk enough to create an annular eclipse, showing a complete annulus of the Sun's bright disk as a dramatic ring of fire. Pictures from the two locations are compared below.

How rare is such a hybrid eclipse? Calculations show that during the 21st century just 3.1% (7 out of 224) of solar eclipses are hybrid while hybrids comprise about 5% of all solar eclipses over the period 2000 BC to AD 3000. Today's hybrid solar eclipse is most widely visible beyond the central shadow track as a brief partial eclipse from northeastern Americas through Africa, and along the track in an annular phase for only the first 15 seconds.

Image & info via APOD
Image Credit & Copyright: Left: Fred Espenak - Right: Stephan Heinsius
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap131103.html

#naturalphenomena   #hybridsolareclipse   #space   #universe  
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-WkPLCVh6GgA/Vy83yqaaApI/AAAAAAACBNU/esXcKiwUtecMXWsqCCGVPnuGuqvfPlYkA/w506-h750/hybrid_merge_960.jpg
1 month ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/112106679779809070394 Astronomical Society Southern Africa (ASSA) : On 1 September, the Moon will pass in front of the Sun in an annular eclipse.  Here in South Africa ...
On 1 September, the Moon will pass in front of the Sun in an annular eclipse.  Here in South Africa we will only see a partial view of the eclipse, but we'll still feel a noticeable dimming of the Sun as it progresses.
We've set up a number of viewing spots across the country, and will be live-streaming telescopic footage of the Sun as it gets eclipsed, so you can see how the view changes with location.
You're welcome to join in, and if you have your own view (whether through a properly filtered telescope, or are just showing a pinhole projection through your webcam) we'd love to include it in the show!
1 month ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/102733402203826097264 Ozzy Stewart : What's that dot on the Sun? If you look closely, it is almost perfectly round. The dot is the result...
What's that dot on the Sun? If you look closely, it is almost perfectly round. The dot is the result of an unusual type of solar eclipse that occurred in 2006. Usually it is the Earth's Moon that eclipses the Sun. This time, the planet Mercury took a turn. Like the approach to New Moon before a solar eclipse, the phase of Mercury became a continually thinner crescent as the planet progressed toward an alignment with the Sun. Eventually the phase of Mercury dropped to zero and the dark spot of Mercury crossed our parent star. The situation could technically be labeled a Mercurian annular eclipse with an extraordinarily large ring of fire. From above the cratered planes of the night side of Mercury, the Earth appeared in its fullest phase. Hours later, as Mercury continued in its orbit, a slight crescent phase appeared again. This was ten years ago -- the next Mercurian solar eclipse will occur today

Mercury's Transit: An Unusual Spot on the Sun
Image Credit & Copyright: David Cortner
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-zY3nRaacY6M/VzBc1R-RKpI/AAAAAAAAPGk/r_4joQ1jgDsdK35Qy2WDNS0yZB-oPV3mA/w506-h750/MercuryTransit_Cortner_960.jpg
2 months ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/116729116074842175073 Raj Kumar Rawal : A beautiful young mother becomes a slum dweller in Bangladesh's capital Dhaka to avoid living in worst...
A beautiful young mother becomes a slum dweller in Bangladesh's capital Dhaka to avoid living in worst poverty in rural areas. Thousands do the same every passing  year. Now Dhaka is our latest global disaster leaving hundreds of thousands of people affected by the flooding. Let your love go out to everyone there along with mine as we continue to open the door of knowledge together. As I've writing to you these terrible recent events are tied to the Cosmic Tides. Please understand my intention is to inform not frighten.

However, the time has come to open our minds and hearts to the cosmic connection that exists between Earth and it's Solar System and indeed far beyond. We're responsible for learning to elevate our understanding by learning to understand cosmic knowledge because we are all responsible for our world. It is a vast undertaking this is true but it is essential for our very survival. The brief article I've prepared for you below is a snapshot of our situation held up against one of the worst catastrophes in recent history, Super Typhoon Yolanda of 2013. I've chosen that event because it illustrates a long awaited awakening that now must turn into firm action  ~Christina

                            Global Citizen Action is Essential

Typhoon Haiyan, known as Super Typhoon Yolanda in the Philippines, was one of the strongest tropical cyclones ever recorded, which devastated portions of Southeast Asia, particularly the Philippines, on November 8, 2013. A Total Solar Eclipse that was visible from parts of Africa and it took place just 5 days before on November 3, 2013. The eclipse was partial as seen from some parts of Asia, Europe, North America and South America as it was also a hybrid eclipse because it is both was a total and an annular eclipse. It was a tell tale sign. Yolanda was the deadliest Philippine typhoon on record killing at least 6,300 people in that country alone. Today a few years later to visit the city of Tacloban in the Philippines and report the real situation of the city, it will not be difficult to point out through imagery the unfulfilled promises and incomplete projects as it was not difficult for me virtually through online humanitarian interest and investigation. The deadly impact of Yolanda in a small underdeveloped archipelagic country like the Philippines was the impetus for climate justice advocates are involved with influencing outcomes of events such as the Paris Climate Conference. Many activists are utilizing the specter of Super Typhoon Yolanda to help convince world leaders to finally cut through the inertia and implement a more effective climate pact. My call to you is that each and every person, child and adult, need to understand and to advocate these critical pursuits as a global society. Today with so many still feeling the sting of Super Typhoon Yolanda, an event which traumatized an entire nation, many continue to debate its consequences and the inaction or slow action of concerned agencies. Bureaucrats, politicians, economists, and climate experts are still in exchange years later, speaking of what is to be learned from the disaster. Many seem to have collectively lost an urgency for the essential task that still remains. The task of progress in the lives of ordinary residents in the communities which have remained Calamity Areas up to this day. On April 22, 2016 The Philippines, along with 175 countries, signed the Paris Climate Agreement, which was the largest number of signatures any treaty has garnered on the first day. Department of Environment and Natural Resources Secretary Ramon Paje signed for the Philippines. He was joined by Senator Loren Legarda as co-head of delegation, Philippines Permanent Representative to the United Nations Ambassador. Also attending were Yparraguirre, Climate Change Commission, Secretary Emmanuel de Guzman, Undersecretary Jonas Leones and Commissioners Frances Veronica Victorio and Noel Gaerlan.

The signing ceremony was attended by Heads of States and and/or Governments and was led by President Francois Hollande, as well as Ministers of 175 countries.A lot of "Decision Makers" all in one place at one time yet ending with so little in a united action. How long will leadership discount the cosmos and arcane understanding of the Forces of Nature. How long will Billionaires be able to accomplish more through funding of philanthropic organizations than our global governments combined? When will our leaders be held accountable by conscience for the lack of organization that leads to progress at a snail's pace. Moreover, when will common men and woman truly take responsibility to engage with fellow global citizens and communities so we may pursue our most urgent matters as a global community?

As gleaned from the major headlines across the globe, Secretary Paje was reported to have said that his country will continue to cascade climate change mitigation and adaptation actions to sub-national levels and to invest in climate-resilient local economies, consistent with post 2015 international frameworks such as the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change. To secure a sustainable future, the Philippines are pursuing strategies to ensure the provision of ecosystem services and green growth to address pollution and environmental degradation.  To this end, a greenhouse gas inventory management and reporting system is being developed to create a transparent, accurate and comparable baseline of emissions. Paje said, "Too much is at stake". Developed countries need to do more in terms of dramatically raising their ambition to be compatible with the 1.5-degrees Celsius threshold, as well as raising funding contribution to the climate action plans of vulnerable countries, which require adequate, predictable and sustainable financing. Scientists at MIT say that under the current Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) the global average temperature will soar by as much as 3.7 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels by 2100. This is far above the 1.5 degree Celsius target, which, as President Hollande of France stated at the opening of the conference, 1.5 degree Celsius is the absolute ceiling for global temperature rise if we are to prevent climate catastrophe. Anything above 1.5 degrees C is a death sentence for us and for the planet. The Philippines Secretary also urged developed and developing countries alike to take urgent pre-2020 action.

At the High Level Informal Event for the early entry into force of the Paris Agreement, Senator Legarda called on countries that signed the Paris Agreement to immediately ratify the Agreement for its early entry into force. The Senator committed to rally the Philippine Senate to act on the Philippines own ratification of the Agreement. Senator Legarda has written to fellow Parliamentarians of the 43 countries making up the Climate Vulnerable Forum (CVF) urging them to do the same. To date, only 15 countries have ratified the Agreement. For the Paris Agreement to enter into force, 55 Parties, representing at least 55 percent of global emissions, must join. In my opinion, it is unconscionable that this is the best our leaders accomplished. Insofar as this isolated subject our only course of action is immediate implementation of Renewable Energy in every form and fashion possible. Renewable Energy is subject matter we are responsible to learn and indeed another conversation we must immediately engage. As Global Citizens we are all responsible to initiate this conversation wherever we find ourselves in society.

Christina Conti
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-zYMdKlJGACQ/V0CWGx8_a-I/AAAAAAAASdc/kGNflabuA8wNEVE0aaEMcG54koBplsxxA/w506-h750/GooglePost5212016.png
2 months ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/116399040511589592824 DaveDecNutrition : 4 years ago, I was running a 5K (I think it was my first) but there was also an Annular Eclipse. An ...
4 years ago, I was running a 5K (I think it was my first) but there was also an Annular Eclipse. An Annular Eclipse happens when the moon passes between the Sun and the Earth, but the Moon's apparent diameter is smaller than the Sun's, blocking most of the Sun's light, causing the Sun to look like a ring.
#fit4retirementpro #space #eclipse #tbt
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-NxqUXvmyTdY/Vz28ZLOMSVI/AAAAAAAACBk/3Y4oRTtJTD8HlfUQfekq2bfU5pINgjVtA/w506-h750/770d96a8-c4a6-495c-a33e-fac3d28192ac
2 months ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/102846019922776416432 Today's Memory : Mercury's Transit: An Unusual Spot on the Sun Image Credit & Copyright: David Cortner http://apod.nasa.gov...
Mercury's Transit: An Unusual Spot on the Sun
Image Credit & Copyright: David Cortner
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap160508.html

What's that dot on the Sun? If you look closely, it is almost perfectly round. The dot is the result of an unusual type of solar eclipse that occurred in 2006. Usually it is the Earth's Moon that eclipses the Sun. This time, the planet Mercury took a turn. Like the approach to New Moon before a solar eclipse, the phase of Mercury became a continually thinner crescent as the planet progressed toward an alignment with the Sun. Eventually the phase of Mercury dropped to zero and the dark spot of Mercury crossed our parent star. The situation could technically be labeled a Mercurian annular eclipse with an extraordinarily large ring of fire. From above the cratered planes of the night side of Mercury, the Earth appeared in its fullest phase. Hours later, as Mercury continued in its orbit, a slight crescent phase appeared again. This was ten years ago -- the next Mercurian solar eclipse will occur tomorrow.
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-ab-kJ1gVoTs/Vy7FPflLNqI/AAAAAAABVFg/hTlw7h0p21A6fiSzI36ox1kUuRIRQoGyg/w506-h750/MercuryTransit_Cortner_1200.jpg
2 months ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/115080437018928069989 SpaceTime : May 9, 2016 - (APoD NASA) Mercury's Transit: An Unusual Spot on the Sun What's that dot on the Sun...
May 9, 2016 - (APoD NASA)

Mercury's Transit: An Unusual Spot on the Sun

What's that dot on the Sun? If you look closely, it is almost perfectly round. The dot is the result of an unusual type of solar eclipse that occurred in 2006.

Usually it is the Earth's Moon that eclipses the Sun. This time, the planet Mercury took a turn. Like the approach to New Moon before a solar eclipse, the phase of Mercury became a continually thinner crescent as the planet progressed toward an alignment with the Sun. Eventually the phase of Mercury dropped to zero and the dark spot of Mercury crossed our parent star.

The situation could technically be labeled a Mercurian annular eclipse with an extraordinarily large ring of fire. From above the cratered planes of the night side of Mercury, the Earth appeared in its fullest phase. Hours later, as Mercury continued in its orbit, a slight crescent phase appeared again. This was ten years ago - the next Mercurian solar eclipse will occur tomorrow.

Image Credit & Copyright: David Cortner
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap160508.html
APOD: 2016 May 8 - Mercurys Transit: An Unusual Spot on the Sun
A different astronomy and space science related image is featured each day, along with a brief explanation.
2 months ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/102397761901042711229 Leslie McCullough-Payne : Tomorrow, if you can see the sun, it is suppose to be cloudy here Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover...
Tomorrow, if you can see the sun, it is suppose to be cloudy here

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2016 May 8


Mercury's Transit: An Unusual Spot on the Sun
Image Credit & Copyright: David Cortner
Explanation: What's that dot on the Sun? If you look closely, it is almost perfectly round. The dot is the result of an unusual type of solar eclipse that occurred in 2006. Usually it is the Earth's Moon that eclipses the Sun. This time, the planet Mercury took a turn. Like the approach to New Moon before a solar eclipse, the phase of Mercury became a continually thinner crescent as the planet progressed toward an alignment with the Sun. Eventually the phase of Mercury dropped to zero and the dark spot of Mercury crossed our parent star. The situation could technically be labeled a Mercurian annular eclipse with an extraordinarily large ring of fire. From above the cratered planes of the night side of Mercury, the Earth appeared in its fullest phase. Hours later, as Mercury continued in its orbit, a slight crescent phase appeared again. This was ten years ago -- the next Mercurian solar eclipse will occur tomorrow.

NASA Coverage: Tomorrow's Transit of Mercury across the Sun
Tomorrow's picture: the next hubble
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https://plus.google.com/115593299225930499338 Sandara Mae Narraga : As seen from the Earth, a solar eclipse is a type of eclipse that occurs when the Moon passes between...
As seen from the Earth, a solar eclipse is a type of eclipse that occurs when the Moon passes between the Sun and Earth, and the Moon fully or partially blocks ("occults") the Sun. This can happen only at new moon, when the Sun and the Moon are in conjunction as seen from Earth in an alignment referred to as syzygy. In a total eclipse, the disk of the Sun is fully obscured by the Moon. In partial and annular eclipses, only part of the Sun is obscured.

If the Moon were in a perfectly circular orbit, a little closer to the Earth, and in the same orbital plane, there would be total solar eclipses every month. However, the Moon's orbit is inclined (tilted) at more than 5 degrees to the Earth's orbit around the Sun (see ecliptic), so its shadow at new moon usually misses Earth. Earth's orbit is called the ecliptic plane as the Moon's orbit must cross this plane in order for an eclipse (both solar as well as lunar) to occur. In addition, the Moon's actual orbit is elliptical, often taking it far enough away from Earth that its apparent size is not large enough to block the Sun totally. The orbital planes cross each other at a line of nodes resulting in at least two, and up to five, solar eclipses occurring each year; no more than two of which can be total eclipses.



A solar eclipse occurs when the moon gets between Earth and the sun, and the moon casts a shadow over Earth. A solar eclipse can only take place at the phase of new moon, when the moon passes directly between the sun and Earth and its shadows fall upon Earth’s surface. But whether the alignment produces a total solar eclipse, a partial solar eclipse or an annular solar eclipse depends on several factors, all explained below.
The fact that an eclipse can occur at all is a fluke of celestial mechanics and time. Since the moon formed about 4.5 billion years ago, it has been gradually moving away from Earth (by about 1.6 inches, or 4 centimeters per year). Right now the moon is at the perfect distance to appear in our sky exactly the same size as the sun, and therefore block it out. But this is not always true.
The last solar eclipse was a total eclipse on March 20, 2015.



Here is a schedule of upcoming solar eclipses:
Sept. 13, 2015: Partial eclipse. Time of greatest eclipse: 6:54 UT. Visible from southern Africa, south Indian Ocean and Antarctica.
March 9, 2016: Total eclipse. Time of greatest eclipse: 1:58 UT. Visible from Australia, Sumatra, Borneo.
Sept. 1, 2016: Annular eclipse. Time of greatest eclipse: 9:08 UT. Visible from Atlantic Ocean, central Africa, Madagasgar, Indian Ocean.

There are four types of solar eclipses: total, annular, partial and hybrid. Here’s what causes each type:
Total solar eclipses
These are a happy accident of nature. The sun's 864,000-mile diameter is fully 400 times greater than that of our puny moon, which measures just about 2,160 miles. But the moon also happens to be about 400 times closer to Earth than the sun (the ratio varies as both orbits are elliptical), and as a result, when the orbital planes intersect and the distances align favorably, the new moon can appear to completely blot out the disk of the sun. On the average a total eclipse occurs somewhere on Earth about every 18 months.
There are actually two types of shadows: the umbra is that part of the shadow where all sunlight is blocked out. The umbra takes the shape of a dark, slender cone. It is surrounded by the penumbra, a lighter, funnel-shaped shadow from which sunlight is partially obscured.
During a total solar eclipse, the moon casts its umbra upon Earth's surface; that shadow can sweep a third of the way around the planet in just a few hours. Those who are fortunate enough to be positioned in the direct path of the umbra will see the sun's disk diminish into a crescent as the moon's dark shadow rushes toward them across the landscape.
During the brief period of totality, when the sun is completely covered, the beautiful corona — the tenuous outer atmosphere of the sun — is revealed.
Totality may last as long as 7 minutes 31 seconds, though
most total eclipses are usually much shorter.
                                          

If you want to see a solar eclipse, you must be in the path of the Moon's shadow, which has 3 distinct parts:
Umbra: The innermost and darkest part of the Moon's shadow. The Sun's light is blocked in places on Earth where the umbra falls. The Sun's disc is not visible anymore.
Penumbra: The outermost and the lightest part of the Moon's shadow. Only part of the Sun's light is blocked in places on Earth where the Moon's penumbra falls. The Sun's disc is partly visible.
Antumbra: The Moon's antumbra lies beyond the umbra. It appears with the growing distance from the Moon. From Earth, the Moon appears smaller and cannot completely block the Sun, so the Sun's outer rim is still seen.
A partial solar eclipse occurs when only the penumbra (the partial shadow) passes over you. In these cases, a part of the sun always remains in view during the eclipse. How much of the sun remains in view depends on the specific circumstances.
Usually the penumbra gives just a glancing blow to our planet over the polar regions; in such cases, places far away from the poles but still within the zone of the penumbra might not see much more than a small scallop of the sun hidden by the moon. In a different scenario, those who are positioned within a couple of thousand miles of the path of a total eclipse will see a partial eclipse.
The closer you are to the path of totality, the greater the solar obscuration. If, for instance, you are positioned just outside of the path of the total eclipse, you will see the sun wane to a narrow crescent, then thicken up again as the shadow passes by.

Eclipses in 2015
March 20: Total solar eclipse
April 4: Total lunar eclipse
September 13: Partial solar eclipse
September 28: Total lunar eclipse
Eclipses in 2016
March 9: Total solar eclipse
March 23: Penumbral lunar eclipse
September 1: Annular solar eclipse
September 16: Penumbral lunar eclipse

There are 4 types of solar eclipses and they are determined by what part of the Moon's shadow falls on the Earth:
Total: A total solar eclipse takes place when the Moon completely covers the Sun and casts its umbra and penumbra on Earth. A total eclipse of the Sun can only take place when the Moon is at perigee. You can experience a total solar eclipse if you're in the path of the Moon's umbra. You can see a partial eclipse at a place where the Sun's penumbra falls.
Partial: Partial solar eclipses happen when the Moon does not completely cover the Sun's disc and casts only its penumbra on Earth.
Annular: Annular solar eclipses occur when the Moon's antumbra falls on Earth. The Moon's disc covers the center of the Sun's disc, leaving the Sun's outer edges uncovered. An annular eclipse of the Sun can only take place when the Moon is at apogee.
Hybrid: Hybrid eclipses are rare. They happen when an annular eclipse turns into a total solar eclipse.






Fortnight (approximate two-week) separation between solar and lunar eclipses. A solar eclipse always takes place within one fortnight of any lunar eclipse. For instance, in 2015, the total solar eclipse on March 20 comes one fortnight before the Blood Moon total lunar eclipse of April 4. The partial solar eclipse on September 13 occurs one fortnight before the Blood Moon total lunar eclipse of September 28. In 2016, the total solar eclipse of March 9 happens one fortnight before the penumbral lunar eclipse of March 23; and the September 1 annular solar eclipse takes place one fortnight before the September 16 penumbral lunar eclipse.
Somewhat rarely, a solar eclipse can occur one fortnight before and after a lunar eclipse. This will next happen in the year 2018:
July 13: Partial solar eclipse
July 27: Total lunar eclipse
August 11: Partial solar eclipse
Somewhat rarely, a lunar eclipse can come one fortnight before and after a solar eclipse. This will next happen in the year 2020:
June 5: Penumbral lunar eclipse
June 21: Annular solar eclipse
July 5: Penumbral lunar eclipse


An annular eclipse, though a rare and amazing sight, is far different from a total one. The sky will darken ... somewhat; a sort of weird “counterfeit twilight” since so much of the sun still shows. The annular eclipse is a subspecies of a partial eclipse, not total. The maximum duration for an annular eclipse is 12 minutes 30 seconds.
However, an annular solar eclipse is similar to a total eclipse in that the moon appears to pass centrally across the sun. The difference is, the moon is too small to cover the disk of the sun completely. Because the moon circles Earth in an elliptical orbit, its distance from Earth can vary from 221,457 miles to 252,712 miles. But the dark shadow cone of the moon’s umbra can extend out for no longer than 235,700 miles; that’s less than the moon’s average distance from Earth.
So if the moon is at some greater distance, the tip of the umbra does not reach Earth. During such an eclipse, the antumbra, a theoretical continuation of the umbra, reaches the ground, and anyone situated within it can look up past either side of the umbra and see an annulus, or “ring of fire” around the moon. A good analogy is putting a penny atop a nickel, the penny being the moon, the nickel being the sun.

Since looking directly at the Sun can lead to permanent eye damage or blindness, special eye protection or indirect viewing techniques are used when viewing a solar eclipse. It is technically safe to view only the total phase of a total solar eclipse with the unaided eye and without protection; however, this is a dangerous practice, as most people are not trained to recognize the phases of an eclipse, which can span over two hours while the total phase can only last up to 7.5 minutes for any one location. People referred to as eclipse chasers or umbraphiles will travel to remote locations to observe or witness predicted central solar eclipses.


The magnitude of an eclipse is the ratio of the apparent size of the Moon to the apparent size of the Sun during an eclipse. An eclipse that occurs when the Moon is near its closest distance to Earth (i.e., near its perigee) can be a total eclipse because the Moon will appear to be large enough to completely cover the Sun's bright disk, or photosphere; a total eclipse has a magnitude greater than 1. Conversely, an eclipse that occurs when the Moon is near its farthest distance from Earth (i.e., near its apogee) can only be an annular eclipse because the Moon will appear to be slightly smaller than the Sun; the magnitude of an annular eclipse is less than 1. Slightly more solar eclipses are annular than total because, on average, the Moon lies too far from Earth to cover the Sun completely. A hybrid eclipse occurs when the magnitude of an eclipse changes during the event from less to greater than one, so the eclipse appears to be total at some locations on Earth and annular at other locations.



Hybrid solar eclipses
These are also called annular-total (“A-T”) eclipses. This special type of eclipse occurs when the moon’s distance is near its limit for the umbra to reach Earth. In most cases, an A-T eclipse starts as an annular eclipse because the tip of the umbra falls just short of making contact with Earth; then it becomes total, because the roundness of the planet reaches up and intercepts the shadow tip near the middle of the path, then finally it returns to annular toward the end of the path.
Because the moon appears to pass directly in front of the sun, total, annular and hybrid eclipses are also called “central” eclipses to distinguish them from eclipses that are merely partial.
Of all solar eclipses, about 28 percent are total; 35 percent are partial; 32 percent annular; and just 5 percent are hybrids.

Predictions of solar eclipses
Eclipses do not happen at every new moon, of course. This is because the moon’s orbit is tilted just over 5 degrees relative to Earth’s orbit around the sun. For this reason, the moon’s shadow usually passes either above or below Earth, so a solar eclipse doesn’t occur.
But as a rule, at least twice each year (and sometimes as many as five times in a year), a new moon will align itself in just such a way to eclipse the sun. That alignment point is called a node. Depending on how closely the new moon approaches a node will determine whether a particular eclipse is central or partial. And of course, the moon’s distance from the Earth — and to a lesser degree, Earth’s distance from the sun — will ultimately determine whether a central eclipse is total, annular or a hybrid.
And these alignments don’t happen haphazardly, for after a specific interval of time, an eclipse will repeat itself or return. This interval is known as the Saros cycle and was known as far back as the days of the early Chaldean astronomers some 28 centuries ago. The word Saros means “repetition” and is equal to 18 years, 11⅓ days (or a day less or more depending on the number of leap years that have intervened). After this interval, the relative positions of the sun and moon relative to a node are nearly the same as before. That third of a day in the interval causes the path of each eclipse of a series to be displaced in longitude a third of the way around Earth to the west with respect to its predecessor.
For example, on March 29, 2006, a total eclipse swept across parts of western and northern Africa and then across southern Asia. One Saros later, on April 8, 2024, this eclipse will recur, except instead of Africa and Asia, it will track across northern Mexico, the central and eastern United States and the Maritime provinces of Canada.



As a solar eclipse approaches, the mainstream media often will provide a variety of warnings and advisories against looking at the sun with bare eyes, as blindness could ensue. This has given most people the idea that eclipses are dangerous.
Not so!
It’s the sun that is dangerous — all the time! The sun constantly emits invisible infrared rays that can damage your eyes. Ordinarily, we have no reason to gaze at the sun. An eclipse gives us a reason, but we shouldn’t.
There are safe ways, however . . .
By far, the safest way to view a solar eclipse is to construct a “pinhole camera.” A pinhole or small opening is used to form an image of the sun on a screen placed about 3 feet (or about 1 meter) behind the opening. Binoculars or a small telescope mounted on a tripod can also be used to project a magnified image of the sun onto a white card. The farther away the card, the larger you can focus the image. Look for sunspots. Notice that the sun appears somewhat darker around its limb or edge. This method of solar viewing is safe so long as you remember not to look through the binoculars or telescope when they are pointed toward the sun; put another way, never look directly at the sun when any part of its blindingly bright surface is visible.
A variation on the pinhole theme is the “pinhole mirror.” Cover a pocket-mirror with a piece of paper that has a ¼-inch hole punched in it. Open a sun-facing window and place the covered mirror on the sunlit sill so it reflects a disk of light onto the far wall inside. The disk of light is an image of the sun’s face. The farther away from the wall is the better; the image will be only 1 inch across for every 9 feet (or 3 centimeters for every 3 meters) from the mirror. Modeling clay works well to hold the mirror in place. Experiment with different-sized holes in the paper. Again, a large hole makes the image bright, but fuzzy, and a small one makes it dim but sharp. Darken the room as much as possible. Be sure to try this out beforehand to make sure the mirror’s optical quality is good enough to project a clean, round image. Of course, don’t let anyone look at the sun in the mirror.
If you’re around leafy trees, look at the shadow cast by them during the partial phases. What do you see? Is it worth a photograph? You will see scores of partially eclipsed suns projected through pinhole gaps between the leaves. This is caused by diffraction, a property of light. According to Vince Huegele, an optical physicist at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the light rays do not shoot straight by the rim of the gaps, or a pinhole, but bend around the edge. This wave effect creates a pattern of rings that resembles a bull's eye.
Acceptable filters for unaided visual solar observations include aluminized Mylar. Some astronomy dealers carry Mylar filter material specially designed for solar observing. Also acceptable is shade 14 arc-welder’s glass, available for just a few dollars at welding supply shops. Of course, it is always a good idea to test your filters and/or observing techniques before eclipse day.
Unacceptable filters include sunglasses, old color film negatives, black-and-white film that contains no silver, photographic neutral-density filters and polarizing filters. Although these materials have very low visible-light transmittance levels, they transmit an unacceptably high level of near-infrared radiation that can cause a thermal retinal burn. The fact that the sun appears dim, or that you feel no discomfort when looking at the sun through these types of filters, is no guarantee that your eyes are safe.
There is one time when you can safely look directly at the sun: during a total eclipse, when the sun's disk is entirely covered. During those few precious seconds or minutes, the magnificent corona shines forth in all its glory surrounding the darkened sun; a marvelous fringe of pearly white light. It differs in size, in tints and patterns from eclipse to eclipse. It is always faint and delicate, with a sheen like a pale aurora. It has a variable appearance. Sometimes it has a soft continuous look; at other times, long rays of it shoot out in three or four directions. It may stand out from the disk in filmy petals and streamers. But when the sun begins to again emerge into view, the corona quickly disappears and you’ll need to protect your eyes once again.

First contact—when the Moon's limb (edge) is exactly tangential to the Sun's limb.
Second contact—starting with Baily's Beads (caused by light shining through valleys on the Moon's surface) and the diamond ring effect. Almost the entire disk is covered.
Totality—the Moon obscures the entire disk of the Sun and only the solar corona is visible.
Third contact—when the first bright light becomes visible and the Moon's shadow is moving away from the observer. Again a diamond ring may be observed.
Fourth contact—when the trailing edge of the Moon ceases to overlap with the solar disk and the eclipse ends.


As best as we can determine, the earliest record of a solar eclipse occurred over four millennia ago. In China, it was believed that the gradual blotting out of the sun was caused by a dragon who was attempting to devour the sun, and it was the duty of the court astronomers to shoot arrows, beat drums and raise whatever cacophony they could to frighten the dragon away.
In the ancient Chinese classic Shujing (or Book of Documents) is the account of Hsi and Ho, two court astronomers who were caught completely unaware by a solar eclipse, having gotten drunk just before the event began. In the aftermath, Zhong Kang, the fourth emperor of the Xia dynasty ordered that Hsi and Ho be punished by having their heads chopped off. The eclipse in question was that of Oct. 22 in the year 2134 B.C.
In the Bible, in the book of Amos 8:9, are the words, “I will cause the sun to go down at noon, and I will darken the Earth in the clear day.” Biblical scholars believe this is a reference to a celebrated eclipse observed at Nineveh in ancient Assyria on June 15, 763 B.C. An Assyrian tablet also attests to the event.
A solar eclipse even stopped a war.
According to the historian Herodotus, there was a five-year war that raged between the Lydians and the Medes. As the war was about to move into its sixth year, a Greek sage, Thales of Miletus foretold to the Ionians that the time was soon approaching when day would turn to night. On May 17, 603 B.C. the sun faded away just as Thales had alluded that it would. So believing that it was a sign from above, the combatants called a truce, which was cemented by a double marriage, for, as Herodotus wrote: “Without some strong bond, there is little of security to be found in men’s covenants.”
And giving new meaning to the term, “Scared to death,” is the timid emperor Louis of Bavaria, the son of Charlemagne, who witnessed an unusually long total eclipse of the sun on May 5, A.D. 840, which lasted for over five minutes.  But no sooner had the sun begun to emerge back into view, Louis was so overwhelmed by what he had just seen that he died of fright!


Astronomers have learned much by studying eclipses and by the 18th century, observations of solar eclipses were recognized as providing veritable treasure troves of astronomical information, though sometimes getting that information wasn’t easy.
Samuel Williams, a professor at Harvard, led an expedition to Penobscot Bay, Maine, to observe the total solar eclipse of Oct. 27, 1780. As it turned out, this eclipse took place during the Revolutionary War, and Penobscot Bay lay behind enemy lines. Fortunately, the British granted the expedition safe passage, citing the interest of science above political differences.
And yet in the end, it was all for naught.
Williams apparently made a crucial error in his computations and inadvertently positioned his men at Islesboro — just outside the path of totality — likely finding this out with a heavy heart when the narrowing crescent of sunlight slid completely around the dark edge of the moon and then started to thicken!
During a total solar eclipse, a few ruby-red spots may seem to hover around the jet-black disk of the moon. Those are solar prominences, tongues of incandescent hydrogen gas rising above the surface of the sun. During the total eclipse of Aug. 18, 1868, the French astronomer Pierre Janssen trained his spectroscope on the prominences and discovered a new chemical element. Two English astronomers, J. Norman Lockyer and Edward Frankland, later named it “helium,” from the Greek helios (the sun). The gas was not identified on Earth until 1895.
And because sunlight is blocked during a total eclipse, some of the brighter stars and planets can be observed in the darkened sky. Under such conditions astronomers were able to test part of Einstein’s now-celebrated general theory of relativity. That theory predicted that light from stars beyond the sun would bend from a straight path in a certain way as it passed the sun. The positions of stars photographed near the sun’s edge during a total eclipse on May 29, 1919, were compared with photographs of the same region of the sky taken at night; the results strongly supported Einstein’s theory.
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What is an annular eclipse and what causes them? #Earth
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https://plus.google.com/108307837704621392267 PaRoCelSo OrtoMetaPara : ★★Today - Solar Eclipse - Surya Grahan ★★ ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ Connect to all the 9 planets simultaneously...
★★Today - Solar Eclipse - Surya Grahan ★★
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Connect to all the 9 planets simultaneously.
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A Solar eclipse (Surya Grahana) was witnessed on 9th March 2016 (Wednesday) on the lunar day of Maagha Bahula Amaavaasya (New Moon day). It was a Total/Partial Solar Eclipse occurring at the Moon’s descending node (Kethugrashta) with the eclipse starting before Sunrise (Grasthodaya).

This eclipse is visible in South East Asia including India, Nepal, Thailand, Indonesia, South Korea, China, Japan, Australia, North Pacific Ocean.

In India this eclipse will be visible as a partial eclipse in most of the parts except some of the West and North-West parts of the country starting from the time of Sunrise. Hence, duration may vary according to Sunrise time.

Eclipse related austerities like Snaana, Japa, Tharpana etc. need to be observed only in those places where eclipse is visible starting from Sunrise time. Hence, please check the visibility of the eclipse and local Sunrise time and follow accordingly.

Astrologically, this eclipse is occurring in the constellation of Poorvabhadra Nakshathra in the zodiac sign Aquarius (Kumbha Raasi) where incidentally KETHU is transiting. Jupiter (Guru) is the star Lord for Poorvabhadra Nakshathra and Saturn (Shani) is the sign Lord for Kumbha Raasi.

★★★★ ECLIPSE (Grahana) - A Celestial Splendour ★★★★

Eclipse is a natural phenomenon that we come across regularly at least twice in a year. Occurrence of eclipse is always fascinating and the spectacular event leads to never ending thirst for scientific, spiritual, astrological and sociological research. Whenever there is an eclipse generally we come across certain terminology being used and one will always get perplexed with these jargons. To alleviate confusion an attempt is made through this post bringing together commonly used eclipse related terms and their meaning in a codified manner.

★★★★★★★★ Eclipse ★★★★★★★★

Eclipses are caused by the powerful alignment of Sun, the Moon and Earth. Best known are the Lunar Eclipse when the Earth blocks the Sun’s light from the Moon and Solar Eclipse when the Moon blocks the Sun’s light from small portion of the Earth. During a Lunar eclipse Moon enters the shadow of the earth and at Solar eclipse Moon enters the Sun’s disc.

Literally speaking Eclipse is a Latin/Greek word; Eclipsis-Ekleipsis-Ekleipein meaning abandonment, fail to appear, obscuring (covering) of one celestial body (star) by another, a temporary or permanent dimming or cutting off of light, a disgraceful or humiliating end or downfall, to overshadow or surpass, to hide from view, to block passage of all or a part of one celestial body into the shadow of another. Scientifically, it is the disappearance of the whole or a part of the Sun when the Moon comes between it and the Earth or disappearance of the Moon when the Earth’s shadow falls across it.

★★★★★★★★ Grahana ★★★★★★★★

In Sanskrit Eclipse is known as Grahana meaning, held forcibly or to seize or afflicted because of being captured. It also means to absorb or swallow. In general grahana means acceptance. An eclipse is also known as Uparaaga in Sanskrit. If it is solar eclipse it is known as Suryoparaaga and if it is lunar eclipse it is known as Chandroparaaga.

★★★★★★★★ Solar Eclipse (Surya Grahana) ★★★★★★★★

A Solar Eclipse or Surya Grahana can occur only on the day of Amaavaasya (on a new Moon day),when the Moon is in its new phase, when the Sun and Moon are in conjunction as seen from the Earth. In a solar eclipse Moon is the eclipsing body, passing between Earth and Sun while casting a travelling shadow across Earth’s lighted surface so that the Sun is wholly or partially obscured (covered).

★★★★★★★★ Types of Eclipses ★★★★★★★★

There are four types of eclipses, total, annular, hybrid and partial. A total eclipse when Sun/Moon is completely obscured. Total eclipse (Sampoorna Grahana) is a rare event though it occurs. An Annular Eclipse when the Sun and Moon are exactly in line, but size of the Moon is apparently smaller than that of the Sun. A Hybrid eclipse that is intermediate between total and annular eclipse. A partial eclipse, when the Sun and Moon are not exactly in line and the celestial body is only partially obscured.

★★★★★★★★ Grasthodaya ★★★★★★★★

Grastha means possessed, seized, captured, or swallowed and Udaya means rising time. Grasthodaya means, rising of Sun (sunrise) or Moon (Moonrise) when the eclipse is in progress (solar/lunar) as the case may be. Precisely Grahana (eclipse) would have started already before Sunrise/Moonrise and Sparsha is not visible while Moksha alone is visible.

★★★★★★★★ Grasthaastha ★★★★★★★★

Astha means disappear, setting time, vanished. Grasthaastha means an eclipse (solar/lunar) which is in progress at the time of Sunset or Moonset as the case may be. Precisely Grahana (eclipse) would not have ended before Sunset or Moonset. In this case Sparsha is visible while the Moksha is not visible.

Khagraasa means total eclipse (solar/lunar)

Khandagraasa means partial eclipse (solar/lunar)

★★★★★★★★ Eclipse Phases ★★★★★★★★

There will be three phases during an eclipse. They are Sparsha, Madhya and Moksha. Sparsha means to touch. It is the phase when the eclipse begins and obscuring of one celestial body over the other becomes visible. Madhya is the phase when the eclipse is at its peak when the disk is completely covered depending on the totality of the eclipse. Moksha is the phase when the eclipse starts receding and the shadow moves away from the celestial body that marks the end of the eclipse. Visibility of all the three phases generally depends on climatic conditions at the time of eclipse. In case of total eclipse (sampoorna grahana) both Sparsha and Moksha are visible.

★★ Parvakala...

Entire period of eclipse is said to be a parvakala. Hence during this period offering prayer, punascharana of upadesa mantra, Pithru tarpana (thila) and dana (charity) are prescribed and considered to be highly sacred and celestial. It is said that bath at the beginning of eclipse, prayer, punascharana of upadesa mantra, tarpana during the mid time, charity (dana) during the closing time and bath again after the eclipse are very sacred and celestial and will have multiple effect. Chanting of Vedic manthras/sacred Sthothram will ward off the negative energy that gets activated during eclipse and protects from all negativity.

★★ Vedha Vichaara...

Eclipse is not an auspicious moment. Vedha means an affliction (pain or grief) to the celestial body Sun/Moon as the case may be. This period of pain or grief to the celestial body is spiritually known as Vedha which is not an auspicious period. It is considered as a mourning period. Just like one cannot or does not feel like eating or drinking in the event of a calamity or mishappening at home, similarly it is prescribed to abstain from eating or drinking during the hour of grief (Vedha) to the celestial body while the universal repositioning is taking place.

According to the sacred texts like Dharma Shastras, duration of Vedha during Eclipse is based on the concept of Prahara or Yaama which indicates the time element. A Prahara is a unit of time equivalent to 1/8th of a day and similarly a Yaama is also a unit of time which is equivalent to three hours.

Inauspicious period otherwise known as Vedha begins about four Praharas/Yaamaas before solar eclipse and three praharas/Yaamaas before lunar eclipse. That means Vedha begins 12 hours (30 ghatis) before the commencement of a solar eclipse and 9 hours (22½ ghatis) before a lunar eclipse begins in general.

In case it is Lunar eclipse and Grasthodaya (eclipse already in progress at the time of Moonrise) Vedha will be for four Praharaas/Yaamaas. That means it begins 12 hours before the commencement of lunar eclipse.

★★★★★★★★ Dharbha (Kusa Grass) ★★★★★★★★

We find in Hindu philosophy people use Dharbha (Kusa Grass) during eclipse time for protection of water and food items from getting contaminated. Dharbha Grass is identified with Lord Vishnu and is believed to possess the power to purify anything. It is an age old tradition in Hindu families to cover the food items with Dharbha during eclipse to protect them from harmful ultra violet radiation.

★★★★★ Eclipse (Grahana) from a Hindu perspective ★★★★★
(Significance of Rahu/Kethu during Eclipse)

Pouranic reference to eclipse can be found in Srimad Bhagavatha; Mahabharatha and other Vishnu related puranas. According to Hindu philosophy it is believed that eclipses are caused by Rahu and Kethu. In Bhagavatha purana a sizeable reference as to why Rahu and Kethu are responsible for solar and lunar eclipses is made in the context of churning of the sea, origin of the pot of Amruta, and Lord Maha Vishnu taking the form of a Mohini (Mohini Avathara) to help the devathas. In Navagraha Sthothram composed by sage Sri Vedavyasa description of Rahu is well suited to the reference of an eclipse.

Ardha Kaayam Mahaa Veeram
Chandraaditya Vimardhanam
Simhikagarbha-sambhootham
Tham Raahum Pranamaamyaham

Astronomically Rahu and Kethu denote two points of intersection of the paths of the Sun and Moon as they move on the celestial sphere responsible for creating shadow effect on Sun and Moon during eclipse. They are called north and south lunar nodes (ascending and descending nodes). The fact that eclipses occur when Sun and Moon are at one of these points gives rise to an impression of swallowing of the Sun/Moon. An eclipse (solar/lunar) could be Rahugrastha where ascending node Rahu is involved or could be Kethugrastha where the descending node Kethu is involved.

★★★★★★ Schedule of the current Solar Eclipse ★★★★★★

The solar eclipse that is taking place on March 9th 2016 is providing a rare time window to connect to all the 9 planets simultaneously. The New Moon will be just 3 minutes away from the South Node Ketu, placing themselves at 27:57 degrees and 27:54 degrees in the Jupiter star PURVABHADRAPADA, intercepting the light of the Sun, causing the solar eclipse. Thus eclipse will take place in the star PURVA BHADRAPADA, ruled by Jupiter in the sign AQUARIUS. Adding to the speciality, Jupiter will be aspecting the eclipse from its position in Leo.

The rarity of the event is due to the Jupiter Connection, with all the rest of the planets. In other words, all the 9 planets have placed themselves strategically, so as to display their excellent team dynamics.

★★ Nine Planet Team dynamics in full swing

The 9 planets have split themselves as 3 groups
Jupiter + Rahu in Leo
Mars + Saturn in Scorpio
Sun + Moon+ Ketu + Mercury + Venus in Aquarius
All 3 groups are SQUARE to each other; that is, they are occupying 4-7-10 positions to each other.
This is a special Yoga. Involving oneself in prayer and chanting mantra will bring good transformation, fulfilment of desires, accomplishment of goal, get rid of negative energies etc.

Date of Eclipse: 09.03.2016

Weekday: Wednesday (Budhavaara)

Lunar Day: Sri Manmathanaama Samvatsara Maagha Bahula Amaavaasya

Type of Eclipse: Total/Partial Solar Eclipse (Kethugrastha Grasthodya Surya Grahana)

Visibility (India): From the time of Sunrise (check Sunrise time locally)

Visibility (others): South East Asia including India, Nepal, Thailand, Indonesia, South Korea, Japan, Australia, North Pacific Ocean.

Non-visible areas in India: Some of the non visible areas are Mumbai, Pune. Vadodara, Surat, Ahmedabad, Jaipur, Ludhiana, Amritsar, Udaipur, Chandigarh, Panaji, Mangalore, Udupi, Hubli;

Eclipse Time (as per IST): Ranging from 05.46 hrs to 06.54 hrs (depending on the place of visibility and sunrise time);

Vedha: Starts from Sunset (08.03.2016) till end of eclipse;

★★★★★★★★ Astrological details of the Eclipse ★★★★★★★★

Eclipse Sign: Kumbha Raasi (Aquarius);

Eclipse constellation: Poorvabhadra Nakshathra;

★★★★★★★★ Effect on the zodiac signs ★★★★★★★★

Negative results: Kumbha (Aquarius); Meena (Pisces); Karkataka (Cancer); Vrischika (Scorpio)

Mixed results: Thula (Libra); Makara (Capricorn); Mithuna (Gemini); Simha (Leo);

Auspicious results: Dhanus (Sagittarius); Mesha (Aries); Vrushabha (Taurus); Kanya (Virgo)

Since eclipse is occurring in Kumbha Raasi (Aquarius) Poorvabhadra Nakshathra, those who are born in Poorvabhadra constellation and Moon sign of Kumbha Raasi may have to perform Grahana Dosha Shanti.

★★★ WHAT IS TO BE DONE DURING AN ECLIPSE TIME? ★★★
(Grahana Vichara)

Eclipse is the most opportune time to perform…

Snaana (Sachela snaana) before and after the Eclipse;

Prayer;

Punascharana of Upadesa Manthras (eg. Gayathri manthra),

Pithru Tharpana;

Giving charity;

Chanting of Vedic manthras/sacred stothras during eclipse will ward off the negative energy that gets activated during eclipse and protects from all negativity.

Those who are eligible (Tharpanaadhikari) should give Sarva Pithru Tharpana to fore-fathers with black Thila (Sesame) seeds with proper sankalpa during eclipse time.

During Vedha period, nithya karma like Snana, Sandhyavandana can be performed.

Snana (taking bath) after the Eclipse is a must and thereafter food can be taken after offering prayer depending on timings.

★★★★★ SUGGESTED PRAYERS (Eclipse specific) ★★★★★

Specific prayers to Lord Vishnu; Lord Sri Rama, Lord Hanuman; Sun God; Guru Sri Raaghavendra are required to be made during eclipse. Some of the useful prayers suggested during eclipse time are…

Gayathri Manthra Japa;
Sri Vishnu Sahasra Naama Stothra;
Sri Nrusimha Kavacham/Runa Vimochana Sri Nrusimha Stothra;
Sri Sanaischarakrutha Nrusimha Stuthi;
Sri Rama Raksha Stothra;
Sri Venkatesha Stothra (Brahmanda Purana);
Sri Venkateswara Vajra Kavacha Stothra;
Sri Hari-Vayu Stuthi/Yantroddhaaraka Hanumad Stothra;
Khila Vayu Stuthi;
Sri Raghavendra Stothra/Kavacha/Ashtaakshari;

Since the Eclipse is Kethu Grastha, praying Lord Ganehsa is also suggested;

One may choose any one or more of the above or any other useful Divine prayer based on their individual faith and according to their sampradaya; while the above list is only indicative but not exhaustive.

Those who cannot recite them can at least resort to chanting of...

Naaraayana Ashtaakshari/Dwadasaakshari;(or)
Sri Rama Naama (or)
Hare Rama-Hare Krishna Manthra; (or)
Nama Thraya Japa (Achyuta-Ananta-Govinda); (or)
Sri Raghavendra Ashtaakshari during Eclipse.

Praying Sri Guru Raayaru during Eclipse time is specifically prescribed;

Whenever there is a lunar or solar eclipse or during Pushya Star occurring on Sunday (Pushya-Arka Yoga), any person reciting Sri Raaghavendra Stothra 108 times with all sincerity and devotion will not have trouble from ghosts/devils and no evil befall on him.

Sri Appanaachaarya an ardent devotee and prime disciple of Sri Guru Raayaru in his famous hymn on Guru Raaghavendra (Sri Raaghavednra Stothra) emphasizes as follows....

Soma-Sooryo paraage cha pushyaarkaadi samaagame,
Yo anuthamam idham stotramashtothara satham japeth,
Bootha pretha pisachaadi peeda thasya na jaayathe

★★★★★ PITHRU THARAPANA SANKALPA SLOKA ★★★★★
(Current Solar Eclipse specific)

Sri Govinda - Govinda! Sri MahaVishnorAagnaaya,
Pravarthamanasya, Aadya Bramhane, Dwiteeya Parardhe,
Sri Swetha Varaaha Kalpe, Vaivaswatha Manvanthare, Kaliyuge,
Kali Prathama Charane, Bauddhavathare, Salivaahanasakhe,
Jambudweepe, Meror Dakshina bhage, Bharathavarshe,
Bharatha Khande, Godavari Dakshina theere……Sannidhau,

Asmin Varthamane, Vyavahaarike, Chaandramanena,
Sri Manmathanaama Sanvatsare, Uttaraayane, Shirsira Ruthau,
Maagha Maase, Krishna Pakshe, Amaavaasyayaam…
Soumya Vaasare, Vishnu Nakshatre, Vishnu Yoge,
Vishnu Karane;

evam guna visheshana visistaayaam; Punya thithau;

Praacheenavithi (Yagnopaveetham in apasavya position)

Samastha Pitrantharyaami…
Sri MadhvaVallabha SriMadhJanardhana Vaasudevah Preranaaya
Sri MadhvaVallabha SriMadhJanardhana Vaasudevah Preethyartham

Asmath Samastha Pithrunaam
Akshaya Punya Lokaavaapthyartham
Suryoparaaga Punyakaaley; Sraaddhaanga
Saddhyah Thila Tharpanam Karishye

After giving Thila Tharpana…

Samarpana sloka

Yasya smrithya cha naamokthyaa thapoyajnaa kriyadhishu
nyunam sampoornathaam yaathi sadhyo vande thamachyutham
manthraheenam kriyaheenam bhakthiheenam Janaardhana
yathkrutham thu mayaa deva paripoornam thadhasthu mey

Anena Mayaa - Suryoparaaga Kruthena
Samastha Pithru Thila Tharpanena
Samastha Pithrantharyaami Sri MadhvaVallabha
SriMadhJanardhana Vaasudevah
Priyathaam Supreetho Varado Bhavathu
Sri Krishnaarpanamasthu

Kaayena vaacha manasendri yairvaa
Buddhyaatmanaa vaa prakrite swabhavath
Karomi yadyat sakalam parasmai
Naarayanayethi samarpayaami

★★★★★★★★ GRAHANA DOSHA PARIHARA ★★★★★★★★

Since eclipse is occurring in the constellation of Poorvabhadra Nakshathra (Kumbha Raasi), those who are born in the constellation of Poorvabhadra may have to perform Grahana Shanti.

Those born in the Moon sign of Kumbha Raasi (Aquarius) and in the constellation of Poorvabhadra in particular should donate the following to a Brahmin along with Dakshine.

One Bronze/Copper plate (filled with ghee) +
Suvarna (Gold) Surya Bimba & Naga Bimba +
Vasthra (Clothes) along with

Wheat (Sun)
Horse Gram (whole grain) (Kethu); +
Black Thila

Sankalpa sloka while giving charity (Bimba Daana)
------------------------------------------------------------
Suryagrahaantaryaami Sri Bharatheeramana Mukhyapraanaanthargatha Sri Lakshminaarasimha preranaaya
Sri Lakshminaarasimha preethyartham
Suryoparaaga-peeda-parihaaraartham
Sanaaga Suryabimba-daanamaham karishye

Any Eclipse time is sacred and the entire period of Eclipse is known as Parva Kala (most sacred time).

Any sacred rituals or rites performed during Parvakaala will derive more merits than those performed during ordinary times.

Hence, don’t waste the Eclipse time with materialistic pursuits and activities.


https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-Qg77kFyGfho/VuOVcvfzNqI/AAAAAAAAjM4/9jhUdNwYggs/w506-h750/2016%2B-%2B1
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https://plus.google.com/116192361124024978313 SANJAY BALE : An Eclliptical Sunset This is the view from the hill just above "The Wave" looking north out over the...
An Eclliptical Sunset

This is the view from the hill just above "The Wave" looking north out over the valley.

This is during the Annular eclipse so we got sunset a bit earlier than day... it was a little eerie to see sunset like colors and lighting so early in the evening.

I figured this scene might be a one of a kind shot to get sunset on this valley because usually the mountain blocks the sunset colors from ever hitting this valley.

Technically this is a couple minutes after the perfectly centered eclipse.
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