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Most recent 20 results returned for keyword: TIME Magazine (Search this on MAP)

https://plus.google.com/112212261947133136537 Tim Loughran Dentistry : #Fact: Time Magazine did a survey and found 59% of Americans would rather have a dental appointment ...
#Fact: Time Magazine did a survey and found 59% of Americans would rather have a dental appointment than be sitting next to someone talking on a cell phone.

Would you choose a dental appointment over a noisy cell phone conversation?
14 minutes ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/115620475497174781785 Mona Bernhardt-Lörinczi : The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912 This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic...
The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912

This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic on the surface of the ocean. It was taken during the maiden voyage—the only voyage— at Crosshaven, Ireland just after the vessel departed Queenstown,  the town now known as Cobh, Ireland. The ship stopped at Queenstown before embarking on its planned final destination, New York.

The photo was taken on April 12, 1912. Three days after this photo was taken the Titanic would collide with an iceberg, with over 1,500 on board perishing in the tragedy including the ship’s captain. The Titanic is one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history.

According to Time Magazine, Irish Jesuit priest Francis Browne is the photographer. Browne sailed with the ship for the first leg of its journey, from Southampton, England to Queenstown. The priest would have stayed for the remainder of the transatlantic journey too, having received an offer of a ticket from a wealthy family he befriended while on board. When Browne reached Cobh, however, he received a note from his clerical superior, ordering him to return to his station immediately rather than sail on with Titanic.

The Titanic was considered practically “unsinkable” because it was designed to stay afloat in the event the hull was pierced and internal flooding occurred. The design was based on the division of the hull into 15 transverse watertight bulkheads with each one incorporating watertight doors. The doors could be closed automatically in the event of an accident.

The compartments formed by the watertight bulkheads, however, were not independently watertight. This was a major oversight. If water filled a compartment higher than the top of a watertight bulkhead, then the adjoining compartments would flood. The design team assumed that this situation was impossible since all bulkheads rose to a level above the waterline.

It was strongly believed that when the Titanic hit the iceberg, a 350 foot gash was torn in the starboard side of the forward hull. The huge gash in the bow allowed water to infiltrate the ship and cause six of the sixteen watertight compartments to flood. The Titanic was designed to stay afloat if three or possibly four compartments flooded. As the sea rose above the watertight bulkheads, adjoining compartments filled with water (a simple way to conceptualize how Titanic flooded is to think of what happens when you fill an ice cube tray with water). The added water weight pulled Titanic’s bow deeper into the ocean until the great ship could not hold longer, and finally sank.

While the majority of those on board the Titanic did not survive the disaster, about 700 of the 2,200 passengers did. One survivor was a woman named Eva Hart. Hart was seven years old during the tragedy and lost her father; however, she went on to live her life with a positive outlook.

Here is a quote from Eva Hart, provided by Biography.com (http://www.biography.com/news/titanics-100th-anniversary-6-survivor-stories-20799733 ):

“People I meet always seem surprised that I do not hesitate to travel by train, car, airplane or ship when necessary. It is almost as if they expect me to be permanently quivering in my shoes at the thought of a journey. If I acted like that I would have died of fright many years ago—life has to be lived irrespective of the possible dangers and tragedies lurking round the corner.”

#Titanic #historicpictoric #history #historic #historical  #oldisgold #historical_photos #historicpictoric #historicphotos   #Dynamophone #history #historic #blackandwhite #blackandwhitephotos #blackandwhitephotography  
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-nx5PqBiMlrI/U9kz-8K45hI/AAAAAAAAAsA/BBvytaQEWIQ/w506-h750/The%2Blast%2Bpicture%2Bof%2BTitanic%2Btaken%2Bbefore%2Bsinking%252C%2B1912.jpg
20 minutes ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/116758905315384161466 Nahason Bastin : The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912 This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic...
The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912

This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic on the surface of the ocean. It was taken during the maiden voyage—the only voyage— at Crosshaven, Ireland just after the vessel departed Queenstown,  the town now known as Cobh, Ireland. The ship stopped at Queenstown before embarking on its planned final destination, New York.

The photo was taken on April 12, 1912. Three days after this photo was taken the Titanic would collide with an iceberg, with over 1,500 on board perishing in the tragedy including the ship’s captain. The Titanic is one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history.

According to Time Magazine, Irish Jesuit priest Francis Browne is the photographer. Browne sailed with the ship for the first leg of its journey, from Southampton, England to Queenstown. The priest would have stayed for the remainder of the transatlantic journey too, having received an offer of a ticket from a wealthy family he befriended while on board. When Browne reached Cobh, however, he received a note from his clerical superior, ordering him to return to his station immediately rather than sail on with Titanic.

The Titanic was considered practically “unsinkable” because it was designed to stay afloat in the event the hull was pierced and internal flooding occurred. The design was based on the division of the hull into 15 transverse watertight bulkheads with each one incorporating watertight doors. The doors could be closed automatically in the event of an accident.

The compartments formed by the watertight bulkheads, however, were not independently watertight. This was a major oversight. If water filled a compartment higher than the top of a watertight bulkhead, then the adjoining compartments would flood. The design team assumed that this situation was impossible since all bulkheads rose to a level above the waterline.

It was strongly believed that when the Titanic hit the iceberg, a 350 foot gash was torn in the starboard side of the forward hull. The huge gash in the bow allowed water to infiltrate the ship and cause six of the sixteen watertight compartments to flood. The Titanic was designed to stay afloat if three or possibly four compartments flooded. As the sea rose above the watertight bulkheads, adjoining compartments filled with water (a simple way to conceptualize how Titanic flooded is to think of what happens when you fill an ice cube tray with water). The added water weight pulled Titanic’s bow deeper into the ocean until the great ship could not hold longer, and finally sank.

While the majority of those on board the Titanic did not survive the disaster, about 700 of the 2,200 passengers did. One survivor was a woman named Eva Hart. Hart was seven years old during the tragedy and lost her father; however, she went on to live her life with a positive outlook.

Here is a quote from Eva Hart, provided by Biography.com (http://www.biography.com/news/titanics-100th-anniversary-6-survivor-stories-20799733 ):

“People I meet always seem surprised that I do not hesitate to travel by train, car, airplane or ship when necessary. It is almost as if they expect me to be permanently quivering in my shoes at the thought of a journey. If I acted like that I would have died of fright many years ago—life has to be lived irrespective of the possible dangers and tragedies lurking round the corner.”

#Titanic #historicpictoric #history #historic #historical  #oldisgold #historical_photos #historicpictoric #historicphotos   #Dynamophone #history #historic #blackandwhite #blackandwhitephotos #blackandwhitephotography  
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-nx5PqBiMlrI/U9kz-8K45hI/AAAAAAAAAsA/BBvytaQEWIQ/w506-h750/The%2Blast%2Bpicture%2Bof%2BTitanic%2Btaken%2Bbefore%2Bsinking%252C%2B1912.jpg
49 minutes ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/109219825609507975285 Vera Moraes : A Time Magazine Invention of the Year (2012) winner, the LifeStraw removes a minimum of 99.9999% of ...
A Time Magazine Invention of the Year (2012) winner, the LifeStraw removes a minimum of 99.9999% of waterborne bacteria and filters up to 1000L of contaminated water.

Around the world, an estimated 884 million people still do not have access to clean drinking water. According to the manufacturers, LifeStraw makes it possible to drink safely from any river, lake or puddle. It is also perfect for the backpacker, camper, hiker, traveler, boy scout, or for emergencies.
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-mmrCyOKpYck/Uwc07cAltcI/AAAAAAAAgdM/XZg6WGnfZWQ/w506-h750/1964983_648626135191104_1270108337_n.jpg
52 minutes ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/111946872851886383229 Quintiles : Dr. Kimberley Blackwell, one of Time Magazine's 100 Most Influential People of 2013, will judge the ...
Dr. Kimberley Blackwell, one of Time Magazine's 100 Most Influential People of 2013, will judge the finalists for our oncology research grant. Learn more and apply today: http://bit.ly/1o84zFg
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-T5SZvd-QC8g/U9o20D2hW1I/AAAAAAAAC24/X2TvWk8wIHk/w506-h750/7393f8fa-8a69-461c-b10b-51c08ea6fdeb
59 minutes ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/116777427005898553449 Kathleen Kelly : The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912 This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic...
The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912

This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic on the surface of the ocean. It was taken during the maiden voyage—the only voyage— at Crosshaven, Ireland just after the vessel departed Queenstown,  the town now known as Cobh, Ireland. The ship stopped at Queenstown before embarking on its planned final destination, New York.

The photo was taken on April 12, 1912. Three days after this photo was taken the Titanic would collide with an iceberg, with over 1,500 on board perishing in the tragedy including the ship’s captain. The Titanic is one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history.

According to Time Magazine, Irish Jesuit priest Francis Browne is the photographer. Browne sailed with the ship for the first leg of its journey, from Southampton, England to Queenstown. The priest would have stayed for the remainder of the transatlantic journey too, having received an offer of a ticket from a wealthy family he befriended while on board. When Browne reached Cobh, however, he received a note from his clerical superior, ordering him to return to his station immediately rather than sail on with Titanic.

The Titanic was considered practically “unsinkable” because it was designed to stay afloat in the event the hull was pierced and internal flooding occurred. The design was based on the division of the hull into 15 transverse watertight bulkheads with each one incorporating watertight doors. The doors could be closed automatically in the event of an accident.

The compartments formed by the watertight bulkheads, however, were not independently watertight. This was a major oversight. If water filled a compartment higher than the top of a watertight bulkhead, then the adjoining compartments would flood. The design team assumed that this situation was impossible since all bulkheads rose to a level above the waterline.

It was strongly believed that when the Titanic hit the iceberg, a 350 foot gash was torn in the starboard side of the forward hull. The huge gash in the bow allowed water to infiltrate the ship and cause six of the sixteen watertight compartments to flood. The Titanic was designed to stay afloat if three or possibly four compartments flooded. As the sea rose above the watertight bulkheads, adjoining compartments filled with water (a simple way to conceptualize how Titanic flooded is to think of what happens when you fill an ice cube tray with water). The added water weight pulled Titanic’s bow deeper into the ocean until the great ship could not hold longer, and finally sank.

While the majority of those on board the Titanic did not survive the disaster, about 700 of the 2,200 passengers did. One survivor was a woman named Eva Hart. Hart was seven years old during the tragedy and lost her father; however, she went on to live her life with a positive outlook.

Here is a quote from Eva Hart, provided by Biography.com (http://www.biography.com/news/titanics-100th-anniversary-6-survivor-stories-20799733 ):

“People I meet always seem surprised that I do not hesitate to travel by train, car, airplane or ship when necessary. It is almost as if they expect me to be permanently quivering in my shoes at the thought of a journey. If I acted like that I would have died of fright many years ago—life has to be lived irrespective of the possible dangers and tragedies lurking round the corner.”

#Titanic #historicpictoric #history #historic #historical  #oldisgold #historical_photos #historicpictoric #historicphotos   #Dynamophone #history #historic #blackandwhite #blackandwhitephotos #blackandwhitephotography  
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-nx5PqBiMlrI/U9kz-8K45hI/AAAAAAAAAsA/BBvytaQEWIQ/w506-h750/The%2Blast%2Bpicture%2Bof%2BTitanic%2Btaken%2Bbefore%2Bsinking%252C%2B1912.jpg
1 hour ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/118312375433721678018 Jack Lea : The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912 This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic...
The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912

This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic on the surface of the ocean. It was taken during the maiden voyage—the only voyage— at Crosshaven, Ireland just after the vessel departed Queenstown,  the town now known as Cobh, Ireland. The ship stopped at Queenstown before embarking on its planned final destination, New York.

The photo was taken on April 12, 1912. Three days after this photo was taken the Titanic would collide with an iceberg, with over 1,500 on board perishing in the tragedy including the ship’s captain. The Titanic is one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history.

According to Time Magazine, Irish Jesuit priest Francis Browne is the photographer. Browne sailed with the ship for the first leg of its journey, from Southampton, England to Queenstown. The priest would have stayed for the remainder of the transatlantic journey too, having received an offer of a ticket from a wealthy family he befriended while on board. When Browne reached Cobh, however, he received a note from his clerical superior, ordering him to return to his station immediately rather than sail on with Titanic.

The Titanic was considered practically “unsinkable” because it was designed to stay afloat in the event the hull was pierced and internal flooding occurred. The design was based on the division of the hull into 15 transverse watertight bulkheads with each one incorporating watertight doors. The doors could be closed automatically in the event of an accident.

The compartments formed by the watertight bulkheads, however, were not independently watertight. This was a major oversight. If water filled a compartment higher than the top of a watertight bulkhead, then the adjoining compartments would flood. The design team assumed that this situation was impossible since all bulkheads rose to a level above the waterline.

It was strongly believed that when the Titanic hit the iceberg, a 350 foot gash was torn in the starboard side of the forward hull. The huge gash in the bow allowed water to infiltrate the ship and cause six of the sixteen watertight compartments to flood. The Titanic was designed to stay afloat if three or possibly four compartments flooded. As the sea rose above the watertight bulkheads, adjoining compartments filled with water (a simple way to conceptualize how Titanic flooded is to think of what happens when you fill an ice cube tray with water). The added water weight pulled Titanic’s bow deeper into the ocean until the great ship could not hold longer, and finally sank.

While the majority of those on board the Titanic did not survive the disaster, about 700 of the 2,200 passengers did. One survivor was a woman named Eva Hart. Hart was seven years old during the tragedy and lost her father; however, she went on to live her life with a positive outlook.

Here is a quote from Eva Hart, provided by Biography.com (http://www.biography.com/news/titanics-100th-anniversary-6-survivor-stories-20799733 ):

“People I meet always seem surprised that I do not hesitate to travel by train, car, airplane or ship when necessary. It is almost as if they expect me to be permanently quivering in my shoes at the thought of a journey. If I acted like that I would have died of fright many years ago—life has to be lived irrespective of the possible dangers and tragedies lurking round the corner.”

#Titanic #historicpictoric #history #historic #historical  #oldisgold #historical_photos #historicpictoric #historicphotos   #Dynamophone #history #historic #blackandwhite #blackandwhitephotos #blackandwhitephotography  
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-nx5PqBiMlrI/U9kz-8K45hI/AAAAAAAAAsA/BBvytaQEWIQ/w506-h750/The%2Blast%2Bpicture%2Bof%2BTitanic%2Btaken%2Bbefore%2Bsinking%252C%2B1912.jpg
1 hour ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/109877189635125716338 Marcello Giovanni Papa : The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912 This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic...
The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912

This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic on the surface of the ocean. It was taken during the maiden voyage—the only voyage— at Crosshaven, Ireland just after the vessel departed Queenstown,  the town now known as Cobh, Ireland. The ship stopped at Queenstown before embarking on its planned final destination, New York.

The photo was taken on April 12, 1912. Three days after this photo was taken the Titanic would collide with an iceberg, with over 1,500 on board perishing in the tragedy including the ship’s captain. The Titanic is one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history.

According to Time Magazine, Irish Jesuit priest Francis Browne is the photographer. Browne sailed with the ship for the first leg of its journey, from Southampton, England to Queenstown. The priest would have stayed for the remainder of the transatlantic journey too, having received an offer of a ticket from a wealthy family he befriended while on board. When Browne reached Cobh, however, he received a note from his clerical superior, ordering him to return to his station immediately rather than sail on with Titanic.

The Titanic was considered practically “unsinkable” because it was designed to stay afloat in the event the hull was pierced and internal flooding occurred. The design was based on the division of the hull into 15 transverse watertight bulkheads with each one incorporating watertight doors. The doors could be closed automatically in the event of an accident.

The compartments formed by the watertight bulkheads, however, were not independently watertight. This was a major oversight. If water filled a compartment higher than the top of a watertight bulkhead, then the adjoining compartments would flood. The design team assumed that this situation was impossible since all bulkheads rose to a level above the waterline.

It was strongly believed that when the Titanic hit the iceberg, a 350 foot gash was torn in the starboard side of the forward hull. The huge gash in the bow allowed water to infiltrate the ship and cause six of the sixteen watertight compartments to flood. The Titanic was designed to stay afloat if three or possibly four compartments flooded. As the sea rose above the watertight bulkheads, adjoining compartments filled with water (a simple way to conceptualize how Titanic flooded is to think of what happens when you fill an ice cube tray with water). The added water weight pulled Titanic’s bow deeper into the ocean until the great ship could not hold longer, and finally sank.

While the majority of those on board the Titanic did not survive the disaster, about 700 of the 2,200 passengers did. One survivor was a woman named Eva Hart. Hart was seven years old during the tragedy and lost her father; however, she went on to live her life with a positive outlook.

Here is a quote from Eva Hart, provided by Biography.com (http://www.biography.com/news/titanics-100th-anniversary-6-survivor-stories-20799733 ):

“People I meet always seem surprised that I do not hesitate to travel by train, car, airplane or ship when necessary. It is almost as if they expect me to be permanently quivering in my shoes at the thought of a journey. If I acted like that I would have died of fright many years ago—life has to be lived irrespective of the possible dangers and tragedies lurking round the corner.”

#Titanic #historicpictoric #history #historic #historical  #oldisgold #historical_photos #historicpictoric #historicphotos   #Dynamophone #history #historic #blackandwhite #blackandwhitephotos #blackandwhitephotography  
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-nx5PqBiMlrI/U9kz-8K45hI/AAAAAAAAAsA/BBvytaQEWIQ/w506-h750/The%2Blast%2Bpicture%2Bof%2BTitanic%2Btaken%2Bbefore%2Bsinking%252C%2B1912.jpg
1 hour ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/112453750470095767453 Richard Price Elliott : " Time Magazine called it one of the 50 worst inventions while others have compared it to body modifications...
" Time Magazine called it one of the 50 worst inventions while others have compared it to body modifications and plastic surgery. "    ... #1guy2be  simply calls it a crutch.  
How An Oil Engineer Discovered Auto-Tune And Changed The Music Industry Forever
Before inventing Auto-Tune, the software that...
1 hour ago - Via Community - View -
https://plus.google.com/104602142436256695273 David McQuilliam : The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912 This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic...
The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912

This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic on the surface of the ocean. It was taken during the maiden voyage—the only voyage— at Crosshaven, Ireland just after the vessel departed Queenstown,  the town now known as Cobh, Ireland. The ship stopped at Queenstown before embarking on its planned final destination, New York.

The photo was taken on April 12, 1912. Three days after this photo was taken the Titanic would collide with an iceberg, with over 1,500 on board perishing in the tragedy including the ship’s captain. The Titanic is one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history.

According to Time Magazine, Irish Jesuit priest Francis Browne is the photographer. Browne sailed with the ship for the first leg of its journey, from Southampton, England to Queenstown. The priest would have stayed for the remainder of the transatlantic journey too, having received an offer of a ticket from a wealthy family he befriended while on board. When Browne reached Cobh, however, he received a note from his clerical superior, ordering him to return to his station immediately rather than sail on with Titanic.

The Titanic was considered practically “unsinkable” because it was designed to stay afloat in the event the hull was pierced and internal flooding occurred. The design was based on the division of the hull into 15 transverse watertight bulkheads with each one incorporating watertight doors. The doors could be closed automatically in the event of an accident.

The compartments formed by the watertight bulkheads, however, were not independently watertight. This was a major oversight. If water filled a compartment higher than the top of a watertight bulkhead, then the adjoining compartments would flood. The design team assumed that this situation was impossible since all bulkheads rose to a level above the waterline.

It was strongly believed that when the Titanic hit the iceberg, a 350 foot gash was torn in the starboard side of the forward hull. The huge gash in the bow allowed water to infiltrate the ship and cause six of the sixteen watertight compartments to flood. The Titanic was designed to stay afloat if three or possibly four compartments flooded. As the sea rose above the watertight bulkheads, adjoining compartments filled with water (a simple way to conceptualize how Titanic flooded is to think of what happens when you fill an ice cube tray with water). The added water weight pulled Titanic’s bow deeper into the ocean until the great ship could not hold longer, and finally sank.

While the majority of those on board the Titanic did not survive the disaster, about 700 of the 2,200 passengers did. One survivor was a woman named Eva Hart. Hart was seven years old during the tragedy and lost her father; however, she went on to live her life with a positive outlook.

Here is a quote from Eva Hart, provided by Biography.com (http://www.biography.com/news/titanics-100th-anniversary-6-survivor-stories-20799733 ):

“People I meet always seem surprised that I do not hesitate to travel by train, car, airplane or ship when necessary. It is almost as if they expect me to be permanently quivering in my shoes at the thought of a journey. If I acted like that I would have died of fright many years ago—life has to be lived irrespective of the possible dangers and tragedies lurking round the corner.”

#Titanic #historicpictoric #history #historic #historical  #oldisgold #historical_photos #historicpictoric #historicphotos   #Dynamophone #history #historic #blackandwhite #blackandwhitephotos #blackandwhitephotography  
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-nx5PqBiMlrI/U9kz-8K45hI/AAAAAAAAAsA/BBvytaQEWIQ/w506-h750/The%2Blast%2Bpicture%2Bof%2BTitanic%2Btaken%2Bbefore%2Bsinking%252C%2B1912.jpg
2 hours ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/115470427574452692603 Jack Goodwind : The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912 This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic...
The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912

This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic on the surface of the ocean. It was taken during the maiden voyage—the only voyage— at Crosshaven, Ireland just after the vessel departed Queenstown,  the town now known as Cobh, Ireland. The ship stopped at Queenstown before embarking on its planned final destination, New York.

The photo was taken on April 12, 1912. Three days after this photo was taken the Titanic would collide with an iceberg, with over 1,500 on board perishing in the tragedy including the ship’s captain. The Titanic is one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history.

According to Time Magazine, Irish Jesuit priest Francis Browne is the photographer. Browne sailed with the ship for the first leg of its journey, from Southampton, England to Queenstown. The priest would have stayed for the remainder of the transatlantic journey too, having received an offer of a ticket from a wealthy family he befriended while on board. When Browne reached Cobh, however, he received a note from his clerical superior, ordering him to return to his station immediately rather than sail on with Titanic.

The Titanic was considered practically “unsinkable” because it was designed to stay afloat in the event the hull was pierced and internal flooding occurred. The design was based on the division of the hull into 15 transverse watertight bulkheads with each one incorporating watertight doors. The doors could be closed automatically in the event of an accident.

The compartments formed by the watertight bulkheads, however, were not independently watertight. This was a major oversight. If water filled a compartment higher than the top of a watertight bulkhead, then the adjoining compartments would flood. The design team assumed that this situation was impossible since all bulkheads rose to a level above the waterline.

It was strongly believed that when the Titanic hit the iceberg, a 350 foot gash was torn in the starboard side of the forward hull. The huge gash in the bow allowed water to infiltrate the ship and cause six of the sixteen watertight compartments to flood. The Titanic was designed to stay afloat if three or possibly four compartments flooded. As the sea rose above the watertight bulkheads, adjoining compartments filled with water (a simple way to conceptualize how Titanic flooded is to think of what happens when you fill an ice cube tray with water). The added water weight pulled Titanic’s bow deeper into the ocean until the great ship could not hold longer, and finally sank.

While the majority of those on board the Titanic did not survive the disaster, about 700 of the 2,200 passengers did. One survivor was a woman named Eva Hart. Hart was seven years old during the tragedy and lost her father; however, she went on to live her life with a positive outlook.

Here is a quote from Eva Hart, provided by Biography.com (http://www.biography.com/news/titanics-100th-anniversary-6-survivor-stories-20799733 ):

“People I meet always seem surprised that I do not hesitate to travel by train, car, airplane or ship when necessary. It is almost as if they expect me to be permanently quivering in my shoes at the thought of a journey. If I acted like that I would have died of fright many years ago—life has to be lived irrespective of the possible dangers and tragedies lurking round the corner.”

#Titanic #historicpictoric #history #historic #historical  #oldisgold #historical_photos #historicpictoric #historicphotos   #Dynamophone #history #historic #blackandwhite #blackandwhitephotos #blackandwhitephotography  
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-nx5PqBiMlrI/U9kz-8K45hI/AAAAAAAAAsA/BBvytaQEWIQ/w506-h750/The%2Blast%2Bpicture%2Bof%2BTitanic%2Btaken%2Bbefore%2Bsinking%252C%2B1912.jpg
2 hours ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/105037717879582839060 Jim Griffin : The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912 This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic...
The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912

This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic on the surface of the ocean. It was taken during the maiden voyage—the only voyage— at Crosshaven, Ireland just after the vessel departed Queenstown,  the town now known as Cobh, Ireland. The ship stopped at Queenstown before embarking on its planned final destination, New York.

The photo was taken on April 12, 1912. Three days after this photo was taken the Titanic would collide with an iceberg, with over 1,500 on board perishing in the tragedy including the ship’s captain. The Titanic is one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history.

According to Time Magazine, Irish Jesuit priest Francis Browne is the photographer. Browne sailed with the ship for the first leg of its journey, from Southampton, England to Queenstown. The priest would have stayed for the remainder of the transatlantic journey too, having received an offer of a ticket from a wealthy family he befriended while on board. When Browne reached Cobh, however, he received a note from his clerical superior, ordering him to return to his station immediately rather than sail on with Titanic.

The Titanic was considered practically “unsinkable” because it was designed to stay afloat in the event the hull was pierced and internal flooding occurred. The design was based on the division of the hull into 15 transverse watertight bulkheads with each one incorporating watertight doors. The doors could be closed automatically in the event of an accident.

The compartments formed by the watertight bulkheads, however, were not independently watertight. This was a major oversight. If water filled a compartment higher than the top of a watertight bulkhead, then the adjoining compartments would flood. The design team assumed that this situation was impossible since all bulkheads rose to a level above the waterline.

It was strongly believed that when the Titanic hit the iceberg, a 350 foot gash was torn in the starboard side of the forward hull. The huge gash in the bow allowed water to infiltrate the ship and cause six of the sixteen watertight compartments to flood. The Titanic was designed to stay afloat if three or possibly four compartments flooded. As the sea rose above the watertight bulkheads, adjoining compartments filled with water (a simple way to conceptualize how Titanic flooded is to think of what happens when you fill an ice cube tray with water). The added water weight pulled Titanic’s bow deeper into the ocean until the great ship could not hold longer, and finally sank.

While the majority of those on board the Titanic did not survive the disaster, about 700 of the 2,200 passengers did. One survivor was a woman named Eva Hart. Hart was seven years old during the tragedy and lost her father; however, she went on to live her life with a positive outlook.

Here is a quote from Eva Hart, provided by Biography.com (http://www.biography.com/news/titanics-100th-anniversary-6-survivor-stories-20799733 ):

“People I meet always seem surprised that I do not hesitate to travel by train, car, airplane or ship when necessary. It is almost as if they expect me to be permanently quivering in my shoes at the thought of a journey. If I acted like that I would have died of fright many years ago—life has to be lived irrespective of the possible dangers and tragedies lurking round the corner.”

#Titanic #historicpictoric #history #historic #historical  #oldisgold #historical_photos #historicpictoric #historicphotos   #Dynamophone #history #historic #blackandwhite #blackandwhitephotos #blackandwhitephotography  
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https://plus.google.com/110049799931507697986 The Kahimyang Project : On August 1, 2009, Ma. Corazon Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino, the first woman President of the Philippines...
On August 1, 2009, Ma. Corazon Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino, the first woman President of the Philippines, died of colon cancer at the age of 76.

Born in Manila, "Tita Cory," as she was fondly called, was the mother of the country's 15th and current President, Benigno Simeon "Noynoy" Aquino III. She is best remembered for leading the 1986 EDSA People Power Revolution which toppled the authoritarian regime of President Ferdinand Marcos and restored democracy in the Philippines.

Notably, she was revered by many Filipinos as the Philippines' "Icon of Democracy". She was also hailed by TIME Magazine as the "Saint of Democracy", due to her well-known spiritual life and strong adherence to non-violence and democracy.

Prior to her post as president, Cory was known as the self-proclaimed "plain housewife" of the Senator Benigno S. Aquino Jr., the popular opposition leader and staunchest critic of the Marcos administration, who was assassinated on August 21, 1983 upon returning to the Philippines after his three-year self-exile in the United States.

This tragic event united the fragmented opposition leaders against the authoritarian Marcos regime, hence they called for widowed Cory to enter into the political arena against Marcos in the February 1986 snap election.

After 20 years in Malacanang, Marcos was driven out from power and Cory was formally and peacefully sworn on February 25, 1986 as the new president, a historic event which is now known and remembered as the 1986 EDSA People Power Revolution.

She finished her term in June 1992 and returned to private life, although she remained active in the public eye, constantly voicing her views and opinions on pressing political issues in the country.
Corazon Aquino died of colon cancer August 1, 2009
Casket of late former President Corazon Aquino passes by EDSA on August 3, 2009 (Credit: militaryphotos.net). On August 1, 2009, Ma. Corazon Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino, the first woman President of the Philippines, died of colon cancer at the age of 76. Born in Manila, "Tita Cory," as she was fondly called, was the mother of the country's 15th and current President, Benigno Simeon "Noynoy" Aquino III. She is best remembered for leading the 1986 E...
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https://plus.google.com/109405606554868892754 Primo Esteria : On August 1, 2009, Ma. Corazon Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino, the first woman President of the Philippines...
On August 1, 2009, Ma. Corazon Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino, the first woman President of the Philippines, died of colon cancer at the age of 76.

Born in Manila, "Tita Cory," as she was fondly called, was the mother of the country's 15th and current President, Benigno Simeon "Noynoy" Aquino III. She is best remembered for leading the 1986 EDSA People Power Revolution which toppled the authoritarian regime of President Ferdinand Marcos and restored democracy in the Philippines.

Notably, she was revered by many Filipinos as the Philippines' "Icon of Democracy". She was also hailed by TIME Magazine as the "Saint of Democracy", due to her well-known spiritual life and strong adherence to non-violence and democracy.

Prior to her post as president, Cory was known as the self-proclaimed "plain housewife" of the Senator Benigno S. Aquino Jr., the popular opposition leader and staunchest critic of the Marcos administration, who was assassinated on August 21, 1983 upon returning to the Philippines after his three-year self-exile in the United States.

This tragic event united the fragmented opposition leaders against the authoritarian Marcos regime, hence they called for widowed Cory to enter into the political arena against Marcos in the February 1986 snap election.

After 20 years in Malacanang, Marcos was driven out from power and Cory was formally and peacefully sworn on February 25, 1986 as the new president, a historic event which is now known and remembered as the 1986 EDSA People Power Revolution.

She finished her term in June 1992 and returned to private life, although she remained active in the public eye, constantly voicing her views and opinions on pressing political issues in the country.
Corazon Aquino died of colon cancer August 1, 2009
Casket of late former President Corazon Aquino passes by EDSA on August 3, 2009 (Credit: militaryphotos.net). On August 1, 2009, Ma. Corazon Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino, the first woman President of the Philippines, died of colon cancer at the age of 76. Born in Manila, "Tita Cory," as she was fondly called, was the mother of the country's 15th and current President, Benigno Simeon "Noynoy" Aquino III. She is best remembered for leading the 1986 E...
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https://plus.google.com/100358572715899994016 Vivian Coca : The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912 This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic...
The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912

This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic on the surface of the ocean. It was taken during the maiden voyage—the only voyage— at Crosshaven, Ireland just after the vessel departed Queenstown,  the town now known as Cobh, Ireland. The ship stopped at Queenstown before embarking on its planned final destination, New York.

The photo was taken on April 12, 1912. Three days after this photo was taken the Titanic would collide with an iceberg, with over 1,500 on board perishing in the tragedy including the ship’s captain. The Titanic is one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history.

According to Time Magazine, Irish Jesuit priest Francis Browne is the photographer. Browne sailed with the ship for the first leg of its journey, from Southampton, England to Queenstown. The priest would have stayed for the remainder of the transatlantic journey too, having received an offer of a ticket from a wealthy family he befriended while on board. When Browne reached Cobh, however, he received a note from his clerical superior, ordering him to return to his station immediately rather than sail on with Titanic.

The Titanic was considered practically “unsinkable” because it was designed to stay afloat in the event the hull was pierced and internal flooding occurred. The design was based on the division of the hull into 15 transverse watertight bulkheads with each one incorporating watertight doors. The doors could be closed automatically in the event of an accident.

The compartments formed by the watertight bulkheads, however, were not independently watertight. This was a major oversight. If water filled a compartment higher than the top of a watertight bulkhead, then the adjoining compartments would flood. The design team assumed that this situation was impossible since all bulkheads rose to a level above the waterline.

It was strongly believed that when the Titanic hit the iceberg, a 350 foot gash was torn in the starboard side of the forward hull. The huge gash in the bow allowed water to infiltrate the ship and cause six of the sixteen watertight compartments to flood. The Titanic was designed to stay afloat if three or possibly four compartments flooded. As the sea rose above the watertight bulkheads, adjoining compartments filled with water (a simple way to conceptualize how Titanic flooded is to think of what happens when you fill an ice cube tray with water). The added water weight pulled Titanic’s bow deeper into the ocean until the great ship could not hold longer, and finally sank.

While the majority of those on board the Titanic did not survive the disaster, about 700 of the 2,200 passengers did. One survivor was a woman named Eva Hart. Hart was seven years old during the tragedy and lost her father; however, she went on to live her life with a positive outlook.

Here is a quote from Eva Hart, provided by Biography.com (http://www.biography.com/news/titanics-100th-anniversary-6-survivor-stories-20799733 ):

“People I meet always seem surprised that I do not hesitate to travel by train, car, airplane or ship when necessary. It is almost as if they expect me to be permanently quivering in my shoes at the thought of a journey. If I acted like that I would have died of fright many years ago—life has to be lived irrespective of the possible dangers and tragedies lurking round the corner.”

#Titanic #historicpictoric #history #historic #historical  #oldisgold #historical_photos #historicpictoric #historicphotos   #Dynamophone #history #historic #blackandwhite #blackandwhitephotos #blackandwhitephotography  
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-nx5PqBiMlrI/U9kz-8K45hI/AAAAAAAAAsA/BBvytaQEWIQ/w506-h750/The%2Blast%2Bpicture%2Bof%2BTitanic%2Btaken%2Bbefore%2Bsinking%252C%2B1912.jpg
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https://plus.google.com/105504569814616280147 Priya Satiaceelan : The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912 This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic...
The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912

This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic on the surface of the ocean. It was taken during the maiden voyage—the only voyage— at Crosshaven, Ireland just after the vessel departed Queenstown,  the town now known as Cobh, Ireland. The ship stopped at Queenstown before embarking on its planned final destination, New York.

The photo was taken on April 12, 1912. Three days after this photo was taken the Titanic would collide with an iceberg, with over 1,500 on board perishing in the tragedy including the ship’s captain. The Titanic is one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history.

According to Time Magazine, Irish Jesuit priest Francis Browne is the photographer. Browne sailed with the ship for the first leg of its journey, from Southampton, England to Queenstown. The priest would have stayed for the remainder of the transatlantic journey too, having received an offer of a ticket from a wealthy family he befriended while on board. When Browne reached Cobh, however, he received a note from his clerical superior, ordering him to return to his station immediately rather than sail on with Titanic.

The Titanic was considered practically “unsinkable” because it was designed to stay afloat in the event the hull was pierced and internal flooding occurred. The design was based on the division of the hull into 15 transverse watertight bulkheads with each one incorporating watertight doors. The doors could be closed automatically in the event of an accident.

The compartments formed by the watertight bulkheads, however, were not independently watertight. This was a major oversight. If water filled a compartment higher than the top of a watertight bulkhead, then the adjoining compartments would flood. The design team assumed that this situation was impossible since all bulkheads rose to a level above the waterline.

It was strongly believed that when the Titanic hit the iceberg, a 350 foot gash was torn in the starboard side of the forward hull. The huge gash in the bow allowed water to infiltrate the ship and cause six of the sixteen watertight compartments to flood. The Titanic was designed to stay afloat if three or possibly four compartments flooded. As the sea rose above the watertight bulkheads, adjoining compartments filled with water (a simple way to conceptualize how Titanic flooded is to think of what happens when you fill an ice cube tray with water). The added water weight pulled Titanic’s bow deeper into the ocean until the great ship could not hold longer, and finally sank.

While the majority of those on board the Titanic did not survive the disaster, about 700 of the 2,200 passengers did. One survivor was a woman named Eva Hart. Hart was seven years old during the tragedy and lost her father; however, she went on to live her life with a positive outlook.

Here is a quote from Eva Hart, provided by Biography.com (http://www.biography.com/news/titanics-100th-anniversary-6-survivor-stories-20799733 ):

“People I meet always seem surprised that I do not hesitate to travel by train, car, airplane or ship when necessary. It is almost as if they expect me to be permanently quivering in my shoes at the thought of a journey. If I acted like that I would have died of fright many years ago—life has to be lived irrespective of the possible dangers and tragedies lurking round the corner.”

#Titanic #historicpictoric #history #historic #historical  #oldisgold #historical_photos #historicpictoric #historicphotos   #Dynamophone #history #historic #blackandwhite #blackandwhitephotos #blackandwhitephotography  
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-nx5PqBiMlrI/U9kz-8K45hI/AAAAAAAAAsA/BBvytaQEWIQ/w506-h750/The%2Blast%2Bpicture%2Bof%2BTitanic%2Btaken%2Bbefore%2Bsinking%252C%2B1912.jpg
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https://plus.google.com/117089612144881217418 Drake Abbychicka : The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912 This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic...
The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912

This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic on the surface of the ocean. It was taken during the maiden voyage—the only voyage— at Crosshaven, Ireland just after the vessel departed Queenstown,  the town now known as Cobh, Ireland. The ship stopped at Queenstown before embarking on its planned final destination, New York.

The photo was taken on April 12, 1912. Three days after this photo was taken the Titanic would collide with an iceberg, with over 1,500 on board perishing in the tragedy including the ship’s captain. The Titanic is one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history.

According to Time Magazine, Irish Jesuit priest Francis Browne is the photographer. Browne sailed with the ship for the first leg of its journey, from Southampton, England to Queenstown. The priest would have stayed for the remainder of the transatlantic journey too, having received an offer of a ticket from a wealthy family he befriended while on board. When Browne reached Cobh, however, he received a note from his clerical superior, ordering him to return to his station immediately rather than sail on with Titanic.

The Titanic was considered practically “unsinkable” because it was designed to stay afloat in the event the hull was pierced and internal flooding occurred. The design was based on the division of the hull into 15 transverse watertight bulkheads with each one incorporating watertight doors. The doors could be closed automatically in the event of an accident.

The compartments formed by the watertight bulkheads, however, were not independently watertight. This was a major oversight. If water filled a compartment higher than the top of a watertight bulkhead, then the adjoining compartments would flood. The design team assumed that this situation was impossible since all bulkheads rose to a level above the waterline.

It was strongly believed that when the Titanic hit the iceberg, a 350 foot gash was torn in the starboard side of the forward hull. The huge gash in the bow allowed water to infiltrate the ship and cause six of the sixteen watertight compartments to flood. The Titanic was designed to stay afloat if three or possibly four compartments flooded. As the sea rose above the watertight bulkheads, adjoining compartments filled with water (a simple way to conceptualize how Titanic flooded is to think of what happens when you fill an ice cube tray with water). The added water weight pulled Titanic’s bow deeper into the ocean until the great ship could not hold longer, and finally sank.

While the majority of those on board the Titanic did not survive the disaster, about 700 of the 2,200 passengers did. One survivor was a woman named Eva Hart. Hart was seven years old during the tragedy and lost her father; however, she went on to live her life with a positive outlook.

Here is a quote from Eva Hart, provided by Biography.com (http://www.biography.com/news/titanics-100th-anniversary-6-survivor-stories-20799733 ):

“People I meet always seem surprised that I do not hesitate to travel by train, car, airplane or ship when necessary. It is almost as if they expect me to be permanently quivering in my shoes at the thought of a journey. If I acted like that I would have died of fright many years ago—life has to be lived irrespective of the possible dangers and tragedies lurking round the corner.”

#Titanic #historicpictoric #history #historic #historical  #oldisgold #historical_photos #historicpictoric #historicphotos   #Dynamophone #history #historic #blackandwhite #blackandwhitephotos #blackandwhitephotography  
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-nx5PqBiMlrI/U9kz-8K45hI/AAAAAAAAAsA/BBvytaQEWIQ/w506-h750/The%2Blast%2Bpicture%2Bof%2BTitanic%2Btaken%2Bbefore%2Bsinking%252C%2B1912.jpg
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https://plus.google.com/110691649993979230480 Dave Howell : Words Are Fun! Time magazine mentioned Weird Al's new video "Tacky" from his new album Mandatory Fun...
Words Are Fun!

Time magazine mentioned Weird Al's new video "Tacky" from his new album Mandatory Fun; After watching it, I checked out some related links and found myself delirious with joy over the video for "Word Crimes." I haven't a clue what original song it's a parody of, nor do I care. The lyrics make it a 'must see' for all my literary friends (+Janna Silverstein , +Elizabeth Bourne , +Rachel Holmen , oh good grief, why am I even trying, there are too many of you), and the video itself is that uniquely 21st century thing, the kinetic typography (+John Berry I'm looking at you) video.  In fact, it's the best piece of work I've seen since the mind-blowing animation for Jonathan Coulton's "Shop-Vac". 

Which, as it turns out, isn't all that much of a coincidence. Al or some minion of his hired Jarrett Heather to do the video. Hooray!
Watch the video: "Weird Al" Yankovic - Word Crimes
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/proxy/13Z_G-kR-E6eX7ekZ-_LbyuWXTK-YzYUAqN9-Xqk4ZD60w1p9VikSuGLN387B0XRZl50NoExxmztwgHgyB8Djy6AJw=w506-h284-n
"Weird Al" Yankovic's new album "Mandatory Fun" out now on iTunes: http://smarturl.it/MandatoryFun Amazon: http://smarturl.it/MandatoryFunAMZ Google Play: ht...
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https://plus.google.com/115663323440482696889 Berlin Friswell : The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912 This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic...
The last known photo of the Titanic afloat, 1912

This photograph is the last known picture of RMS Titanic on the surface of the ocean. It was taken during the maiden voyage—the only voyage— at Crosshaven, Ireland just after the vessel departed Queenstown,  the town now known as Cobh, Ireland. The ship stopped at Queenstown before embarking on its planned final destination, New York.

The photo was taken on April 12, 1912. Three days after this photo was taken the Titanic would collide with an iceberg, with over 1,500 on board perishing in the tragedy including the ship’s captain. The Titanic is one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history.

According to Time Magazine, Irish Jesuit priest Francis Browne is the photographer. Browne sailed with the ship for the first leg of its journey, from Southampton, England to Queenstown. The priest would have stayed for the remainder of the transatlantic journey too, having received an offer of a ticket from a wealthy family he befriended while on board. When Browne reached Cobh, however, he received a note from his clerical superior, ordering him to return to his station immediately rather than sail on with Titanic.

The Titanic was considered practically “unsinkable” because it was designed to stay afloat in the event the hull was pierced and internal flooding occurred. The design was based on the division of the hull into 15 transverse watertight bulkheads with each one incorporating watertight doors. The doors could be closed automatically in the event of an accident.

The compartments formed by the watertight bulkheads, however, were not independently watertight. This was a major oversight. If water filled a compartment higher than the top of a watertight bulkhead, then the adjoining compartments would flood. The design team assumed that this situation was impossible since all bulkheads rose to a level above the waterline.

It was strongly believed that when the Titanic hit the iceberg, a 350 foot gash was torn in the starboard side of the forward hull. The huge gash in the bow allowed water to infiltrate the ship and cause six of the sixteen watertight compartments to flood. The Titanic was designed to stay afloat if three or possibly four compartments flooded. As the sea rose above the watertight bulkheads, adjoining compartments filled with water (a simple way to conceptualize how Titanic flooded is to think of what happens when you fill an ice cube tray with water). The added water weight pulled Titanic’s bow deeper into the ocean until the great ship could not hold longer, and finally sank.

While the majority of those on board the Titanic did not survive the disaster, about 700 of the 2,200 passengers did. One survivor was a woman named Eva Hart. Hart was seven years old during the tragedy and lost her father; however, she went on to live her life with a positive outlook.

Here is a quote from Eva Hart, provided by Biography.com (http://www.biography.com/news/titanics-100th-anniversary-6-survivor-stories-20799733 ):

“People I meet always seem surprised that I do not hesitate to travel by train, car, airplane or ship when necessary. It is almost as if they expect me to be permanently quivering in my shoes at the thought of a journey. If I acted like that I would have died of fright many years ago—life has to be lived irrespective of the possible dangers and tragedies lurking round the corner.”

#Titanic #historicpictoric #history #historic #historical  #oldisgold #historical_photos #historicpictoric #historicphotos   #Dynamophone #history #historic #blackandwhite #blackandwhitephotos #blackandwhitephotography  
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-nx5PqBiMlrI/U9kz-8K45hI/AAAAAAAAAsA/BBvytaQEWIQ/w506-h750/The%2Blast%2Bpicture%2Bof%2BTitanic%2Btaken%2Bbefore%2Bsinking%252C%2B1912.jpg
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https://plus.google.com/101818199751844416663 DEJI OF LAGOS : INSIDE THE MIND OF A FEMALE SUICIDE BOMBER! Source: TIME Magazine No one remembers Hasna Maryi ever ...
INSIDE THE MIND OF A FEMALE SUICIDE BOMBER!
Source: TIME Magazine No one remembers Hasna Maryi ever opening her family’s Koran. She rarely attended her village mosque and told others she regarded the Imam there as a lech. So it was not religious extremism that made this villager from Anbar province b...
INSIDE THE MIND OF A FEMALE SUICIDE BOMBER! | DEJI OF LAGOS

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