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Most recent 20 results returned for keyword: TIME Magazine (Search this on MAP)

https://plus.google.com/114596273911984505042 Jeremiah Harding : Ah, +Time Magazine ...never change. 
Ah, +Time Magazine ...never change. 
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https://plus.google.com/102457644561315049068 Julius Francisco : Lump BodyTech, one of TIME Magazine's list Best Inventions of 2014, announced its integration with the...
Lump BodyTech, one of TIME Magazine's list Best Inventions of 2014, announced its integration with the Validic digital health platform to provide posture tracking for healthcare and wellness companies.

With 70% of the population suffering from back pain and its prevalence as a leading cause of missed workdays, the actionable feedback the Lumo Lift provides users is set to become a standard tool for success in both personal health monitoring and in the workplace.

We are excited to welcome Lumo Lift to Validic's industry leading digital health ecosystem.
Lumo Lift Posture Coach Is the Hot New Wearable for Corporate Wellness
PALO ALTO, CA--(Marketwired - May 28, 2015) - Today, Lumo BodyTech announced its integration with Validic, the healthcare industry's leading digital health platform. Lumo Lift, the world's first digital posture coach and activity tracker, was released last fall to wide acclaim, including making TIME Magazine's list of The 25 Best...
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https://plus.google.com/103964933165934162449 Waffles at Noon : A 2015 TIME magazine cover asking who killed summer vacation has been compared against a 2010 cover ...
A 2015 TIME magazine cover asking who killed summer vacation has been compared against a 2010 cover making a case against summer vacation.

The topics addressed in these articles, however, are different. The 2010 article looks at the effect of long summer breaks on kids, while the 2015 article looks at why American employees take less vacation time than in years past.

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https://plus.google.com/101670248192604004074 Francesca Van der Geld : James Baldwin: James Arthur Baldwin (August 2, 1924 – December 1, 1987) was an American novelist, essayist...
James Baldwin:

James Arthur Baldwin (August 2, 1924 – December 1, 1987) was an American novelist, essayist, playwright, poet, and social critic. His essays, as collected in Notes of a Native Son (1955), explore palpable yet unspoken intricacies of racial, sexual, and class distinctions in Western societies, most notably in mid-20th-century America, and their inevitable if unnameable tensions.

Some Baldwin essays are book-length, for instance The Fire Next Time (1963), No Name in the Street (1972), and The Devil Finds Work (1976).

Baldwin's novels and plays fictionalize fundamental personal questions and dilemmas amid complex social and psychological pressures thwarting the equitable integration of not only blacks, but also of gay and bisexual men, while depicting some internalized obstacles to such individuals' quests for acceptance. Such dynamics are prominent in Baldwin's second novel, written well before gay equality was widely espoused in America: Giovanni's Room (1956). Baldwin's first novel, Go Tell It on the Mountain, is said to be his best-known work.

Early life:
When Baldwin was an infant, his mother, Emma Berdis Jones, divorced his father amid his drug abuse and moved to the Harlem section of Manhattan in New York City. There, she married a preacher, David Baldwin. The family was very poor.

James spent much time caring for his several younger brothers and sisters. At the age of ten, he was beaten by a gang of police officers. His adoptive father, whom James in essays called simply his father, appears to have treated James—versus James's siblings—with singular harshness.

His stepfather died of tuberculosis in summer of 1943 soon before James turned 19. The day of the funeral was James's 19th birthday, the day his father's last child was born, and the day of the Harlem Riot of 1943, which was the portrait opening his essay "Notes of a Native Son". The quest to answer or explain familial and social repudiation—and attain a sense of self, both coherent and benevolent—became a motif in Baldwin's writing.

Schooling:
James attended P.S. 24 on 128th Street between Fifth and Madison in Harlem where he wrote the school song, which was used until the school closed down. His middle school years were spent at Frederick Douglass Junior High where he was influenced by poet Countee Cullen, a leading figure in the Harlem Renaissance, and was encouraged by his math teacher to serve as editor of the school newspaper, The Douglass Pilot. He then went on to DeWitt Clinton High School, in the Bronx's Bedford Park section. There, along with Richard Avedon, he worked on the school magazine—Baldwin as its literary editor—but disliked school because of racial remarks.

Religion:
The difficulties of his life, as well as his abusive preacher stepfather, led Baldwin to become a part of the church. At age 14 he attended meetings of the Pentecostal Church and, during a euphoric prayer meeting, he converted. Soon, as a junior minister at the Fireside Pentecostal Assembly, he drew larger crowds than his stepfather did. At 17, however, Baldwin came to view Christianity as falsely premised and later regarded his time in the pulpit as a remedy to his personal crises.

Baldwin once visited Elijah Muhammad, founder of the Nation of Islam, who inquired about Baldwin's religious beliefs. He answered, "I left the church 20 years ago and haven't joined anything since." Elijah asked, "And what are you now?" Baldwin explained, "I? Now? Nothing. I'm a writer. I like doing things alone." Still, his church experience significantly shaped his world-view and writing. Baldwin reflected that "being in the pulpit was like being in the theatre; I was behind the scenes and knew how the illusion was worked."

Baldwin admonished Christianity for, as he explained, reinforcing the system of American slavery by palliating the pangs of oppression and delaying salvation until a promised afterlife. Baldwin praised religion, however, for inspiring some American blacks to defy oppression. Baldwin once wrote, "If the concept of God has any use, it is to make us larger, freer, and more loving. If God can't do that, it's time we got rid of him". Baldwin publicly expresses himself as not religious. At his funeral, a mostly a cappella recording of the adult Baldwin singing "Take My Hand, Precious Lord" was played.

Greenwich Village:
When Baldwin was 15, his high-school running buddy, Emile Capouya, skipped school one day and, in Greenwich Village, met Beauford Delaney, a painter. Emile gave James the address, and suggested a visit. James, who worked at a sweatshop nearby on Canal Street and dreaded going home after school, visited Beauford at 181 Greene Street. He became a mentor to Baldwin, and Beauford's influence brought him to his first realization that a black person could be an artist.

While working odd jobs, he wrote short stories, essays, and book reviews, some of them collected in the volume Notes of a Native Son (1955). He befriended the actor Marlon Brando in 1944 and the two were room-mates for a time. They would remain friends for more than 20 years.

Expatriation:
James Baldwin, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1955
During his teenage years in Harlem and Greenwich Village, Baldwin started to realize that he was gay. In 1948, Baldwin walked into a restaurant where he knew he could not be served. When the waitress explained that black people were not served at the establishment, James Baldwin threw a glass of water at her, shattering the mirror behind the bar. As a result of being disillusioned by American prejudice against blacks and gays, Baldwin left the United States at the age of 24 and settled in Paris, France. His flight was not just a desire to distance himself from American prejudice, but to see himself and his writing beyond an African-American context. Baldwin did not want to be read as "merely a Negro; or, even, merely a Negro writer". Also, he left the United States desiring to come to terms with his sexual ambivalence and flee the hopelessness that many young African-American men like himself succumbed to in New York.

In Paris, Baldwin was soon involved in the cultural radicalism of the Left Bank. His work started to be published in literary anthologies, notably Zero, which was edited by his friend Themistocles Hoetis and which had already published essays by Richard Wright.

He would live in France for most of his later life. He would also spend some time in Switzerland and Turkey. During his life and after it, Baldwin would be seen not only as an influential African-American writer but also as an influential exile writer, particularly because of his numerous experiences outside the United States and the impact of these experiences on Baldwin's life and his writing.

Saint-Paul de Vence:
James Baldwin in his house in Saint-Paul de Vence
Baldwin settled in Saint-Paul de Vence (South of France) in 1970, in an old Provence house beneath the ramparts of the famous village. His house was always open to his friends, who would never fail to pop in and say hello when visiting the French Riviera. American painter Beauford Delaney made Baldwin's house in Saint-Paul de Vence his second home, often setting up his easel in the garden. Delaney painted several colourful portraits of Baldwin. Actors Harry Belafonte and Sidney Poitier were also regular house guests.
A lot of Baldwin's musician friends dropped in during the Nice and Juan-les-Pins jazz festivals: Nina Simone, Josephine Baker (whose sister lived in Nice), Miles Davis and Ray Charles for whom James Baldwin composed several pieces of music. In his biography, musician Miles Davis wrote:
I'd read his books and I liked and respected what he had to say. When I got to know him better, Jimmy and I opened up to each other. We became great friends. Every time I was in the South of France, in Antibes, I would spend a day or two at his villa in Saint-Paul de Vence. We'd get comfy in that beautiful, big house and he would tell us all sorts of stories.... He was a great man.

Baldwin spoke impeccable French and developed friendships with French actor Yves Montand and French writer Marguerite Yourcenar, who translated Baldwin's play The Amen Corner.
His years in Saint-Paul de Vence were also years of work. Sitting in front of his sturdy typewriter, his days were devoted to writing and to answering the huge amount of mail he received from all over the world. He wrote several of his last works in his house in Saint Paul de Vence, including Just Above My Head in 1979 and Evidence of Things Not Seen in 1985. It was also in his Saint-Paul de Vence house that Baldwin wrote his famous "Open Letter to My Sister, Angela Y. Davis" in November 1970.

Literary career:
Baldwin with Shakespeare by Allan Warren
In 1953, Baldwin's first novel, Go Tell It on the Mountain, a semi-autobiographical bildungsroman, was published. His first collection of essays, Notes of a Native Son appeared two years later. He continued to experiment with literary forms throughout his career, publishing poetry and plays as well as the fiction and essays for which he was known.

Baldwin's second novel, Giovanni's Room, stirred controversy when it was first published in 1956 due to its explicit homoerotic content. Baldwin was again resisting labels with the publication of this work: despite the reading public's expectations that he would publish works dealing with the African-American experience, Giovanni's Room is predominantly about white characters. Baldwin's next two novels, Another Country and Tell Me How Long the Train's Been Gone, are sprawling, experimental works dealing with black and white characters and with heterosexual, gay, and bisexual characters. These novels struggle to contain the turbulence of the 1960s: they are saturated with a sense of violent unrest and outrage.

Baldwin's lengthy essay "Down at the Cross" (frequently called The Fire Next Time after the title of the book in which it was published) similarly showed the seething discontent of the 1960s in novel form. The essay was originally published in two oversized issues of The New Yorker and landed Baldwin on the cover of Time magazine in 1963 while Baldwin was touring the South speaking about the restive Civil Rights movement. Around the time of publication of The Fire Next Time, Baldwin became a known spokesperson for civil rights and a celebrity noted for championing the cause of black Americans. He frequently appeared on television and delivered speeches on college campuses. The essay talked about the uneasy relationship between Christianity and the burgeoning Black Muslim movement. After publication, several black nationalists criticized Baldwin for his conciliatory attitude. They questioned whether his message of love and understanding would do much to change race relations in America. The book was eagerly consumed by whites looking for answers to the question: What do blacks really want? Baldwin's essays never stopped articulating the anger and frustration felt by real-life black Americans with more clarity and style than any other writer of his generation. Baldwin's next book-length essay, No Name in the Street, also discussed his own experience in the context of the later 1960s, specifically the assassinations of three of his personal friends: Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King, Jr.
Baldwin's writings of the 1970s and 1980s have been largely overlooked by critics, though even these texts are beginning to receive attention. Several of his essays and interviews of the 1980s discuss homosexuality and homophobia with fervour and forthrightness. Eldridge Cleaver's harsh criticism of Baldwin in Soul on Ice and elsewhere and Baldwin's return to southern France contributed to the sense that he was not in touch with his readership.

Always true to his own convictions rather than to the tastes of others, Baldwin continued to write what he wanted to write. As he had been the leading literary voice of the civil rights movement, he became an inspirational figure for the emerging gay rights movement. His two novels written in the 1970s, If Beale Street Could Talk and Just Above My Head, placed a strong emphasis on the importance of black families, and he concluded his career by publishing a volume of poetry, Jimmy's Blues, as well as another book-length essay, The Evidence of Things Not Seen, which was an extended meditation inspired by the Atlanta Child Murders of the early 1980s.

Social and political activism:

Baldwin returned to the United States in the summer of 1957 while the Civil Rights Act of that year was being debated in Congress. He had been powerfully moved by the image of a young girl braving a mob in an attempt to desegregate schools in Charlotte, N.C., and Partisan Review editor Philip Rahv had suggested he report on what was happening in the American south. Baldwin was nervous about the trip but he made it, interviewing people in Charlotte (where he met Martin Luther King), and Montgomery, Alabama. The result was two essays, one published in Harper's magazine ("The Hard Kind of Courage"), the other in Partisan Review ("Nobody Knows My Name"). Subsequent Baldwin articles on the movement appeared in Mademoiselle, Harper's, the New York Times Magazine, and the New Yorker, where in 1962 he published the essay he called "Down at the Cross" and the New Yorker called "Letter from a Region of My Mind". Along with a shorter essay from The Progressive, the essay became The Fire Next Time.

While he wrote about the movement, Baldwin aligned himself with the ideals of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). In 1963 he conducted a lecture tour of the South for CORE, traveling to locations like Durham and Greensboro, North Carolina and New Orleans, Louisiana. During the tour, he lectured to students, white liberals, and anyone else listening about his racial ideology, an ideological position between the "muscular approach" of Malcolm X and the non-violent program of Martin Luther King Jr.. Baldwin expressed the hope that Socialism would take root in the United States.

By the spring of 1963, Baldwin had become so much a spokesman for the Civil Rights Movement that for its May 17 issue on the turmoil in Birmingham, Alabama, Time magazine put James Baldwin on the cover. "There is not another writer," said Time, "who expresses with such poignancy and abrasiveness the dark realities of the racial ferment in North and South." In a cable Baldwin sent to Attorney General Robert Kennedy during the crisis, Baldwin blamed the violence in Birmingham on the FBI, J. Edgar Hoover, Mississippi Senator James O. Eastland, and President Kennedy for failing to use "the great prestige of his office as the moral forum which it can be." Attorney General Kennedy invited Baldwin to meet with him over breakfast, and that meeting was followed up with a second, when Kennedy met with Baldwin and others Baldwin had invited to Kennedy's Manhattan apartment (see Baldwin-Kennedy_meeting). This meeting is discussed in Howard Simon's 1999 play, "James Baldwin: A Soul on Fire"The delegation included Kenneth B. Clark, a psychologist who had played a key role in the Brown v. Board of Education decision; actor Harry Belafonte, singer Lena Horne, writer Lorraine Hansberry, and activists from civil rights organizations. Although most of the attendees of this meeting left feeling "devastated," the meeting was an important one in voicing the concerns of the civil rights movement and it provided exposure of the civil rights issue not just as a political issue but also as a moral issue.

Baldwin also made a prominent appearance at the Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. on August 28, 1963, with Belafonte and long-time friends Sidney Poitier and Marlon Brando. The civil rights movement was hostile to homosexuals. The only known gay men in the movement were James Baldwin and Bayard Rustin. Rustin and King were very close, as Rustin received credit for the success of the March on Washington. Many were bothered by Rustin's sexual orientation. King himself spoke on the topic of sexual orientation in a school editorial column during his college years. The pressure later resulted in King distancing himself from both men. At the time, Baldwin was neither in the closet or open to the public about his sexual orientation. Later on, Baldwin was conspicuously uninvited to speak at the end of the March on Washington. After a bomb exploded in a Birmingham church not long after the March on Washington, Baldwin called for a nationwide campaign of civil disobedience in response to this "terrifying crisis." He travelled to Selma, Alabama, where SNCC had organized a voter registration drive; he watched mothers with babies and elderly men and women standing in long lines for hours, as armed deputies and state troopers stood by—or intervened to smash a reporter's camera or use cattle prods on SNCC workers. After his day of watching, he spoke in a crowded church, blaming Washington—"the good white people on the hill." Returning to Washington, he told a New York Post reporter the federal government could protect Negroes—it could send federal troops into the South. He blamed the Kennedys for not acting. In March 1965, Baldwin joined marchers who walked 50 miles from Selma, Alabama, to the capitol in Montgomery under the protection of federal troops.

Nonetheless, he rejected the label civil rights activist, or that he had participated in a civil rights movement, instead agreeing with Malcolm X's assertion that if one is a citizen, one should not have to fight for one's civil rights. In an 1964 interview with Robert Penn Warren for the book Who Speaks for the Negro?, Baldwin refuted the idea that the civil rights movement was an outright revolution, instead calling it "a very peculiar revolution because it has to...have its aims the establishment of a union, and a...radical shift in the American mores, the American way of life...not only as it applies to the Negro obviously, but as it applies to every citizen of the country." In a 1979 speech at UC Berkeley, he called it, instead, "the latest slave rebellion."

In 1968, Baldwin signed the “Writers and Editors War Tax Protest” pledge, vowing to refuse tax payments in protest against the Vietnam War.

Inspiration and relationships:
Richard Wright (1908–1960) photographed in 1939 by Carl Van Vechten
As a young man, Baldwin's poetry teacher was Countee Cullen.
A great influence on Baldwin was the painter Beauford Delaney. In The Price of the Ticket (1985), Baldwin describes Delaney as
"the first living proof, for me, that a black man could be an artist. In a warmer time, a less blasphemous place, he would have been recognized as my teacher and I as his pupil. He became, for me, an example of courage and integrity, humility and passion. An absolute integrity: I saw him shaken many times and I lived to see him broken but I never saw him bow."

Later support came from Richard Wright, whom Baldwin called "the greatest black writer in the world." Wright and Baldwin became friends, and Wright helped Baldwin secure the Eugene F. Saxon Memorial Award. Baldwin's essay "Notes of a Native Son" and his collection Notes of a Native Son allude to Wright's novel Native Son. In Baldwin's 1949 essay "Everybody's Protest Novel", however, he indicated that Native Son, like Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, lacked credible characters and psychological complexity, and the friendship between the two authors ended. Interviewed by Julius Lester, however, Baldwin explained, "I knew Richard and I loved him. I was not attacking him; I was trying to clarify something for myself." In 1965, Baldwin participated in a debate with William F. Buckley, on the topic of whether the American dream has adversely affected African Americans. The debate took place at Cambridge University in the UK. The speculating student body voted overwhelmingly in Baldwin's favour.

In 1949 Baldwin met and fell in love with Lucien Happersberger, aged 17, though Happersberger's marriage three years later left Baldwin distraught. Happersberger died on August 21, 2010, in Switzerland.
Baldwin was a close friend of the singer, pianist, and civil rights activist Nina Simone. With Langston Hughes and Lorraine Hansberry, Baldwin helped awaken Simone to the civil rights movement then gelling. Baldwin also provided her with literary references influential on her later work. Baldwin and Hansberry met with Robert F. Kennedy, along with Kenneth Clark and Lena Horne and others (see Baldwin–Kennedy_meeting) in an attempt to persuade Kennedy of the importance of civil rights legislation.

Baldwin influenced the work of French painter Philippe Derome, who he met in Paris in the early 1960s. Baldwin also knew Marlon Brando, Charlton Heston, Billy Dee Williams, Huey P. Newton, Nikki Giovanni, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Genet (with whom he campaigned on behalf of the Black Panther Party), Lee Strasberg, Elia Kazan, Rip Torn, Alex Haley, Miles Davis, Amiri Baraka, Martin Luther King, Jr., Margaret Mead, Josephine Baker, Allen Ginsberg, Chinua Achebe and Maya Angelou. He wrote at length about his "political relationship" with Malcolm X. He collaborated with childhood friend Richard Avedon on the book Nothing Personal, which is available for public viewing at the Schomburg Center in Harlem.

Maya Angelou called Baldwin her "friend and brother", and credited him for "setting the stage" for her 1969 autobiography I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. Baldwin was made a Commandeur de la Légion d'honneur by the French government in 1986.

Baldwin was also a close friend of Nobel Prize-winning novelist Toni Morrison. Upon his death, Morrison wrote a eulogy for Baldwin that appeared in the New York Times. In the eulogy, entitled "Life in His Language," Morrison credits Baldwin as being her literary inspiration and the person who showed her the true potential of writing. She writes,

You knew, didn't you, how I needed your language and the mind that formed it? How I relied on your fierce courage to tame wildernesses for me? How strengthened I was by the certainty that came from knowing you would never hurt me? You knew, didn't you, how I loved your love? You knew. This then is no calamity. No. This is jubilee. 'Our crown,' you said, 'has already been bought and paid for. All we have to do,' you said, 'is wear it.'

Death:
Early on December 1, 1987, (some sources say late on November 30) Baldwin died from oesophageal cancer in Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France. He was buried at the Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale, near New York City.

Legacy:
Baldwin's influence on other writers has been profound: Toni Morrison edited the Library of America two-volume editions of Baldwin's fiction and essays, and a recent collection of critical essays links these two writers.

One of Baldwin's richest short stories, "Sonny's Blues", appears in many anthologies of short fiction used in introductory college literature classes.

In 1986, within the work The Story of English, Robert MacNeil, with Robert McCrum and William Cran, mentioned James Baldwin as an influential writer of African-American Literature, on the level of Booker T. Washington, and held both men up as prime examples of Black writers.

In 1987, Kevin Brown, a photo-journalist from Baltimore, founded the National James Baldwin Literary Society. The group organizes free public events celebrating Baldwin's life and legacy.
In 1992, Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts, established the James Baldwin Scholars program, an urban outreach initiative, in honour of Baldwin, who taught at Hampshire in the early 1980s. The JBS Program provides talented students of colour from under-served communities an opportunity to develop and improve the skills necessary for college success through coursework and tutorial support for one transitional year, after which Baldwin scholars may apply for full matriculation to Hampshire or any other four-year college programme.

In 2002, scholar Molefi Kete Asante included James Baldwin on his list of 100 Greatest African Americans.
In 2005, the USPS created a first-class postage stamp dedicated to Baldwin, which featured him on the front, with a short biography on the back of the peeling paper.

In 2012 James Baldwin was inducted into the Legacy Walk, an outdoor public display which celebrates LGBT history and people.
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https://plus.google.com/116274259304586183128 James Simmons : Ah, +Time Magazine ...never change. 
Ah, +Time Magazine ...never change. 
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https://plus.google.com/100637963135390296653 Bellco Credit Union : Malala Yousafzai, recipient of the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize and one of Time Magazine's 100 most influential...
Malala Yousafzai, recipient of the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize and one of Time Magazine's 100 most influential people in the world, will make a speaking appearance at the Bellco Theatre on June 24 at 7 p.m. Tickets are running out but starting today, and running through Tuesday, June 2, you can enter to win one of four pairs of tickets to attend the event over on Facebook by clicking on the link below. Winners will be contacted on Wednesday, June 3.

Good luck everyone!
Bellco Credit Union
Since 1936, Bellco Credit Union has been passionately committed to improving our members’ quality...
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https://plus.google.com/115006155645681906734 Jay R North : Ah, +Time Magazine ...never change. 
Ah, +Time Magazine ...never change. 
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https://plus.google.com/100690249023567142481 JustTheHandmaid'sDaughter : Today's (7th May) Distressful Quotes, to THINK about! When humans become animals and criminals and ...
Today's (7th May) Distressful Quotes, to THINK about!

When humans become animals and criminals and are still honored by an ignorant society


Winston Churchill said:

German cities  . . .  will be subjected to an ordeal the like of which has never been experienced by a country in continuity, severity and magnitude  . . . To achieve this end there are no lengths of violence to which we will not go

[cf. Garrett, Stephen A. Ethics and Airpower in World War II—The British Bombing of German Cities. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1993. Page 31]
 


George Patton said :

Evidently the virus started by Morgenthau of a Semitic revenge against all Germans is still working  . . .  I can’t see how Americans can sink so low.

[ cf. Martin Blumenson, The Patton Papers—1940–1945 (New York: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1972)]
 

 
A US Sergeant said:

Our own Army and the British Army . . . have done their share of looting and raping . . . [W]e too are considered an army of rapists.

[cf. Kelling, 61; Time Magazine, Nov. 12, 1945; Life Magazine, Jan. 7, 1946.]



A German Rape Victim said :

The Russians were coming and going the whole time and they kept eyeing us greedily. The nights were dreadful because we were never safe for a moment. The women were raped, not once or twice but ten, twenty, thirty and a hundred times, and it was all the same to the Russians whether they raped mere children or old women. The youngest victim in the row houses where we lived was ten years of age and the oldest one was over seventy. . . . 


[cf. Kaps, Johannes, ed. The Tragedy of Silesia, 1945–46—A Documentary Account with a Special Survey of the Archdiocese of Breslau. Munich: Christ Unterwegs, 1952/53. Page 136]
 


Winston Churchill said:

Don’t mind the five or more million Germans. Stalin will see to them. You will not have trouble with them: they will cease to exist.

[cf. Keeling, Ralph Franklin.Gruesome Harvest—The Allies’ Postwar War Against the German People. 1947. Reprint. Torrance, Calif.: Institute for Historical Review, 1992. Page 13]
 
 

The real holocaust where German civilians were actually burned to death https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=tU5u7aoSxFQ
 
 
This is nothing compared to what awaits you and your future.!
Watch the video: Hellstorm - The Dresden Holocaust
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More people died in the fire bombing of Dresden on February 13th to 14th, 1945 than in the nuclear bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki combined. Holocaust (no...
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https://plus.google.com/117387116338582289642 RAIIN Brown : Michael Jackson's Neverland Ranch hits market at $100M Michael Jackson's Neverland Ranch just hit the...
Michael Jackson's Neverland Ranch hits market at $100M
Michael Jackson's Neverland Ranch just hit the market, the Wall Street Journal reports.
Details so far are fairly scant, but one certainly jumps out: The asking price is $100 million -- "very optimistic," the Los Angeles Times is told by one Randall Bell, a "specialist in evaluating stigmatized properties."

"It's hard to get by the fact that Neverland is closely associated with child molestation," Bell tells the Times. (Indeed, a fascinating Times story during Jackson's 2005 trial was headlined "Neverland: Paradise or Trap?" and characterized the ranch as "a shrine to innocence or a shortcut to depravity.")

The county assesses it at about $30 million.

(Click here or on a photo for a slideshow with dozens of photos inside and out.)

Jackson created Neverland from what was once known as Sycamore Valley Ranch — the name that it has resumed, according to the listing agents. He lost control of it amid financial problems not long before his 2009 death.

Its 2,700-odd acres lie outside Santa Barbara in Los Olivos, California. The six-bedroom main house has about 12,000 square feet of living space; there are also about 20 other buildings on the property, listing agent Suzanne Perkins told the Wall Street Journal.

Sycamore Valley Ranch was built in 1981 by developer William Bone, who is known especially for his golf course properties. He sold it to Jackson in 1988 for $19.5 million.

Jackson is said to have put upward of $30 million into Neverland improvements, including an amusement park, a train, animal menageries and more. Most of those additions are gone now -- though the Journal notes without elaborating that "there is currently a llama on the property."


The tub faucet in the master bath. Click any photo for an extensive slideshow.
The tub faucet in the master bath. Click any photo for an extensive slideshow.
Investment firm Colony Capital, led by Tom Barrack, bought out the $23 million mortgage in 2008 when foreclosure threatened Jackson. Colony and Jackson formed what was intended to be a joint business venture, but he died the next year at age 50. It's Colony that is now selling Neverland.
"Our seller is not encouraging a lot of showings," listing agent Jeff Hyland told the Journal, and his colleague Suzanne Perkins concurred: "We're not going to be giving tours."

Time magazine says that "the person selling the ranch is specifically looking for a buyer who doesn't plan to turn the place into a museum for the singer," but Yahoo Homes was not able to confirm or corroborate Time's claim.

Yahoo Homes could not reach Hyland or Perkins for comment; their offices instead referred us to a public relations firm, which said that no one would be commenting on the story.

However, we did reach the third listing agent, Harry Kolb of Sotheby's, who -- when we mentioned that he must be deluged with media interest -- acknowledged with a laugh, "It's a wonderful storm."

Then he referred us to the PR firm.
https://homes.yahoo.com/blogs/spaces/michael-jackson-s-neverland-ranch-hits-market-at--100m-233521574.html
Michael Jackson's Neverland Ranch hits market at $100M
The King of Pop bought Sycamore Valley Ranch in 1988, then transformed it into Neverland.
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https://plus.google.com/113992727766046873216 Prestige food and wine ltd (warehouse) : 7 Things You Never Knew Were In Your Wine This TIME Magazine article, featuring Washington State University...
7 Things You Never Knew Were In Your Wine
This TIME Magazine article, featuring Washington State University associate professor of enology Jim Harbertson, will let you know exactly what you’re drinking, and how it affects you, beyond a nice buzz

http://time.com/3897828/wine-lingo-health-effects/

#wine   #food   #drinks   #weekendfun   #weekend   #london   #fan  
7 Things You Never Knew Were In Your Wine
Low-alcohol wines are lighter on calories
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https://plus.google.com/113386150109757099982 peter imrich : Robert Reich's Documentary " Inequality for All" ROBERT B. REICH, Chancellor’s Professor of Public ...
Robert Reich's Documentary " Inequality for All"

ROBERT B. REICH, Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley and Senior Fellow at the Blum Center for Developing Economies, was Secretary of Labor in the Clinton administration. Time Magazine named him one of the…
Robert Reich's Documentary " Inequality for All"
ROBERT B. REICH, Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley and Senior Fellow at the Blum Center for Developing Economies, was Secretary of Labor in the Cli...
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https://plus.google.com/113262768264704941534 D3 Hood TV : Michael Jackson's Neverland Ranch hits market at $100M Michael Jackson's Neverland Ranch just hit the...
Michael Jackson's Neverland Ranch hits market at $100M
Michael Jackson's Neverland Ranch just hit the market, the Wall Street Journal reports.
Details so far are fairly scant, but one certainly jumps out: The asking price is $100 million -- "very optimistic," the Los Angeles Times is told by one Randall Bell, a "specialist in evaluating stigmatized properties."

"It's hard to get by the fact that Neverland is closely associated with child molestation," Bell tells the Times. (Indeed, a fascinating Times story during Jackson's 2005 trial was headlined "Neverland: Paradise or Trap?" and characterized the ranch as "a shrine to innocence or a shortcut to depravity.")

The county assesses it at about $30 million.

(Click here or on a photo for a slideshow with dozens of photos inside and out.)

Jackson created Neverland from what was once known as Sycamore Valley Ranch — the name that it has resumed, according to the listing agents. He lost control of it amid financial problems not long before his 2009 death.

Its 2,700-odd acres lie outside Santa Barbara in Los Olivos, California. The six-bedroom main house has about 12,000 square feet of living space; there are also about 20 other buildings on the property, listing agent Suzanne Perkins told the Wall Street Journal.

Sycamore Valley Ranch was built in 1981 by developer William Bone, who is known especially for his golf course properties. He sold it to Jackson in 1988 for $19.5 million.

Jackson is said to have put upward of $30 million into Neverland improvements, including an amusement park, a train, animal menageries and more. Most of those additions are gone now -- though the Journal notes without elaborating that "there is currently a llama on the property."


The tub faucet in the master bath. Click any photo for an extensive slideshow.
The tub faucet in the master bath. Click any photo for an extensive slideshow.
Investment firm Colony Capital, led by Tom Barrack, bought out the $23 million mortgage in 2008 when foreclosure threatened Jackson. Colony and Jackson formed what was intended to be a joint business venture, but he died the next year at age 50. It's Colony that is now selling Neverland.
"Our seller is not encouraging a lot of showings," listing agent Jeff Hyland told the Journal, and his colleague Suzanne Perkins concurred: "We're not going to be giving tours."

Time magazine says that "the person selling the ranch is specifically looking for a buyer who doesn't plan to turn the place into a museum for the singer," but Yahoo Homes was not able to confirm or corroborate Time's claim.

Yahoo Homes could not reach Hyland or Perkins for comment; their offices instead referred us to a public relations firm, which said that no one would be commenting on the story.

However, we did reach the third listing agent, Harry Kolb of Sotheby's, who -- when we mentioned that he must be deluged with media interest -- acknowledged with a laugh, "It's a wonderful storm."

Then he referred us to the PR firm.
https://homes.yahoo.com/blogs/spaces/michael-jackson-s-neverland-ranch-hits-market-at--100m-233521574.html
Michael Jackson's Neverland Ranch hits market at $100M
The King of Pop bought Sycamore Valley Ranch in 1988, then transformed it into Neverland.
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https://plus.google.com/105253855092058283218 Apollo farsyker : Ah, +Time Magazine ...never change. 
Ah, +Time Magazine ...never change. 
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-3qoUqU8c-Ic/VWhw3O4KurI/AAAAAAAByXs/eV00ed8il3Y/w506-h750/CGLamkqWIAAnpRA.jpg
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https://plus.google.com/109220763275563718852 Alex Lee : Ah, +Time Magazine ...never change. 
Ah, +Time Magazine ...never change. 
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https://plus.google.com/106528647960817689173 Sean Alexander : Ah, +Time Magazine ...never change. 
Ah, +Time Magazine ...never change. 
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-3qoUqU8c-Ic/VWhw3O4KurI/AAAAAAAByXs/eV00ed8il3Y/w506-h750/CGLamkqWIAAnpRA.jpg
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https://plus.google.com/106633547839120869097 Stacy Tibbits : http://www.buzzfeed.com/ellievhall/19insert-word-here-differences-between-time-magazine-us-and
http://www.buzzfeed.com/ellievhall/19insert-word-here-differences-between-time-magazine-us-and
19 Puzzling Differences Between "Time" Magazine U.S. And International Covers
There may be a reason why Americans don't know very much about international news. The U.S. editions of Time magazine are often a little...different from the ones that go out to the rest of the...
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https://plus.google.com/108257153502707936410 Rachel Palmer : Ah, +Time Magazine ...never change. 
Ah, +Time Magazine ...never change. 
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-3qoUqU8c-Ic/VWhw3O4KurI/AAAAAAAByXs/eV00ed8il3Y/w506-h750/CGLamkqWIAAnpRA.jpg
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