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Most recent 17 results returned for keyword: Puerto Ricans (Search this on MAP)

https://plus.google.com/114992628910939305844 Jose Cora del Valle : Interview with Nelson Denis, Author of War Against All Puerto Ricans: Part I
Interview with Nelson Denis, Author of War Against All Puerto Ricans: Part I
Interview with Nelson Denis, Author of War Against All Puerto Ricans: Part I
Recently, I had the great pleasure of speaking with Nelson Denis, author of War Against All Puerto Ricans. I have long had an interest in the subject of Puerto Rico's 1950 Revolution and whether yo...
3 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/104419594706685045453 Proudly Melanated : My issues with these so called Hebrews aka hyksos is that they consider all Mexicans all Puerto Ricans...
My issues with these so called Hebrews aka hyksos is that they consider all Mexicans all Puerto Ricans Dominicans as equal without going into details and understanding that you have white and Puerto Ricans Dominicans Mexicans then you have the Afro Mexicans Puerto Ricans Dominicans...smdh, these fools just don't get it.
Watch the video: Shakka Ahmose The Hebrew Killer Vs. Hashar & Captain Tazaryah
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/proxy/a3eXnekbNvg2CJmih6KtBaR5SlHQvRqphefO6-cRndo8ruBXni4wCQlfelRHrJ41W9GTnh0fXt4NZQShYECkWQ=w120-h120
http://www.houseofkonsciousness.com
3 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/112378239173694407541 Anthony Redding (Brother Council G) : I think ill run for president and see if i can't get this country back on track first thing ill do is...
I think ill run for president and see if i can't get this country back on track first thing ill do is give all Americans the free businesses and homes so we wont have no homeless and out of work then ill start going thru Congress city and state and law offices And get rid of all the racist And corrupt people And replace them with people who will do things fairly then ill fuck around And break up the whole tea party cause they ain't nothing but the kkk who traded in the sheets for business suits then ill start having factories And such start making things in America instead of other countries building it cause its putting Americans out of work when they have all these other countries build it hell maybe just maybe we can call this the land of the free And land of opportunities again all this bartering And trading with other countries is what wrong also And ill stop us from going over And rebuilding other countries after we bomb the shit out of them cause just like Japan Vietnam etc we went over bombed the shit out of them while stealing all their resources just like Iraq we went over there bombed the shit out them for what for the gold oil And opium cause china owns 90 percent of our debt And what better way to control china with opium cause they use it for everything over there just like Vietnam we had no business over there that was between the north And south Vietnam we went over there and the cia brought back herion addicted alot of soldiers on the shit then had the nerve to say afro Americans puerto ricans and Mexicans done it man we didn't have the planes to fly that shit over here they did ok plus id end wars period cause war is big business cause during time of war there is money to be made thru food gas oil and alot of illegal gun sells oh yeah Brother Council G would definitely expose all their corrupted shit and put all that shit out there that the cia And other government agencies do And all this hate And race violence in law would end too damn it yeah maybe its best i dont run cause id lay all their dirty laundry out there to dry for real they start all this racist shit And violence to distract everyone from the real motives And thats robbing us blind by embezzling all our tax dollars away oh yeah id get on that azz in a heart beat yall lol but hey what i love most about America freedom of mutha fuckin speech And our constitutional rights lol And im out this bitch lol one love all as in one Brother Council G shit i better watch it or they be on my azz next lol 
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-TbQAiOGO88w/VRYeJL2HkmI/AAAAAAAAgEU/Hr399HEdWGY/w506-h750/15%2B-%2B1
4 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/100253735308778846904 Ivan Rosario : A Tale of Two Governors | #WAR AGAINST ALL PUERTO RICANS...
A Tale of Two Governors | #WAR AGAINST ALL PUERTO RICANS...
A Tale of Two Governors
  “Porto Ricans are a heterogenous mass of mongrels incapable of self-government… savages addicted to head-hunting and cannibalism.”                                             – Senator William B....
4 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/118013736485848988069 David Diaz : It is of no surprise to me, to read some of the comments here, specially from Latin descendants, that...
It is of no surprise to me, to read some of the comments here, specially from Latin descendants, that have never been to Puerto Rico.  The struggles that the Americans in the island of Puerto Rico go through, is precisely what makes them want to become a state.  The miss information, first of all, that those who criticize Puerto Rico for the desire to become a state, and to some in the island that have been lied to all their lives, and  still believe, that they can continue to live in the colonial status.  First of all , Puerto Ricans are as American as it can get, they have shown it through out the years. I don't hear any of you complaining because they want to legalize 11 million Illegal Immigrants, but you want to deny that right to the Americans living in that territory. If you are going to talk here and not make sense, then you are wasting your time and everybody els time.
Watch the video: Puerto Rico Voted Now Congress Must Act - Support H.R. 2000
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/proxy/2yhOPH9_p4K2ChLC_yZ3CgvKhy0eV56tPVR4yZQQBMNDnkuVW-56bbL0g2WX9MPUKqpIVEtn2IfioczHH35zkg=w506-h379-n
As recent as April 2010 the U.S. House of Representatives debated and approved legislation (H.R. 2499, the Puerto Rico Democracy Act) for a federally sanctio...
4 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/103323817897535992103 Enrique Rea : Interview with Nelson Denis, Author of War Against All Puerto Ricans: Part I
Interview with Nelson Denis, Author of War Against All Puerto Ricans: Part I
Interview with Nelson Denis, Author of War Against All Puerto Ricans: Part I
Recently, I had the great pleasure of speaking with Nelson Denis, author of War Against All Puerto Ricans. I have long had an interest in the subject of Puerto Rico's 1950 Revolution and whether yo...
4 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/110360895376124773121 Latino Rebels : Interview with Nelson Denis, Author of War Against All Puerto Ricans: Part I
Interview with Nelson Denis, Author of War Against All Puerto Ricans: Part I
Interview with Nelson Denis, Author of War Against All Puerto Ricans: Part I
Recently, I had the great pleasure of speaking with Nelson Denis, author of War Against All Puerto Ricans. I have long had an interest in the subject of Puerto Rico's 1950 Revolution and whether yo...
4 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/116732842507098676509 LUGO : Latino Rebels | Interview with Nelson Denis, Author of War Against All Puerto Ricans: Part I http://...
Latino Rebels | Interview with Nelson Denis, Author of War Against All Puerto Ricans: Part I http://ow.ly/KRmop
Interview with Nelson Denis, Author of War Against All Puerto Ricans: Part I
Recently, I had the great pleasure of speaking with Nelson Denis, author of War Against All Puerto Ricans. I have long had an interest in the subject of Puerto Rico's 1950 Revolution and whether yo...
5 days ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/110360895376124773121 Latino Rebels : Interview with Nelson Denis, Author of War Against All Puerto Ricans, Part II
Interview with Nelson Denis, Author of War Against All Puerto Ricans, Part II
Interview with Nelson Denis, Author of War Against All Puerto Ricans, Part II
You can read Part I of the intreview with Nelson Denis here. JM: Do you feel the close ties between the Puerto Rican independence movement and Castro has hurt the cause? ND: Anything that enabled J...
5 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/109824588359618360498 Ricardo Rivera : FA Tale of Two Governors | WAR AGAINST ALL PUERTO RICANS
FA Tale of Two Governors | WAR AGAINST ALL PUERTO RICANS
A Tale of Two Governors
  “Porto Ricans are a heterogenous mass of mongrels incapable of self-government… savages addicted to head-hunting and cannibalism.”                                             – Senator William B....
5 days ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/114464700553196514622 Dennis R. Hidalgo : Originally posted on WAR AGAINST ALL PUERTO RICANS:  “Porto Ricans are a heterogenous mass of mongrels...
Originally posted on WAR AGAINST ALL PUERTO RICANS:  “Porto Ricans are a heterogenous mass of mongrels incapable of self-government… savages addicted to head-hunting and cannibalism.”                                             – Senator William B.…
A Tale of Two Governors
Reblogged on WordPress.com
6 days ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/111546216107474495690 Eugene Ballard : Seeking porn Puerto ricans
Seeking porn Puerto ricans
7 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/107201584423693067333 Luquillo Taxis : On March 22, 1873, the Maafa (slavery) was abolished in Puerto Rico. However, African people were not...
On March 22, 1873, the Maafa (slavery) was abolished in Puerto Rico.
However, African people were not emancipated. They had to buy their own freedom at whatever price was set by their former enslaver. The law required that the Atlantians (slaves) had to work for another three years for their former enslavers, other people interested in their services, or for the state in order to pay for some compensation!!!
There is little historical understanding that Puerto Rico enslaved people of African descent, and that African people and their descendants helped shape the political institutions of the island. Their contributions to the music, art, language, and heritage became the foundation of Puerto Rican culture.
African history in Puerto Rico initially began with the African freemen who arrived with the Spanish Conquistadors. Juan Garrido, who belonged to Juan Ponce de León's entourage was the first African man to set foot on the island and in the “New World” in 1509. The Spaniards enslaved the Tainos who were the native inhabitants of the island and many of them died as a result of the cruel treatment that they had received. Africa’s people were then forcibly transported to Puerto Rico to work the mines, sugar cane fields and build forts.
According to historian Luis M. Diaz, the largest contingent of Africa’s people came from the Yorubas and Igbos, ethnic groups from Nigeria; and Bantus from the Guineas. The number of Africans in Puerto Rico rose from 1,500 in 1530 to 15,000 by 1555. They were stamped with a hot iron on the forehead, a branding which meant that they were brought to the country legally and prevented their kidnapping. After 1784, the method of hot branding their forehead was suspended.
In 1527, the first major Maafa rebellion occurred in Puerto Rico, as dozen of Atlantians (slaves) fought against the colonist in a brief revolt. Those who escaped retreated to the mountains, where they resided as maroons with surviving Taínos. By 1873, Atlantians had carried out more than twenty revolts, including some of great political importance, such as the Ponce and Vega Baja conspiracies.
Part of the undisputed African legacy on the Puerto Rican culture includes a peculiar speech pattern. Africans people brought to the island spoke "bozal" Spanish, a mixture of Portuguese, Spanish, and Congo. Many Puerto Ricans have the habit of swallowing the "s," and often pronounce the "r" as an "l". This is because in the African tongue there is no "s" or "r" sound.
Puerto Ricans celebrate Emancipation Day throughout the entire island by getting together to sing, eat and learning to dance plena and bomba, as well as studying their history and honoring famous African Puerto Ricans.
On March 22, 1873, the Maafa (slavery) was abolished in Puerto Rico.
However, African people were not emancipated. They had to buy their own freedom at whatever price was set by their former enslaver. The law required that the Atlantians (slaves) had to work for another three years for their former enslavers, other people interested in their services, or for the state in order to pay for some compensation!!!
There is little historical understanding that Puerto Rico enslaved people of African descent, and that African people and their descendents helped shape the political institutions of the island. Their contributions to the music, art, language, and heritage became the foundation of Puerto Rican culture.
African history in Puerto Rico initially began with the African freemen who arrived with the Spanish Conquistadors. Juan Garrido, who belonged to Juan Ponce de León's entourage was the first African man to set foot on the island and in the “New World” in 1509. The Spaniards enslaved the Tainos who were the native inhabitants of the island and many of them died as a result of the cruel treatment that they had received. Africa’s people were then forcibly transported to Puerto Rico to work the mines, sugar cane fields and build forts.
According to historian Luis M. Diaz, the largest contingent of Africa’s people came from the Yorubas and Igbos, ethnic groups from Nigeria; and Bantus from the Guineas. The number of Africans in Puerto Rico rose from 1,500 in 1530 to 15,000 by 1555. They were stamped with a hot iron on the forehead, a branding which meant that they were brought to the country legally and prevented their kidnapping. After 1784, the method of hot branding their forehead was suspended.
In 1527, the first major Maafa rebellion occurred in Puerto Rico, as dozen of Atlantians (slaves) fought against the colonist in a brief revolt. Those who escaped retreated to the mountains, where they resided as maroons with surviving Taínos. By 1873, Atlantians had carried out more than twenty revolts, including some of great political importance, such as the Ponce and Vega Baja conspiracies.
Part of the undisputed African legacy on the Puerto Rican culture includes a peculiar speech pattern. Africans people brought to the island spoke "bozal" Spanish, a mixture of Portuguese, Spanish, and Congo. Many Puerto Ricans have the habit of swallowing the "s," and often pronounce the "r" as an "l". This is because in the African tongue there is no "s" or "r" sound.
Puerto Ricans celebrate Emancipation Day throughout the entire island by getting together to sing, eat and learning to dance plena and bomba, as well as studying their history and honoring famous African Puerto Ricans.



Images (clockwise): Rafael Cordero, known as "The Father of Public Education in Puerto Rico" painted by Francisco Oller; El Velorio "The Wake" (1893) by Francisco Oller; Arturo Alfonso Schomburg; a book; and a scene of African people working in the cane fields.
Images (clockwise): Rafael Cordero, known as "The Father of Public Education in Puerto Rico" painted by Francisco Oller; El Velorio "The Wake" (1893) by Francisco Oller; Arturo Alfonso Schomburg; a book; and a scene of African people working in the cane fields.
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-yGG7XG2tyus/VQ7DNvUfHWI/AAAAAAAAUlo/4wQxH7Tx6_M/w506-h750/10561618_825032454213403_6371494615051095625_n.jpg
7 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/105465914250346426452 Smiley happy (latina) : On March 22, 1873, the Maafa (slavery) was abolished in Puerto Rico. However, African people were not...
On March 22, 1873, the Maafa (slavery) was abolished in Puerto Rico.
However, African people were not emancipated. They had to buy their own freedom at whatever price was set by their former enslaver. The law required that the Atlantians (slaves) had to work for another three years for their former enslavers, other people interested in their services, or for the state in order to pay for some compensation!!!
There is little historical understanding that Puerto Rico enslaved people of African descent, and that African people and their descendants helped shape the political institutions of the island. Their contributions to the music, art, language, and heritage became the foundation of Puerto Rican culture.
African history in Puerto Rico initially began with the African freemen who arrived with the Spanish Conquistadors. Juan Garrido, who belonged to Juan Ponce de León's entourage was the first African man to set foot on the island and in the “New World” in 1509. The Spaniards enslaved the Tainos who were the native inhabitants of the island and many of them died as a result of the cruel treatment that they had received. Africa’s people were then forcibly transported to Puerto Rico to work the mines, sugar cane fields and build forts.
According to historian Luis M. Diaz, the largest contingent of Africa’s people came from the Yorubas and Igbos, ethnic groups from Nigeria; and Bantus from the Guineas. The number of Africans in Puerto Rico rose from 1,500 in 1530 to 15,000 by 1555. They were stamped with a hot iron on the forehead, a branding which meant that they were brought to the country legally and prevented their kidnapping. After 1784, the method of hot branding their forehead was suspended.
In 1527, the first major Maafa rebellion occurred in Puerto Rico, as dozen of Atlantians (slaves) fought against the colonist in a brief revolt. Those who escaped retreated to the mountains, where they resided as maroons with surviving Taínos. By 1873, Atlantians had carried out more than twenty revolts, including some of great political importance, such as the Ponce and Vega Baja conspiracies.
Part of the undisputed African legacy on the Puerto Rican culture includes a peculiar speech pattern. Africans people brought to the island spoke "bozal" Spanish, a mixture of Portuguese, Spanish, and Congo. Many Puerto Ricans have the habit of swallowing the "s," and often pronounce the "r" as an "l". This is because in the African tongue there is no "s" or "r" sound.
Puerto Ricans celebrate Emancipation Day throughout the entire island by getting together to sing, eat and learning to dance plena and bomba, as well as studying their history and honoring famous African Puerto Ricans.
On March 22, 1873, the Maafa (slavery) was abolished in Puerto Rico.
However, African people were not emancipated. They had to buy their own freedom at whatever price was set by their former enslaver. The law required that the Atlantians (slaves) had to work for another three years for their former enslavers, other people interested in their services, or for the state in order to pay for some compensation!!!
There is little historical understanding that Puerto Rico enslaved people of African descent, and that African people and their descendents helped shape the political institutions of the island. Their contributions to the music, art, language, and heritage became the foundation of Puerto Rican culture.
African history in Puerto Rico initially began with the African freemen who arrived with the Spanish Conquistadors. Juan Garrido, who belonged to Juan Ponce de León's entourage was the first African man to set foot on the island and in the “New World” in 1509. The Spaniards enslaved the Tainos who were the native inhabitants of the island and many of them died as a result of the cruel treatment that they had received. Africa’s people were then forcibly transported to Puerto Rico to work the mines, sugar cane fields and build forts.
According to historian Luis M. Diaz, the largest contingent of Africa’s people came from the Yorubas and Igbos, ethnic groups from Nigeria; and Bantus from the Guineas. The number of Africans in Puerto Rico rose from 1,500 in 1530 to 15,000 by 1555. They were stamped with a hot iron on the forehead, a branding which meant that they were brought to the country legally and prevented their kidnapping. After 1784, the method of hot branding their forehead was suspended.
In 1527, the first major Maafa rebellion occurred in Puerto Rico, as dozen of Atlantians (slaves) fought against the colonist in a brief revolt. Those who escaped retreated to the mountains, where they resided as maroons with surviving Taínos. By 1873, Atlantians had carried out more than twenty revolts, including some of great political importance, such as the Ponce and Vega Baja conspiracies.
Part of the undisputed African legacy on the Puerto Rican culture includes a peculiar speech pattern. Africans people brought to the island spoke "bozal" Spanish, a mixture of Portuguese, Spanish, and Congo. Many Puerto Ricans have the habit of swallowing the "s," and often pronounce the "r" as an "l". This is because in the African tongue there is no "s" or "r" sound.
Puerto Ricans celebrate Emancipation Day throughout the entire island by getting together to sing, eat and learning to dance plena and bomba, as well as studying their history and honoring famous African Puerto Ricans.



Images (clockwise): Rafael Cordero, known as "The Father of Public Education in Puerto Rico" painted by Francisco Oller; El Velorio "The Wake" (1893) by Francisco Oller; Arturo Alfonso Schomburg; a book; and a scene of African people working in the cane fields.
Images (clockwise): Rafael Cordero, known as "The Father of Public Education in Puerto Rico" painted by Francisco Oller; El Velorio "The Wake" (1893) by Francisco Oller; Arturo Alfonso Schomburg; a book; and a scene of African people working in the cane fields.
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-yGG7XG2tyus/VQ7DNvUfHWI/AAAAAAAAUlo/4wQxH7Tx6_M/w506-h750/10561618_825032454213403_6371494615051095625_n.jpg
7 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/115180435331156554144 Pedro L. Rivera Sánchez (Pedro Luis) : On March 22, 1873, the Maafa (slavery) was abolished in Puerto Rico. However, African people were not...
On March 22, 1873, the Maafa (slavery) was abolished in Puerto Rico.
However, African people were not emancipated. They had to buy their own freedom at whatever price was set by their former enslaver. The law required that the Atlantians (slaves) had to work for another three years for their former enslavers, other people interested in their services, or for the state in order to pay for some compensation!!!
There is little historical understanding that Puerto Rico enslaved people of African descent, and that African people and their descendants helped shape the political institutions of the island. Their contributions to the music, art, language, and heritage became the foundation of Puerto Rican culture.
African history in Puerto Rico initially began with the African freemen who arrived with the Spanish Conquistadors. Juan Garrido, who belonged to Juan Ponce de León's entourage was the first African man to set foot on the island and in the “New World” in 1509. The Spaniards enslaved the Tainos who were the native inhabitants of the island and many of them died as a result of the cruel treatment that they had received. Africa’s people were then forcibly transported to Puerto Rico to work the mines, sugar cane fields and build forts.
According to historian Luis M. Diaz, the largest contingent of Africa’s people came from the Yorubas and Igbos, ethnic groups from Nigeria; and Bantus from the Guineas. The number of Africans in Puerto Rico rose from 1,500 in 1530 to 15,000 by 1555. They were stamped with a hot iron on the forehead, a branding which meant that they were brought to the country legally and prevented their kidnapping. After 1784, the method of hot branding their forehead was suspended.
In 1527, the first major Maafa rebellion occurred in Puerto Rico, as dozen of Atlantians (slaves) fought against the colonist in a brief revolt. Those who escaped retreated to the mountains, where they resided as maroons with surviving Taínos. By 1873, Atlantians had carried out more than twenty revolts, including some of great political importance, such as the Ponce and Vega Baja conspiracies.
Part of the undisputed African legacy on the Puerto Rican culture includes a peculiar speech pattern. Africans people brought to the island spoke "bozal" Spanish, a mixture of Portuguese, Spanish, and Congo. Many Puerto Ricans have the habit of swallowing the "s," and often pronounce the "r" as an "l". This is because in the African tongue there is no "s" or "r" sound.
Puerto Ricans celebrate Emancipation Day throughout the entire island by getting together to sing, eat and learning to dance plena and bomba, as well as studying their history and honoring famous African Puerto Ricans.
On March 22, 1873, the Maafa (slavery) was abolished in Puerto Rico.
However, African people were not emancipated. They had to buy their own freedom at whatever price was set by their former enslaver. The law required that the Atlantians (slaves) had to work for another three years for their former enslavers, other people interested in their services, or for the state in order to pay for some compensation!!!
There is little historical understanding that Puerto Rico enslaved people of African descent, and that African people and their descendents helped shape the political institutions of the island. Their contributions to the music, art, language, and heritage became the foundation of Puerto Rican culture.
African history in Puerto Rico initially began with the African freemen who arrived with the Spanish Conquistadors. Juan Garrido, who belonged to Juan Ponce de León's entourage was the first African man to set foot on the island and in the “New World” in 1509. The Spaniards enslaved the Tainos who were the native inhabitants of the island and many of them died as a result of the cruel treatment that they had received. Africa’s people were then forcibly transported to Puerto Rico to work the mines, sugar cane fields and build forts.
According to historian Luis M. Diaz, the largest contingent of Africa’s people came from the Yorubas and Igbos, ethnic groups from Nigeria; and Bantus from the Guineas. The number of Africans in Puerto Rico rose from 1,500 in 1530 to 15,000 by 1555. They were stamped with a hot iron on the forehead, a branding which meant that they were brought to the country legally and prevented their kidnapping. After 1784, the method of hot branding their forehead was suspended.
In 1527, the first major Maafa rebellion occurred in Puerto Rico, as dozen of Atlantians (slaves) fought against the colonist in a brief revolt. Those who escaped retreated to the mountains, where they resided as maroons with surviving Taínos. By 1873, Atlantians had carried out more than twenty revolts, including some of great political importance, such as the Ponce and Vega Baja conspiracies.
Part of the undisputed African legacy on the Puerto Rican culture includes a peculiar speech pattern. Africans people brought to the island spoke "bozal" Spanish, a mixture of Portuguese, Spanish, and Congo. Many Puerto Ricans have the habit of swallowing the "s," and often pronounce the "r" as an "l". This is because in the African tongue there is no "s" or "r" sound.
Puerto Ricans celebrate Emancipation Day throughout the entire island by getting together to sing, eat and learning to dance plena and bomba, as well as studying their history and honoring famous African Puerto Ricans.



Images (clockwise): Rafael Cordero, known as "The Father of Public Education in Puerto Rico" painted by Francisco Oller; El Velorio "The Wake" (1893) by Francisco Oller; Arturo Alfonso Schomburg; a book; and a scene of African people working in the cane fields.
Images (clockwise): Rafael Cordero, known as "The Father of Public Education in Puerto Rico" painted by Francisco Oller; El Velorio "The Wake" (1893) by Francisco Oller; Arturo Alfonso Schomburg; a book; and a scene of African people working in the cane fields.
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-yGG7XG2tyus/VQ7DNvUfHWI/AAAAAAAAUlo/4wQxH7Tx6_M/w506-h750/10561618_825032454213403_6371494615051095625_n.jpg
7 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/104539289589191567110 Javier Lugo : On March 22, 1873, the Maafa (slavery) was abolished in Puerto Rico. However, African people were not...
On March 22, 1873, the Maafa (slavery) was abolished in Puerto Rico.
However, African people were not emancipated. They had to buy their own freedom at whatever price was set by their former enslaver. The law required that the Atlantians (slaves) had to work for another three years for their former enslavers, other people interested in their services, or for the state in order to pay for some compensation!!!
There is little historical understanding that Puerto Rico enslaved people of African descent, and that African people and their descendants helped shape the political institutions of the island. Their contributions to the music, art, language, and heritage became the foundation of Puerto Rican culture.
African history in Puerto Rico initially began with the African freemen who arrived with the Spanish Conquistadors. Juan Garrido, who belonged to Juan Ponce de León's entourage was the first African man to set foot on the island and in the “New World” in 1509. The Spaniards enslaved the Tainos who were the native inhabitants of the island and many of them died as a result of the cruel treatment that they had received. Africa’s people were then forcibly transported to Puerto Rico to work the mines, sugar cane fields and build forts.
According to historian Luis M. Diaz, the largest contingent of Africa’s people came from the Yorubas and Igbos, ethnic groups from Nigeria; and Bantus from the Guineas. The number of Africans in Puerto Rico rose from 1,500 in 1530 to 15,000 by 1555. They were stamped with a hot iron on the forehead, a branding which meant that they were brought to the country legally and prevented their kidnapping. After 1784, the method of hot branding their forehead was suspended.
In 1527, the first major Maafa rebellion occurred in Puerto Rico, as dozen of Atlantians (slaves) fought against the colonist in a brief revolt. Those who escaped retreated to the mountains, where they resided as maroons with surviving Taínos. By 1873, Atlantians had carried out more than twenty revolts, including some of great political importance, such as the Ponce and Vega Baja conspiracies.
Part of the undisputed African legacy on the Puerto Rican culture includes a peculiar speech pattern. Africans people brought to the island spoke "bozal" Spanish, a mixture of Portuguese, Spanish, and Congo. Many Puerto Ricans have the habit of swallowing the "s," and often pronounce the "r" as an "l". This is because in the African tongue there is no "s" or "r" sound.
Puerto Ricans celebrate Emancipation Day throughout the entire island by getting together to sing, eat and learning to dance plena and bomba, as well as studying their history and honoring famous African Puerto Ricans.
On March 22, 1873, the Maafa (slavery) was abolished in Puerto Rico.
However, African people were not emancipated. They had to buy their own freedom at whatever price was set by their former enslaver. The law required that the Atlantians (slaves) had to work for another three years for their former enslavers, other people interested in their services, or for the state in order to pay for some compensation!!!
There is little historical understanding that Puerto Rico enslaved people of African descent, and that African people and their descendents helped shape the political institutions of the island. Their contributions to the music, art, language, and heritage became the foundation of Puerto Rican culture.
African history in Puerto Rico initially began with the African freemen who arrived with the Spanish Conquistadors. Juan Garrido, who belonged to Juan Ponce de León's entourage was the first African man to set foot on the island and in the “New World” in 1509. The Spaniards enslaved the Tainos who were the native inhabitants of the island and many of them died as a result of the cruel treatment that they had received. Africa’s people were then forcibly transported to Puerto Rico to work the mines, sugar cane fields and build forts.
According to historian Luis M. Diaz, the largest contingent of Africa’s people came from the Yorubas and Igbos, ethnic groups from Nigeria; and Bantus from the Guineas. The number of Africans in Puerto Rico rose from 1,500 in 1530 to 15,000 by 1555. They were stamped with a hot iron on the forehead, a branding which meant that they were brought to the country legally and prevented their kidnapping. After 1784, the method of hot branding their forehead was suspended.
In 1527, the first major Maafa rebellion occurred in Puerto Rico, as dozen of Atlantians (slaves) fought against the colonist in a brief revolt. Those who escaped retreated to the mountains, where they resided as maroons with surviving Taínos. By 1873, Atlantians had carried out more than twenty revolts, including some of great political importance, such as the Ponce and Vega Baja conspiracies.
Part of the undisputed African legacy on the Puerto Rican culture includes a peculiar speech pattern. Africans people brought to the island spoke "bozal" Spanish, a mixture of Portuguese, Spanish, and Congo. Many Puerto Ricans have the habit of swallowing the "s," and often pronounce the "r" as an "l". This is because in the African tongue there is no "s" or "r" sound.
Puerto Ricans celebrate Emancipation Day throughout the entire island by getting together to sing, eat and learning to dance plena and bomba, as well as studying their history and honoring famous African Puerto Ricans.



Images (clockwise): Rafael Cordero, known as "The Father of Public Education in Puerto Rico" painted by Francisco Oller; El Velorio "The Wake" (1893) by Francisco Oller; Arturo Alfonso Schomburg; a book; and a scene of African people working in the cane fields.
Images (clockwise): Rafael Cordero, known as "The Father of Public Education in Puerto Rico" painted by Francisco Oller; El Velorio "The Wake" (1893) by Francisco Oller; Arturo Alfonso Schomburg; a book; and a scene of African people working in the cane fields.
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On March 22, 1873, the Maafa (slavery) was abolished in Puerto Rico.
However, African people were not emancipated. They had to buy their own freedom at whatever price was set by their former enslaver. The law required that the Atlantians (slaves) had to work for another three years for their former enslavers, other people interested in their services, or for the state in order to pay for some compensation!!!
There is little historical understanding that Puerto Rico enslaved people of African descent, and that African people and their descendants helped shape the political institutions of the island. Their contributions to the music, art, language, and heritage became the foundation of Puerto Rican culture.
African history in Puerto Rico initially began with the African freemen who arrived with the Spanish Conquistadors. Juan Garrido, who belonged to Juan Ponce de León's entourage was the first African man to set foot on the island and in the “New World” in 1509. The Spaniards enslaved the Tainos who were the native inhabitants of the island and many of them died as a result of the cruel treatment that they had received. Africa’s people were then forcibly transported to Puerto Rico to work the mines, sugar cane fields and build forts.
According to historian Luis M. Diaz, the largest contingent of Africa’s people came from the Yorubas and Igbos, ethnic groups from Nigeria; and Bantus from the Guineas. The number of Africans in Puerto Rico rose from 1,500 in 1530 to 15,000 by 1555. They were stamped with a hot iron on the forehead, a branding which meant that they were brought to the country legally and prevented their kidnapping. After 1784, the method of hot branding their forehead was suspended.
In 1527, the first major Maafa rebellion occurred in Puerto Rico, as dozen of Atlantians (slaves) fought against the colonist in a brief revolt. Those who escaped retreated to the mountains, where they resided as maroons with surviving Taínos. By 1873, Atlantians had carried out more than twenty revolts, including some of great political importance, such as the Ponce and Vega Baja conspiracies.
Part of the undisputed African legacy on the Puerto Rican culture includes a peculiar speech pattern. Africans people brought to the island spoke "bozal" Spanish, a mixture of Portuguese, Spanish, and Congo. Many Puerto Ricans have the habit of swallowing the "s," and often pronounce the "r" as an "l". This is because in the African tongue there is no "s" or "r" sound.
Puerto Ricans celebrate Emancipation Day throughout the entire island by getting together to sing, eat and learning to dance plena and bomba, as well as studying their history and honoring famous African Puerto Ricans.
On March 22, 1873, the Maafa (slavery) was abolished in Puerto Rico.
However, African people were not emancipated. They had to buy their own freedom at whatever price was set by their former enslaver. The law required that the Atlantians (slaves) had to work for another three years for their former enslavers, other people interested in their services, or for the state in order to pay for some compensation!!!
There is little historical understanding that Puerto Rico enslaved people of African descent, and that African people and their descendents helped shape the political institutions of the island. Their contributions to the music, art, language, and heritage became the foundation of Puerto Rican culture.
African history in Puerto Rico initially began with the African freemen who arrived with the Spanish Conquistadors. Juan Garrido, who belonged to Juan Ponce de León's entourage was the first African man to set foot on the island and in the “New World” in 1509. The Spaniards enslaved the Tainos who were the native inhabitants of the island and many of them died as a result of the cruel treatment that they had received. Africa’s people were then forcibly transported to Puerto Rico to work the mines, sugar cane fields and build forts.
According to historian Luis M. Diaz, the largest contingent of Africa’s people came from the Yorubas and Igbos, ethnic groups from Nigeria; and Bantus from the Guineas. The number of Africans in Puerto Rico rose from 1,500 in 1530 to 15,000 by 1555. They were stamped with a hot iron on the forehead, a branding which meant that they were brought to the country legally and prevented their kidnapping. After 1784, the method of hot branding their forehead was suspended.
In 1527, the first major Maafa rebellion occurred in Puerto Rico, as dozen of Atlantians (slaves) fought against the colonist in a brief revolt. Those who escaped retreated to the mountains, where they resided as maroons with surviving Taínos. By 1873, Atlantians had carried out more than twenty revolts, including some of great political importance, such as the Ponce and Vega Baja conspiracies.
Part of the undisputed African legacy on the Puerto Rican culture includes a peculiar speech pattern. Africans people brought to the island spoke "bozal" Spanish, a mixture of Portuguese, Spanish, and Congo. Many Puerto Ricans have the habit of swallowing the "s," and often pronounce the "r" as an "l". This is because in the African tongue there is no "s" or "r" sound.
Puerto Ricans celebrate Emancipation Day throughout the entire island by getting together to sing, eat and learning to dance plena and bomba, as well as studying their history and honoring famous African Puerto Ricans.



Images (clockwise): Rafael Cordero, known as "The Father of Public Education in Puerto Rico" painted by Francisco Oller; El Velorio "The Wake" (1893) by Francisco Oller; Arturo Alfonso Schomburg; a book; and a scene of African people working in the cane fields.
Images (clockwise): Rafael Cordero, known as "The Father of Public Education in Puerto Rico" painted by Francisco Oller; El Velorio "The Wake" (1893) by Francisco Oller; Arturo Alfonso Schomburg; a book; and a scene of African people working in the cane fields.
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-yGG7XG2tyus/VQ7DNvUfHWI/AAAAAAAAUlo/4wQxH7Tx6_M/w506-h750/10561618_825032454213403_6371494615051095625_n.jpg
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