Sign in with Twitter Sign in with Facebook

Type the topic in any language to check out real time results of Who's Talking on Social Media Sites


Trending Topics: 競馬実況1001回天龍さん#PopularNorthKoreaFilmsQueen Street#askmattcahillDontre Hamilton#JacobWeAreProudOfYou潤結婚#お風呂にかける時間で女子力が分かる#RetrospectivaClanessaYüceDivana GönderinYolsuzlarıKoreAsiaMovieBlog JumuseyoBlogspotCOM#OQueTeve2014#FOURThingsIWantForChristmasŞefkatÇetin AdaylarıRahatBırakHiçKimseYoksaBile FenerbahçeVar#MakeAComedyScary#bence2015#LouisWeLoveYourVoiceDiego Aguirre#BeyazFutboldaEnUzunGece#WeAreAllNiall#ShortGirlAppreciationDay角膜#paddychristmasVenina#JustinPleaseComeToTurkeyNextTour彦摩呂#EdepYaHuChristmas is in 3SarıkamışDondu YüreklerimizYandıOlhos Nus花男#年末だし名前の由来晒そうぜGeorge SquareSami HyypiaCinderellaTuğçe KazazNew YearsGlasgowOnce Caldas#nana_MSantaNatal突然変異うぉんちゅイヴァンWant Youゆず風呂#EğerNasipOlursa#KSIDXRACERClutha#CowboysWinNFCEastWhatsap 543x674x9231横フェス川畑さんコラボCASBeast ModeMedinaClint ReifIsmaaiyl BrinsleyDe BlasioChampsShailene Woodleynfl scheduledetroit lionsnfl standingsFoot LockerEastbay49erswinter solsticeAaron HernandezSound of MusicDallas CowboysAmy AdamsNFLphiladelphia eaglesAndrew LuckMARSHAWN LYNCHMore

Most recent 20 results returned for keyword: Main Sequence (Search this on MAP)

https://plus.google.com/102914042002225989519 Robert A Dorrough : One of the many dances that go on in main sequence stars.
One of the many dances that go on in main sequence stars.
Watch the video: Choreography of an electron pair
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/proxy/T80zZR24WSmZDxHqcH0u5TxGXzbsmMQoz-QBdwKRJwS6IhXfaCGFOoFHXvY3x1N-G69QFqB0822nbNRt2TR9O9Oi9KE=w506-h379-n
Physicists at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg have filmed the pulsing motion of the electron pair in a helium atom. At 15.3 femtos...
5 hours ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/104148256798921828668 Dustin B : Today's #StarOfTheDay is Tau And (τ And) the 28th brightest star in the constellation Andromeda. It ...
Today's #StarOfTheDay is Tau And (τ And) the 28th brightest star in the constellation Andromeda. It is classified as a regular blue giant star with a mass and radius a couple times larger than the sun. Where this star greatly differs is in its surface temperature which is about 13,000 kelvin, causing its highest intensity emitted wavelengths to be in the ultraviolet realm.

This star also appears to be "on the fence" as to whether it will be in death, a white dwarf or a neutron star. This discrepancy comes as which spectral type interpretation for it is accurate. If it is a type B8III the star will nova and remain as a white dwarf. However if it is a B5III type star it will supernova and the remnants will be a neutron star. It all comes down to temperature, a higher temperature requires greater gravity to collapse the star when it implodes.

Ok so how do these stellar classifications actually work? Let's look at τ And as an example [B8III]:

B - main spectral type, signifies the stars main possible surface temperature range and color. Possible values from hottest to coolest are O, B, A, F, G, K, M. Apparently there are also even cooler star classifications of L, T and Y which I'm sure range from hot Mojave summer day, to lukewarm cup of coffee, they are so cool. The hottest stars radiate in ultraviolet while the coolest stars radiate in infrared.

8 - this is an intermediate temperature scale within the above stellar type. 0 is the hottest, 9 is the coolest. Thus a B5III star is hotter than a B8III star.

III - this is a physical size classification of a star. The star can be a white dwarf (VII), subdwarf (VI), main sequence/dwarf (V), sub giant (IV), giant (III), bright giant (IIb, IIa), supergiant (I) and hypergiant (0). The size is specifically tied to the stars mass, however often as mass goes up linearly the radius of the star tends to go up at least twice as fast or exponentially.

Thus the discrepancy comes in the stars current classification, is it a B5III star or a B8III star? If a B5III there has to be an extinction region surrounding the star obscuring some of the stars light otherwise it's luminosity and distance do not make sense. Common understanding is that this star started off as a B2.5III while it was still fusing hydrogen, but has decreased its light intensity as its swelled to a giant and begun fusing helium.

#Astronomy 
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-fMI0ZMIoaBg/VJej_KSRbKI/AAAAAAAAB1U/I9akxu7HOYg/w506-h750/14%2B-%2B1
12 hours ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/103209156710328195024 Jenny Fernandes : The life cycle of stars - our Sun is currently in its main sequence phase. Via AsapSCIENCE.
The life cycle of stars - our Sun is currently in its main sequence phase. Via AsapSCIENCE.
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-4AjEMhqVM-0/VJWmuZqYINI/AAAAAAAAOZo/rmNlXJbqPGQ/w506-h750/sistema-solar-6-The%2Blife%2Bcycle%2Bof%2Bstars%2B-%2Bour%2BSun%2Bis%2Bcurrently%2Bin%2Bits%2Bmain%2Bsequence%2Bphase.%2BVia%2BAsapSCIENCE.jpg
22 hours ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/109430418990044978440 Miguel Ángel Gómez Martínez : The life cycle of stars - our Sun is currently in its main sequence phase. Via AsapSCIENCE.
The life cycle of stars - our Sun is currently in its main sequence phase. Via AsapSCIENCE.
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-4AjEMhqVM-0/VJWmuZqYINI/AAAAAAAAOZo/rmNlXJbqPGQ/w506-h750/sistema-solar-6-The%2Blife%2Bcycle%2Bof%2Bstars%2B-%2Bour%2BSun%2Bis%2Bcurrently%2Bin%2Bits%2Bmain%2Bsequence%2Bphase.%2BVia%2BAsapSCIENCE.jpg
1 day ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/104148256798921828668 Dustin B : In makeup for Thursday: HR8642 is a main sequence orange giant star in the constellation Pegasus. It...
In makeup for Thursday:

HR8642 is a main sequence orange giant star in the constellation Pegasus. It is slightly cooler than our star but has swelled to a calculated 8.3 to 17x times the radius of our star. The uncertainty of my radius calculation is due to the fact that I could not determine exact surface temperature and had to use the range of K0 type stars.

This star has a galactic orbital angle much different (-159°) to that of our star (26°). #StarOfTheDay #Astronomy 
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-48qByZ4Ga4c/VJYlHmhSPMI/AAAAAAAAB00/LidWx4D0XXw/w506-h750/14%2B-%2B1
1 day ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/102650294312211993312 Olha Ivashkiv : The life cycle of stars - our Sun is currently in its main sequence phase. Via AsapSCIENCE.
The life cycle of stars - our Sun is currently in its main sequence phase. Via AsapSCIENCE.
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-4AjEMhqVM-0/VJWmuZqYINI/AAAAAAAAOZk/C4YtReEAHmI/w506-h750/sistema-solar-6-The%2Blife%2Bcycle%2Bof%2Bstars%2B-%2Bour%2BSun%2Bis%2Bcurrently%2Bin%2Bits%2Bmain%2Bsequence%2Bphase.%2BVia%2BAsapSCIENCE.jpg
1 day ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/112004116071009963288 tony rev : The life cycle of stars - our Sun is currently in its main sequence phase. Via AsapSCIENCE.
The life cycle of stars - our Sun is currently in its main sequence phase. Via AsapSCIENCE.
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-4AjEMhqVM-0/VJWmuZqYINI/AAAAAAAAOZk/C4YtReEAHmI/w506-h750/sistema-solar-6-The%2Blife%2Bcycle%2Bof%2Bstars%2B-%2Bour%2BSun%2Bis%2Bcurrently%2Bin%2Bits%2Bmain%2Bsequence%2Bphase.%2BVia%2BAsapSCIENCE.jpg
1 day ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/106549562957274441076 sarah adem : The life cycle of stars - our Sun is currently in its main sequence phase. Via AsapSCIENCE.
The life cycle of stars - our Sun is currently in its main sequence phase. Via AsapSCIENCE.
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-4AjEMhqVM-0/VJWmuZqYINI/AAAAAAAAOZk/C4YtReEAHmI/w506-h750/sistema-solar-6-The%2Blife%2Bcycle%2Bof%2Bstars%2B-%2Bour%2BSun%2Bis%2Bcurrently%2Bin%2Bits%2Bmain%2Bsequence%2Bphase.%2BVia%2BAsapSCIENCE.jpg
1 day ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/111926870495252698120 Solar System : The life cycle of stars - our Sun is currently in its main sequence phase. Via AsapSCIENCE.
The life cycle of stars - our Sun is currently in its main sequence phase. Via AsapSCIENCE.
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-4AjEMhqVM-0/VJWmuZqYINI/AAAAAAAAOZk/C4YtReEAHmI/w506-h750/sistema-solar-6-The%2Blife%2Bcycle%2Bof%2Bstars%2B-%2Bour%2BSun%2Bis%2Bcurrently%2Bin%2Bits%2Bmain%2Bsequence%2Bphase.%2BVia%2BAsapSCIENCE.jpg
2 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/111926870495252698120 Solar System : The life cycle of stars - our Sun is currently in its main sequence phase. Via AsapSCIENCE.
The life cycle of stars - our Sun is currently in its main sequence phase. Via AsapSCIENCE.
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-4AjEMhqVM-0/VJWmuZqYINI/AAAAAAAAOZk/C4YtReEAHmI/w506-h750/sistema-solar-6-The%2Blife%2Bcycle%2Bof%2Bstars%2B-%2Bour%2BSun%2Bis%2Bcurrently%2Bin%2Bits%2Bmain%2Bsequence%2Bphase.%2BVia%2BAsapSCIENCE.jpg
2 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/111926870495252698120 Solar System : The life cycle of stars - our Sun is currently in its main sequence phase. Via AsapSCIENCE.
The life cycle of stars - our Sun is currently in its main sequence phase. Via AsapSCIENCE.
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-4AjEMhqVM-0/VJWmuZqYINI/AAAAAAAAOZo/rmNlXJbqPGQ/w506-h750/sistema-solar-6-The%2Blife%2Bcycle%2Bof%2Bstars%2B-%2Bour%2BSun%2Bis%2Bcurrently%2Bin%2Bits%2Bmain%2Bsequence%2Bphase.%2BVia%2BAsapSCIENCE.jpg
2 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/103614517748710359147 Johnny Xu : By John P. Millis, Ph.D Red supergiant stars are the largest stars in the Universe by volume (meaning...

By John P. Millis, Ph.D
Red supergiant stars are the largest stars in the Universe by volume (meaning they also have the greatest diameter), however, they are not necessarily - and almost never are - the largest stars by mass.

Creating a Red Supergiant

Main sequence stars remain in hydrostatic equilibrium by converting the hydrogen in their cores into helium through nuclear fusion.

When low and medium mass stars deplete their hydrogen fuel their core begins to collapse, significantly raising the temperature - by nearly an order of magnitude. The energy escaping from the core during this process pushes the outer part of the star outward, forming a red giant.
http://space.about.com/od/stars/a/Red-Supergiant-Stars.htm

2 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/103614517748710359147 Johnny Xu : Red Supergiants A star of 15 solar masses exhausts its hydrogen in about one-thousandth the lifetime...
Red Supergiants
A star of 15 solar masses exhausts its hydrogen in about one-thousandth the lifetime of our sun. It proceeds through the red giant phase, but when it reaches the triple-alpha process of nuclear fusion, it continues to burn for a time and expands to an even larger volume. The much brighter, but still reddened star is called a red supergiant. Betelgeuse, at the shoulder of Orion, is the best-known example. Absolute luminosities may reach -10 magnitude compared to +5 for our sun.
Some of these supergiants are unstable and form the very important Cepheid variables. In their final stages, supergiants may explode into supernovae. The collapse of these massive stars may produce a neutron star or a black hole.
 
 Index
 HyperPhysics*** Astrophysics  R Nave
 Go Back


Betelgeuse
Betelgeuse is a prominent example of a red supergiant star. It is located at the shoulder of Orion. It forms part of the winter triangle seen from North America. Betelgeuse has a luminosity about 10,000 times that of the Sun and its radius is calculated to be about 370 times that of the sun. If it were positioned at the center of our sun, its radius would extend out past the radius of Mars, about 2 astronomical units! Most stars on the main sequence have about the same size as the sun. It has a surface temperature of about 3000 K as determined from its blackbody radiation curve. Betelgeuse is about 310 light years away from the Earth. Its celestial coordinates are RA=5 h 52 m , dec=7° 24' .
 
 
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/astro/redsup.html

Reference Articlefrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Red supergiant star
Red supergiants are supergiant stars of spectral type K-M and a luminosity class of I.
They are the largest stars in the universe in terms of physical size, although they are not the most massive.
Stars with more than about 10 solar masses, after burning their hydrogen become red supergiants during their helium-burning phase.
These stars have very cool surface temperatures (3500-4500 K), and enormous radii.
The four largest known red supergiants in the Galaxy are Mu Cephei, KW Sagitarii, V354 Cephei, and KY Cygni, which all have radii about 1500 times that of the sun (about 7 astronomical units, or 7 times as far as the Earth is from the sun).
The radius of most red giants is between 200 and 800 times that of the sun, which is still enough to reach from the sun to Earth and beyond.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/articles/r/red_supergiant.htm
Red Supergiant Stars
Red Supergiants. A star of 15 solar masses exhausts its hydrogen in about one-thousandth the lifetime of our sun. It proceeds through the red giant phase, but when it reaches the triple-alpha process of nuclear fusion, it continues to burn for a time and expands to an even larger volume.
2 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/111228562557923025118 Mariano Jara Melagrani : Shine One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun...
Shine

One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun is compared to other stars. The Sun appears large to us, but it’s tiny compared to giant stars like Betelgeuse. While this is true, it isn’t the best metric for comparing stars. While Betelgeuse has a diameter 1,000 times that of the Sun, it only has 10 – 20 times the mass. Betelgeuse is much larger than our Sun, but also much less dense. 

Another way to compare stars would be to focus on their mass, or their luminosity. The two are often related, in that more massive stars also tend to be brighter, but that isn’t always the case. It’s true for stable, main sequence stars, but dying or unstable stars can vary wildly.

One of the brightest main sequences stars is Theta Orionis C, which is a blue supergiant in the Orion Nebula. It has a luminosity about 250,000 times the Sun. It has a mass of about 40 solar masses, while being about 8 times the Sun’s diameter. It consumes hydrogen in its core so quickly that it will only remain on the main sequence for a few million years (compared to about 10 billion for a Sun-like star).

The brightest known star in the Milky Way is Eta Carinae, which is an unstable 100 solar mass star with a luminosity of about 5 million Suns. In the past couple centuries Eta Carinae has varied in brightness significantly, ranging in apparent magnitude from 4 to 9, which covers a factor of 1oo in luminosity.

There may be brighter stars in the Milky Way, but one of the challenges to finding them is that many such stars are partly obscured by a surrounding nebula, as is Eta Carinae. Then there is the fact that much of our galaxy is obscured by gas and dust in the galactic plane.

The brightest known star is in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and is known as R136a1. It also happens to be the most massive star, estimated to be about 265 solar masses. This star has a luminosity of 8.7 million Suns. In the artistic rendering above, it is the largest blue star in comparison to the moderately sized yellow Sun.

In terms of size, it is only 35 times larger than the Sun, which is tiny compared to Betelgeuse.  And yet it outshines them all.
Shine - Brian Koberlein
One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun is compared to other stars. The Sun appears large to us, but it's tiny compared to giant stars like Betelgeuse. While this is true, it isn't the best metric for comparing stars. While Betelgeuse has a diameter 1,000 times that of the Sun, it only has 10 - 20 times the mass. Betelgeuse is much larger than our Sun, but also much less dense.
3 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/101303042994572698765 Farvahar Homayoun Ir : Shine One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun...
Shine

One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun is compared to other stars. The Sun appears large to us, but it’s tiny compared to giant stars like Betelgeuse. While this is true, it isn’t the best metric for comparing stars. While Betelgeuse has a diameter 1,000 times that of the Sun, it only has 10 – 20 times the mass. Betelgeuse is much larger than our Sun, but also much less dense. 

Another way to compare stars would be to focus on their mass, or their luminosity. The two are often related, in that more massive stars also tend to be brighter, but that isn’t always the case. It’s true for stable, main sequence stars, but dying or unstable stars can vary wildly.

One of the brightest main sequences stars is Theta Orionis C, which is a blue supergiant in the Orion Nebula. It has a luminosity about 250,000 times the Sun. It has a mass of about 40 solar masses, while being about 8 times the Sun’s diameter. It consumes hydrogen in its core so quickly that it will only remain on the main sequence for a few million years (compared to about 10 billion for a Sun-like star).

The brightest known star in the Milky Way is Eta Carinae, which is an unstable 100 solar mass star with a luminosity of about 5 million Suns. In the past couple centuries Eta Carinae has varied in brightness significantly, ranging in apparent magnitude from 4 to 9, which covers a factor of 1oo in luminosity.

There may be brighter stars in the Milky Way, but one of the challenges to finding them is that many such stars are partly obscured by a surrounding nebula, as is Eta Carinae. Then there is the fact that much of our galaxy is obscured by gas and dust in the galactic plane.

The brightest known star is in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and is known as R136a1. It also happens to be the most massive star, estimated to be about 265 solar masses. This star has a luminosity of 8.7 million Suns. In the artistic rendering above, it is the largest blue star in comparison to the moderately sized yellow Sun.

In terms of size, it is only 35 times larger than the Sun, which is tiny compared to Betelgeuse.  And yet it outshines them all.
Shine - Brian Koberlein
One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun is compared to other stars. The Sun appears large to us, but it's tiny compared to giant stars like Betelgeuse. While this is true, it isn't the best metric for comparing stars. While Betelgeuse has a diameter 1,000 times that of the Sun, it only has 10 - 20 times the mass. Betelgeuse is much larger than our Sun, but also much less dense.
3 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/114845034353806478346 Seun Adekoya : Shine One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun...
Shine

One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun is compared to other stars. The Sun appears large to us, but it’s tiny compared to giant stars like Betelgeuse. While this is true, it isn’t the best metric for comparing stars. While Betelgeuse has a diameter 1,000 times that of the Sun, it only has 10 – 20 times the mass. Betelgeuse is much larger than our Sun, but also much less dense. 

Another way to compare stars would be to focus on their mass, or their luminosity. The two are often related, in that more massive stars also tend to be brighter, but that isn’t always the case. It’s true for stable, main sequence stars, but dying or unstable stars can vary wildly.

One of the brightest main sequences stars is Theta Orionis C, which is a blue supergiant in the Orion Nebula. It has a luminosity about 250,000 times the Sun. It has a mass of about 40 solar masses, while being about 8 times the Sun’s diameter. It consumes hydrogen in its core so quickly that it will only remain on the main sequence for a few million years (compared to about 10 billion for a Sun-like star).

The brightest known star in the Milky Way is Eta Carinae, which is an unstable 100 solar mass star with a luminosity of about 5 million Suns. In the past couple centuries Eta Carinae has varied in brightness significantly, ranging in apparent magnitude from 4 to 9, which covers a factor of 1oo in luminosity.

There may be brighter stars in the Milky Way, but one of the challenges to finding them is that many such stars are partly obscured by a surrounding nebula, as is Eta Carinae. Then there is the fact that much of our galaxy is obscured by gas and dust in the galactic plane.

The brightest known star is in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and is known as R136a1. It also happens to be the most massive star, estimated to be about 265 solar masses. This star has a luminosity of 8.7 million Suns. In the artistic rendering above, it is the largest blue star in comparison to the moderately sized yellow Sun.

In terms of size, it is only 35 times larger than the Sun, which is tiny compared to Betelgeuse.  And yet it outshines them all.
Shine - Brian Koberlein
One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun is compared to other stars. The Sun appears large to us, but it's tiny compared to giant stars like Betelgeuse. While this is true, it isn't the best metric for comparing stars. While Betelgeuse has a diameter 1,000 times that of the Sun, it only has 10 - 20 times the mass. Betelgeuse is much larger than our Sun, but also much less dense.
3 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/110834207903305485564 James Carlson : Shine One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun...
Shine

One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun is compared to other stars. The Sun appears large to us, but it’s tiny compared to giant stars like Betelgeuse. While this is true, it isn’t the best metric for comparing stars. While Betelgeuse has a diameter 1,000 times that of the Sun, it only has 10 – 20 times the mass. Betelgeuse is much larger than our Sun, but also much less dense. 

Another way to compare stars would be to focus on their mass, or their luminosity. The two are often related, in that more massive stars also tend to be brighter, but that isn’t always the case. It’s true for stable, main sequence stars, but dying or unstable stars can vary wildly.

One of the brightest main sequences stars is Theta Orionis C, which is a blue supergiant in the Orion Nebula. It has a luminosity about 250,000 times the Sun. It has a mass of about 40 solar masses, while being about 8 times the Sun’s diameter. It consumes hydrogen in its core so quickly that it will only remain on the main sequence for a few million years (compared to about 10 billion for a Sun-like star).

The brightest known star in the Milky Way is Eta Carinae, which is an unstable 100 solar mass star with a luminosity of about 5 million Suns. In the past couple centuries Eta Carinae has varied in brightness significantly, ranging in apparent magnitude from 4 to 9, which covers a factor of 1oo in luminosity.

There may be brighter stars in the Milky Way, but one of the challenges to finding them is that many such stars are partly obscured by a surrounding nebula, as is Eta Carinae. Then there is the fact that much of our galaxy is obscured by gas and dust in the galactic plane.

The brightest known star is in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and is known as R136a1. It also happens to be the most massive star, estimated to be about 265 solar masses. This star has a luminosity of 8.7 million Suns. In the artistic rendering above, it is the largest blue star in comparison to the moderately sized yellow Sun.

In terms of size, it is only 35 times larger than the Sun, which is tiny compared to Betelgeuse.  And yet it outshines them all.
Shine - Brian Koberlein
One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun is compared to other stars. The Sun appears large to us, but it's tiny compared to giant stars like Betelgeuse. While this is true, it isn't the best metric for comparing stars. While Betelgeuse has a diameter 1,000 times that of the Sun, it only has 10 - 20 times the mass. Betelgeuse is much larger than our Sun, but also much less dense.
3 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/117254210671489427815 Ricky Adams : Shine One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun...
Shine

One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun is compared to other stars. The Sun appears large to us, but it’s tiny compared to giant stars like Betelgeuse. While this is true, it isn’t the best metric for comparing stars. While Betelgeuse has a diameter 1,000 times that of the Sun, it only has 10 – 20 times the mass. Betelgeuse is much larger than our Sun, but also much less dense. 

Another way to compare stars would be to focus on their mass, or their luminosity. The two are often related, in that more massive stars also tend to be brighter, but that isn’t always the case. It’s true for stable, main sequence stars, but dying or unstable stars can vary wildly.

One of the brightest main sequences stars is Theta Orionis C, which is a blue supergiant in the Orion Nebula. It has a luminosity about 250,000 times the Sun. It has a mass of about 40 solar masses, while being about 8 times the Sun’s diameter. It consumes hydrogen in its core so quickly that it will only remain on the main sequence for a few million years (compared to about 10 billion for a Sun-like star).

The brightest known star in the Milky Way is Eta Carinae, which is an unstable 100 solar mass star with a luminosity of about 5 million Suns. In the past couple centuries Eta Carinae has varied in brightness significantly, ranging in apparent magnitude from 4 to 9, which covers a factor of 1oo in luminosity.

There may be brighter stars in the Milky Way, but one of the challenges to finding them is that many such stars are partly obscured by a surrounding nebula, as is Eta Carinae. Then there is the fact that much of our galaxy is obscured by gas and dust in the galactic plane.

The brightest known star is in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and is known as R136a1. It also happens to be the most massive star, estimated to be about 265 solar masses. This star has a luminosity of 8.7 million Suns. In the artistic rendering above, it is the largest blue star in comparison to the moderately sized yellow Sun.

In terms of size, it is only 35 times larger than the Sun, which is tiny compared to Betelgeuse.  And yet it outshines them all.
Shine - Brian Koberlein
One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun is compared to other stars. The Sun appears large to us, but it's tiny compared to giant stars like Betelgeuse. While this is true, it isn't the best metric for comparing stars. While Betelgeuse has a diameter 1,000 times that of the Sun, it only has 10 - 20 times the mass. Betelgeuse is much larger than our Sun, but also much less dense.
3 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/111268670388876439841 S. John : Shine One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun...
Shine

One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun is compared to other stars. The Sun appears large to us, but it’s tiny compared to giant stars like Betelgeuse. While this is true, it isn’t the best metric for comparing stars. While Betelgeuse has a diameter 1,000 times that of the Sun, it only has 10 – 20 times the mass. Betelgeuse is much larger than our Sun, but also much less dense. 

Another way to compare stars would be to focus on their mass, or their luminosity. The two are often related, in that more massive stars also tend to be brighter, but that isn’t always the case. It’s true for stable, main sequence stars, but dying or unstable stars can vary wildly.

One of the brightest main sequences stars is Theta Orionis C, which is a blue supergiant in the Orion Nebula. It has a luminosity about 250,000 times the Sun. It has a mass of about 40 solar masses, while being about 8 times the Sun’s diameter. It consumes hydrogen in its core so quickly that it will only remain on the main sequence for a few million years (compared to about 10 billion for a Sun-like star).

The brightest known star in the Milky Way is Eta Carinae, which is an unstable 100 solar mass star with a luminosity of about 5 million Suns. In the past couple centuries Eta Carinae has varied in brightness significantly, ranging in apparent magnitude from 4 to 9, which covers a factor of 1oo in luminosity.

There may be brighter stars in the Milky Way, but one of the challenges to finding them is that many such stars are partly obscured by a surrounding nebula, as is Eta Carinae. Then there is the fact that much of our galaxy is obscured by gas and dust in the galactic plane.

The brightest known star is in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and is known as R136a1. It also happens to be the most massive star, estimated to be about 265 solar masses. This star has a luminosity of 8.7 million Suns. In the artistic rendering above, it is the largest blue star in comparison to the moderately sized yellow Sun.

In terms of size, it is only 35 times larger than the Sun, which is tiny compared to Betelgeuse.  And yet it outshines them all.
Shine - Brian Koberlein
One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun is compared to other stars. The Sun appears large to us, but it's tiny compared to giant stars like Betelgeuse. While this is true, it isn't the best metric for comparing stars. While Betelgeuse has a diameter 1,000 times that of the Sun, it only has 10 - 20 times the mass. Betelgeuse is much larger than our Sun, but also much less dense.
3 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/113378597561113867306 Philipp Kessler : Shine One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun...
Shine

One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun is compared to other stars. The Sun appears large to us, but it’s tiny compared to giant stars like Betelgeuse. While this is true, it isn’t the best metric for comparing stars. While Betelgeuse has a diameter 1,000 times that of the Sun, it only has 10 – 20 times the mass. Betelgeuse is much larger than our Sun, but also much less dense. 

Another way to compare stars would be to focus on their mass, or their luminosity. The two are often related, in that more massive stars also tend to be brighter, but that isn’t always the case. It’s true for stable, main sequence stars, but dying or unstable stars can vary wildly.

One of the brightest main sequences stars is Theta Orionis C, which is a blue supergiant in the Orion Nebula. It has a luminosity about 250,000 times the Sun. It has a mass of about 40 solar masses, while being about 8 times the Sun’s diameter. It consumes hydrogen in its core so quickly that it will only remain on the main sequence for a few million years (compared to about 10 billion for a Sun-like star).

The brightest known star in the Milky Way is Eta Carinae, which is an unstable 100 solar mass star with a luminosity of about 5 million Suns. In the past couple centuries Eta Carinae has varied in brightness significantly, ranging in apparent magnitude from 4 to 9, which covers a factor of 1oo in luminosity.

There may be brighter stars in the Milky Way, but one of the challenges to finding them is that many such stars are partly obscured by a surrounding nebula, as is Eta Carinae. Then there is the fact that much of our galaxy is obscured by gas and dust in the galactic plane.

The brightest known star is in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and is known as R136a1. It also happens to be the most massive star, estimated to be about 265 solar masses. This star has a luminosity of 8.7 million Suns. In the artistic rendering above, it is the largest blue star in comparison to the moderately sized yellow Sun.

In terms of size, it is only 35 times larger than the Sun, which is tiny compared to Betelgeuse.  And yet it outshines them all.
Shine - Brian Koberlein
One of the popular astronomy facts that gets passed around every so often is how small our Sun is compared to other stars. The Sun appears large to us, but it's tiny compared to giant stars like Betelgeuse. While this is true, it isn't the best metric for comparing stars. While Betelgeuse has a diameter 1,000 times that of the Sun, it only has 10 - 20 times the mass. Betelgeuse is much larger than our Sun, but also much less dense.
3 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -