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Most recent 20 results returned for keyword: Main Sequence (Search this on MAP)

https://plus.google.com/105238481171981241810 LITTLE JIMMY : Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous...
Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope
In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous star AG Carinae—otherwise known as HD 94910—takes center stage. Found within the constellation of Carina in the southern sky, AG Carinae lies 20 000 light-years away, nestled in the Milky Way.

AG Carinae is classified as a Luminous Blue Variable. These rare objects are massive evolved stars that will one day become Wolf-Rayet Stars—a class of stars that are tens of thousands to several million times as luminous as the Sun. They have evolved from main sequence stars that were twenty times the mass of the Sun.

Stars like AG Carinae lose their mass at a phenomenal rate. This loss of mass is due to powerful stellar winds with speeds of up to 7 million km/hour. These powerful winds are also responsible for the shroud of material visible in this image. The winds exert enormous pressure on the clouds of interstellar material expelled by the star and force them into this shape.

Despite HD 94910’s intense luminosity, it is not visible with the naked eye as much of its output is in the ultraviolet.

This image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), that was installed on Hubble during the Shuttle mission STS-61 and was Hubble’s workhorse for many years. It is worth noting that the bright glare at the center of the image is not the star itself. The star is tiny at this scale and hidden within the saturated region. The white cross is also not an astronomical phenomenon but rather an effect of the telescope.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

+Hubble Space Telescope 
+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA #Space #Hubble #Telescope #Star #AGCarinae #Luminous #Blue #Variable #HD94910 #Carina #Cosmos #Universe
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-K4ZA4-8LcV8/VCmhOPInncI/AAAAAAACDjo/BIi5P17fSTw/w506-h750/potw1439a.tif
33 minutes ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/118048094693755326864 Khalid AAM : Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous...
Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope
In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous star AG Carinae—otherwise known as HD 94910—takes center stage. Found within the constellation of Carina in the southern sky, AG Carinae lies 20 000 light-years away, nestled in the Milky Way.

AG Carinae is classified as a Luminous Blue Variable. These rare objects are massive evolved stars that will one day become Wolf-Rayet Stars—a class of stars that are tens of thousands to several million times as luminous as the Sun. They have evolved from main sequence stars that were twenty times the mass of the Sun.

Stars like AG Carinae lose their mass at a phenomenal rate. This loss of mass is due to powerful stellar winds with speeds of up to 7 million km/hour. These powerful winds are also responsible for the shroud of material visible in this image. The winds exert enormous pressure on the clouds of interstellar material expelled by the star and force them into this shape.

Despite HD 94910’s intense luminosity, it is not visible with the naked eye as much of its output is in the ultraviolet.

This image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), that was installed on Hubble during the Shuttle mission STS-61 and was Hubble’s workhorse for many years. It is worth noting that the bright glare at the center of the image is not the star itself. The star is tiny at this scale and hidden within the saturated region. The white cross is also not an astronomical phenomenon but rather an effect of the telescope.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

+Hubble Space Telescope 
+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA #Space #Hubble #Telescope #Star #AGCarinae #Luminous #Blue #Variable #HD94910 #Carina #Cosmos #Universe
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-K4ZA4-8LcV8/VCmhOPInncI/AAAAAAACDjo/BIi5P17fSTw/w506-h750/potw1439a.tif
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https://plus.google.com/106128435767764643028 Arm Murali : Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous...
Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope
In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous star AG Carinae—otherwise known as HD 94910—takes center stage. Found within the constellation of Carina in the southern sky, AG Carinae lies 20 000 light-years away, nestled in the Milky Way.

AG Carinae is classified as a Luminous Blue Variable. These rare objects are massive evolved stars that will one day become Wolf-Rayet Stars—a class of stars that are tens of thousands to several million times as luminous as the Sun. They have evolved from main sequence stars that were twenty times the mass of the Sun.

Stars like AG Carinae lose their mass at a phenomenal rate. This loss of mass is due to powerful stellar winds with speeds of up to 7 million km/hour. These powerful winds are also responsible for the shroud of material visible in this image. The winds exert enormous pressure on the clouds of interstellar material expelled by the star and force them into this shape.

Despite HD 94910’s intense luminosity, it is not visible with the naked eye as much of its output is in the ultraviolet.

This image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), that was installed on Hubble during the Shuttle mission STS-61 and was Hubble’s workhorse for many years. It is worth noting that the bright glare at the center of the image is not the star itself. The star is tiny at this scale and hidden within the saturated region. The white cross is also not an astronomical phenomenon but rather an effect of the telescope.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

+Hubble Space Telescope 
+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA #Space #Hubble #Telescope #Star #AGCarinae #Luminous #Blue #Variable #HD94910 #Carina #Cosmos #Universe
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-K4ZA4-8LcV8/VCmhOPInncI/AAAAAAACDjo/BIi5P17fSTw/w506-h750/potw1439a.tif
8 hours ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/103216674245293362459 Peter Gale : The coolest stars. One way that stars are categorized is by temperature. Since the temperature of a ...
The coolest stars.
One way that stars are categorized is by temperature. Since the temperature of a star can determine its visual color, this category scheme is known as spectral type. The main categories of spectral type are M, K, G, F, A, B, and O. The coolest stars (red dwarfs) being M, and the hottest stars being O. Our own Sun is a G star.
Red dwarfs are small stars in terms of their mass. Large red dwarfs have a mass have about half the mass of our Sun, but they can be as small as 0.075 solar masses (a bit more than 78 Jupiter masses). Below that, and a star simply doesn't have enough mass to fuse hydrogen in its core. Since hydrogen is the most abundant element, and its fusion is the main source of energy for a star, this means an object with less than about 78 Jupiter masses isn't able to produce energy the way main-sequence stars do. You might think, then, that this marks a clear line of demarcation between planets and stars. Anything above about 78 Jupiter masses is a star, and anything below that mass is a planet. But it turns out things aren't quite so clear.
A star with a mass less than 78 Jupiters is often referred to as a brown dwarf. They are sometimes referred to as "failed stars", but this is a bit of a misnomer. While brown dwarfs are too small to fuse hydrogen, they still can fuse other elements. If a brown dwarf is larger than 65 Jupiter masses, it can fuse lithium. If it is larger than about 13 Jupiter masses it can fuse deuterium (which is a less common variation of hydrogen that has a proton and a neutron, rather than just a proton).
The largest brown dwarfs can have surface temperatures as high as 2,800 K. While this is about half the surface temperature of the Sun (5,800 K), it would still appear very star-like to the casual observer. In fact hot brown dwarfs can be difficult to distinguish from cool red dwarfs. One way to tell them apart is to look for lithium in their atmosphere. Red dwarfs, because they can fuse hydrogen, also fuse most of their lithium early on (a process known as lithium depletion). Brown dwarfs, on the other hand, are never active enough to fuse most of their lithium, so it is still present in their atmospheres.
Because brown dwarfs can't fuse common hydrogen, they never produce enough energy to keep their temperatures high. So as brown dwarfs age, they cool down. Since stars are categorized by their temperatures, this means brown dwarfs change category as they age.
The warmest brown dwarfs can be in the cool end of the M category, but the first true brown dwarf category are L dwarfs. These have surface temperatures of about 1,300 K – 2,000 K. They are cool enough that lithium and other alkali metals are present in their atmosphere. Below the L category are T dwarfs, with surface temperatures of about 700 K – 1,300 K. These are brightest in the near infrared, and are cool enough for methane and other molecules to build up in their atmosphere.
But even the T class dwarfs are not the coolest stars. Recently the WISE infrared telescope discovered six very cool brown dwarf stars. Since they all have temperatures less than 600 K, they are placed in a new spectral type known as Y dwarfs. The coolest of these has an atmospheric temperature of only 300 K, or about room temperature.
You might think a star with an atmospheric temperature you could comfortably lounge in should hardly be called a star, and there are astronomers who would agree with you. They certainly would appear much more like Jupiter than the Sun.
Because of their extremely low temperature, the Y dwarf spectral type is a bit controversial. But these Y-dwarf stars do appear to be larger than the minimum 13 Jupiter masses necessary to fuse deuterium, and if we use fusion as a defining character they would technically be stars. That would make them the coolest stars.
Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-09-coolest-stars.html#jCp

Picture Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-m92uCyTkH2Y/VCrK6vdfmCI/AAAAAAAADDs/uVMVAVygSko/w506-h750/thecoolestst.jpg
8 hours ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/104370384359997793421 kevin Paul Jeater : Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous...
Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope
In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous star AG Carinae—otherwise known as HD 94910—takes center stage. Found within the constellation of Carina in the southern sky, AG Carinae lies 20 000 light-years away, nestled in the Milky Way.

AG Carinae is classified as a Luminous Blue Variable. These rare objects are massive evolved stars that will one day become Wolf-Rayet Stars—a class of stars that are tens of thousands to several million times as luminous as the Sun. They have evolved from main sequence stars that were twenty times the mass of the Sun.

Stars like AG Carinae lose their mass at a phenomenal rate. This loss of mass is due to powerful stellar winds with speeds of up to 7 million km/hour. These powerful winds are also responsible for the shroud of material visible in this image. The winds exert enormous pressure on the clouds of interstellar material expelled by the star and force them into this shape.

Despite HD 94910’s intense luminosity, it is not visible with the naked eye as much of its output is in the ultraviolet.

This image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), that was installed on Hubble during the Shuttle mission STS-61 and was Hubble’s workhorse for many years. It is worth noting that the bright glare at the center of the image is not the star itself. The star is tiny at this scale and hidden within the saturated region. The white cross is also not an astronomical phenomenon but rather an effect of the telescope.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

+Hubble Space Telescope 
+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA #Space #Hubble #Telescope #Star #AGCarinae #Luminous #Blue #Variable #HD94910 #Carina #Cosmos #Universe
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-K4ZA4-8LcV8/VCmhOPInncI/AAAAAAACDjo/BIi5P17fSTw/w506-h750/potw1439a.tif
9 hours ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/112081415191693698406 Chotima Charnvorawongse : Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous...
Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope
In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous star AG Carinae—otherwise known as HD 94910—takes center stage. Found within the constellation of Carina in the southern sky, AG Carinae lies 20 000 light-years away, nestled in the Milky Way.

AG Carinae is classified as a Luminous Blue Variable. These rare objects are massive evolved stars that will one day become Wolf-Rayet Stars—a class of stars that are tens of thousands to several million times as luminous as the Sun. They have evolved from main sequence stars that were twenty times the mass of the Sun.

Stars like AG Carinae lose their mass at a phenomenal rate. This loss of mass is due to powerful stellar winds with speeds of up to 7 million km/hour. These powerful winds are also responsible for the shroud of material visible in this image. The winds exert enormous pressure on the clouds of interstellar material expelled by the star and force them into this shape.

Despite HD 94910’s intense luminosity, it is not visible with the naked eye as much of its output is in the ultraviolet.

This image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), that was installed on Hubble during the Shuttle mission STS-61 and was Hubble’s workhorse for many years. It is worth noting that the bright glare at the center of the image is not the star itself. The star is tiny at this scale and hidden within the saturated region. The white cross is also not an astronomical phenomenon but rather an effect of the telescope.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

+Hubble Space Telescope 
+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA #Space #Hubble #Telescope #Star #AGCarinae #Luminous #Blue #Variable #HD94910 #Carina #Cosmos #Universe
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-K4ZA4-8LcV8/VCmhOPInncI/AAAAAAACDjo/BIi5P17fSTw/w506-h750/potw1439a.tif
10 hours ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/109236237248996593996 Eng. Sulieman : Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous...
Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope
In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous star AG Carinae—otherwise known as HD 94910—takes center stage. Found within the constellation of Carina in the southern sky, AG Carinae lies 20 000 light-years away, nestled in the Milky Way.

AG Carinae is classified as a Luminous Blue Variable. These rare objects are massive evolved stars that will one day become Wolf-Rayet Stars—a class of stars that are tens of thousands to several million times as luminous as the Sun. They have evolved from main sequence stars that were twenty times the mass of the Sun.

Stars like AG Carinae lose their mass at a phenomenal rate. This loss of mass is due to powerful stellar winds with speeds of up to 7 million km/hour. These powerful winds are also responsible for the shroud of material visible in this image. The winds exert enormous pressure on the clouds of interstellar material expelled by the star and force them into this shape.

Despite HD 94910’s intense luminosity, it is not visible with the naked eye as much of its output is in the ultraviolet.

This image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), that was installed on Hubble during the Shuttle mission STS-61 and was Hubble’s workhorse for many years. It is worth noting that the bright glare at the center of the image is not the star itself. The star is tiny at this scale and hidden within the saturated region. The white cross is also not an astronomical phenomenon but rather an effect of the telescope.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

+Hubble Space Telescope 
+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA #Space #Hubble #Telescope #Star #AGCarinae #Luminous #Blue #Variable #HD94910 #Carina #Cosmos #Universe
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-K4ZA4-8LcV8/VCmhOPInncI/AAAAAAACDjo/BIi5P17fSTw/w506-h750/potw1439a.tif
11 hours ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/109608568418112196399 BRN DVL : Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous...
Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope
In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous star AG Carinae—otherwise known as HD 94910—takes center stage. Found within the constellation of Carina in the southern sky, AG Carinae lies 20 000 light-years away, nestled in the Milky Way.

AG Carinae is classified as a Luminous Blue Variable. These rare objects are massive evolved stars that will one day become Wolf-Rayet Stars—a class of stars that are tens of thousands to several million times as luminous as the Sun. They have evolved from main sequence stars that were twenty times the mass of the Sun.

Stars like AG Carinae lose their mass at a phenomenal rate. This loss of mass is due to powerful stellar winds with speeds of up to 7 million km/hour. These powerful winds are also responsible for the shroud of material visible in this image. The winds exert enormous pressure on the clouds of interstellar material expelled by the star and force them into this shape.

Despite HD 94910’s intense luminosity, it is not visible with the naked eye as much of its output is in the ultraviolet.

This image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), that was installed on Hubble during the Shuttle mission STS-61 and was Hubble’s workhorse for many years. It is worth noting that the bright glare at the center of the image is not the star itself. The star is tiny at this scale and hidden within the saturated region. The white cross is also not an astronomical phenomenon but rather an effect of the telescope.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

+Hubble Space Telescope 
+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA #Space #Hubble #Telescope #Star #AGCarinae #Luminous #Blue #Variable #HD94910 #Carina #Cosmos #Universe
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-K4ZA4-8LcV8/VCmhOPInncI/AAAAAAACDjo/BIi5P17fSTw/w506-h750/potw1439a.tif
21 hours ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/104957350987257090919 Samir Patil : Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous...
Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope
In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous star AG Carinae—otherwise known as HD 94910—takes center stage. Found within the constellation of Carina in the southern sky, AG Carinae lies 20 000 light-years away, nestled in the Milky Way.

AG Carinae is classified as a Luminous Blue Variable. These rare objects are massive evolved stars that will one day become Wolf-Rayet Stars—a class of stars that are tens of thousands to several million times as luminous as the Sun. They have evolved from main sequence stars that were twenty times the mass of the Sun.

Stars like AG Carinae lose their mass at a phenomenal rate. This loss of mass is due to powerful stellar winds with speeds of up to 7 million km/hour. These powerful winds are also responsible for the shroud of material visible in this image. The winds exert enormous pressure on the clouds of interstellar material expelled by the star and force them into this shape.

Despite HD 94910’s intense luminosity, it is not visible with the naked eye as much of its output is in the ultraviolet.

This image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), that was installed on Hubble during the Shuttle mission STS-61 and was Hubble’s workhorse for many years. It is worth noting that the bright glare at the center of the image is not the star itself. The star is tiny at this scale and hidden within the saturated region. The white cross is also not an astronomical phenomenon but rather an effect of the telescope.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

+Hubble Space Telescope 
+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA #Space #Hubble #Telescope #Star #AGCarinae #Luminous #Blue #Variable #HD94910 #Carina #Cosmos #Universe
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-K4ZA4-8LcV8/VCmhOPInncI/AAAAAAACDjo/BIi5P17fSTw/w506-h750/potw1439a.tif
22 hours ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/118279624468812265049 Marcio Augusto : Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous...
Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope
In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous star AG Carinae—otherwise known as HD 94910—takes center stage. Found within the constellation of Carina in the southern sky, AG Carinae lies 20 000 light-years away, nestled in the Milky Way.

AG Carinae is classified as a Luminous Blue Variable. These rare objects are massive evolved stars that will one day become Wolf-Rayet Stars—a class of stars that are tens of thousands to several million times as luminous as the Sun. They have evolved from main sequence stars that were twenty times the mass of the Sun.

Stars like AG Carinae lose their mass at a phenomenal rate. This loss of mass is due to powerful stellar winds with speeds of up to 7 million km/hour. These powerful winds are also responsible for the shroud of material visible in this image. The winds exert enormous pressure on the clouds of interstellar material expelled by the star and force them into this shape.

Despite HD 94910’s intense luminosity, it is not visible with the naked eye as much of its output is in the ultraviolet.

This image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), that was installed on Hubble during the Shuttle mission STS-61 and was Hubble’s workhorse for many years. It is worth noting that the bright glare at the center of the image is not the star itself. The star is tiny at this scale and hidden within the saturated region. The white cross is also not an astronomical phenomenon but rather an effect of the telescope.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

+Hubble Space Telescope 
+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA #Space #Hubble #Telescope #Star #AGCarinae #Luminous #Blue #Variable #HD94910 #Carina #Cosmos #Universe
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-K4ZA4-8LcV8/VCmhOPInncI/AAAAAAACDjo/BIi5P17fSTw/w506-h750/potw1439a.tif
1 day ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/104283716436707532350 Angela Gonzalez : Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous...
Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope
In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous star AG Carinae—otherwise known as HD 94910—takes center stage. Found within the constellation of Carina in the southern sky, AG Carinae lies 20 000 light-years away, nestled in the Milky Way.

AG Carinae is classified as a Luminous Blue Variable. These rare objects are massive evolved stars that will one day become Wolf-Rayet Stars—a class of stars that are tens of thousands to several million times as luminous as the Sun. They have evolved from main sequence stars that were twenty times the mass of the Sun.

Stars like AG Carinae lose their mass at a phenomenal rate. This loss of mass is due to powerful stellar winds with speeds of up to 7 million km/hour. These powerful winds are also responsible for the shroud of material visible in this image. The winds exert enormous pressure on the clouds of interstellar material expelled by the star and force them into this shape.

Despite HD 94910’s intense luminosity, it is not visible with the naked eye as much of its output is in the ultraviolet.

This image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), that was installed on Hubble during the Shuttle mission STS-61 and was Hubble’s workhorse for many years. It is worth noting that the bright glare at the center of the image is not the star itself. The star is tiny at this scale and hidden within the saturated region. The white cross is also not an astronomical phenomenon but rather an effect of the telescope.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

+Hubble Space Telescope 
+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA #Space #Hubble #Telescope #Star #AGCarinae #Luminous #Blue #Variable #HD94910 #Carina #Cosmos #Universe
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-K4ZA4-8LcV8/VCmhOPInncI/AAAAAAACDjo/BIi5P17fSTw/w506-h750/potw1439a.tif
1 day ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/114224294496665512354 André D'Freitas : Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous...
Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope
In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous star AG Carinae—otherwise known as HD 94910—takes center stage. Found within the constellation of Carina in the southern sky, AG Carinae lies 20 000 light-years away, nestled in the Milky Way.

AG Carinae is classified as a Luminous Blue Variable. These rare objects are massive evolved stars that will one day become Wolf-Rayet Stars—a class of stars that are tens of thousands to several million times as luminous as the Sun. They have evolved from main sequence stars that were twenty times the mass of the Sun.

Stars like AG Carinae lose their mass at a phenomenal rate. This loss of mass is due to powerful stellar winds with speeds of up to 7 million km/hour. These powerful winds are also responsible for the shroud of material visible in this image. The winds exert enormous pressure on the clouds of interstellar material expelled by the star and force them into this shape.

Despite HD 94910’s intense luminosity, it is not visible with the naked eye as much of its output is in the ultraviolet.

This image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), that was installed on Hubble during the Shuttle mission STS-61 and was Hubble’s workhorse for many years. It is worth noting that the bright glare at the center of the image is not the star itself. The star is tiny at this scale and hidden within the saturated region. The white cross is also not an astronomical phenomenon but rather an effect of the telescope.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

+Hubble Space Telescope 
+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA #Space #Hubble #Telescope #Star #AGCarinae #Luminous #Blue #Variable #HD94910 #Carina #Cosmos #Universe
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-K4ZA4-8LcV8/VCmhOPInncI/AAAAAAACDjo/BIi5P17fSTw/w506-h750/potw1439a.tif
1 day ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/113170339523195882863 Dwayne Lawrence : Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous...
Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope
In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous star AG Carinae—otherwise known as HD 94910—takes center stage. Found within the constellation of Carina in the southern sky, AG Carinae lies 20 000 light-years away, nestled in the Milky Way.

AG Carinae is classified as a Luminous Blue Variable. These rare objects are massive evolved stars that will one day become Wolf-Rayet Stars—a class of stars that are tens of thousands to several million times as luminous as the Sun. They have evolved from main sequence stars that were twenty times the mass of the Sun.

Stars like AG Carinae lose their mass at a phenomenal rate. This loss of mass is due to powerful stellar winds with speeds of up to 7 million km/hour. These powerful winds are also responsible for the shroud of material visible in this image. The winds exert enormous pressure on the clouds of interstellar material expelled by the star and force them into this shape.

Despite HD 94910’s intense luminosity, it is not visible with the naked eye as much of its output is in the ultraviolet.

This image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), that was installed on Hubble during the Shuttle mission STS-61 and was Hubble’s workhorse for many years. It is worth noting that the bright glare at the center of the image is not the star itself. The star is tiny at this scale and hidden within the saturated region. The white cross is also not an astronomical phenomenon but rather an effect of the telescope.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

+Hubble Space Telescope 
+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA #Space #Hubble #Telescope #Star #AGCarinae #Luminous #Blue #Variable #HD94910 #Carina #Cosmos #Universe
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-K4ZA4-8LcV8/VCmhOPInncI/AAAAAAACDjo/BIi5P17fSTw/w506-h750/potw1439a.tif
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https://plus.google.com/102340001827748168506 Lawrence Telea : Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous...
Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope
In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous star AG Carinae—otherwise known as HD 94910—takes center stage. Found within the constellation of Carina in the southern sky, AG Carinae lies 20 000 light-years away, nestled in the Milky Way.

AG Carinae is classified as a Luminous Blue Variable. These rare objects are massive evolved stars that will one day become Wolf-Rayet Stars—a class of stars that are tens of thousands to several million times as luminous as the Sun. They have evolved from main sequence stars that were twenty times the mass of the Sun.

Stars like AG Carinae lose their mass at a phenomenal rate. This loss of mass is due to powerful stellar winds with speeds of up to 7 million km/hour. These powerful winds are also responsible for the shroud of material visible in this image. The winds exert enormous pressure on the clouds of interstellar material expelled by the star and force them into this shape.

Despite HD 94910’s intense luminosity, it is not visible with the naked eye as much of its output is in the ultraviolet.

This image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), that was installed on Hubble during the Shuttle mission STS-61 and was Hubble’s workhorse for many years. It is worth noting that the bright glare at the center of the image is not the star itself. The star is tiny at this scale and hidden within the saturated region. The white cross is also not an astronomical phenomenon but rather an effect of the telescope.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

+Hubble Space Telescope 
+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA #Space #Hubble #Telescope #Star #AGCarinae #Luminous #Blue #Variable #HD94910 #Carina #Cosmos #Universe
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-K4ZA4-8LcV8/VCmhOPInncI/AAAAAAACDjo/BIi5P17fSTw/w506-h750/potw1439a.tif
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https://plus.google.com/109967701300832233297 Tomas Mikuckis : Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous...
Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope
In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous star AG Carinae—otherwise known as HD 94910—takes center stage. Found within the constellation of Carina in the southern sky, AG Carinae lies 20 000 light-years away, nestled in the Milky Way.

AG Carinae is classified as a Luminous Blue Variable. These rare objects are massive evolved stars that will one day become Wolf-Rayet Stars—a class of stars that are tens of thousands to several million times as luminous as the Sun. They have evolved from main sequence stars that were twenty times the mass of the Sun.

Stars like AG Carinae lose their mass at a phenomenal rate. This loss of mass is due to powerful stellar winds with speeds of up to 7 million km/hour. These powerful winds are also responsible for the shroud of material visible in this image. The winds exert enormous pressure on the clouds of interstellar material expelled by the star and force them into this shape.

Despite HD 94910’s intense luminosity, it is not visible with the naked eye as much of its output is in the ultraviolet.

This image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), that was installed on Hubble during the Shuttle mission STS-61 and was Hubble’s workhorse for many years. It is worth noting that the bright glare at the center of the image is not the star itself. The star is tiny at this scale and hidden within the saturated region. The white cross is also not an astronomical phenomenon but rather an effect of the telescope.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

+Hubble Space Telescope 
+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA #Space #Hubble #Telescope #Star #AGCarinae #Luminous #Blue #Variable #HD94910 #Carina #Cosmos #Universe
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-K4ZA4-8LcV8/VCmhOPInncI/AAAAAAACDjo/BIi5P17fSTw/w506-h750/potw1439a.tif
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https://plus.google.com/110588015661364910847 Sandra Castro : Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous...
Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope
In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous star AG Carinae—otherwise known as HD 94910—takes center stage. Found within the constellation of Carina in the southern sky, AG Carinae lies 20 000 light-years away, nestled in the Milky Way.

AG Carinae is classified as a Luminous Blue Variable. These rare objects are massive evolved stars that will one day become Wolf-Rayet Stars—a class of stars that are tens of thousands to several million times as luminous as the Sun. They have evolved from main sequence stars that were twenty times the mass of the Sun.

Stars like AG Carinae lose their mass at a phenomenal rate. This loss of mass is due to powerful stellar winds with speeds of up to 7 million km/hour. These powerful winds are also responsible for the shroud of material visible in this image. The winds exert enormous pressure on the clouds of interstellar material expelled by the star and force them into this shape.

Despite HD 94910’s intense luminosity, it is not visible with the naked eye as much of its output is in the ultraviolet.

This image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), that was installed on Hubble during the Shuttle mission STS-61 and was Hubble’s workhorse for many years. It is worth noting that the bright glare at the center of the image is not the star itself. The star is tiny at this scale and hidden within the saturated region. The white cross is also not an astronomical phenomenon but rather an effect of the telescope.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

+Hubble Space Telescope 
+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA #Space #Hubble #Telescope #Star #AGCarinae #Luminous #Blue #Variable #HD94910 #Carina #Cosmos #Universe
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-K4ZA4-8LcV8/VCmhOPInncI/AAAAAAACDjo/BIi5P17fSTw/w506-h750/potw1439a.tif
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https://plus.google.com/113741194727095099640 Heyókȟa The Lakota : Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous...
Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope
In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous star AG Carinae—otherwise known as HD 94910—takes center stage. Found within the constellation of Carina in the southern sky, AG Carinae lies 20 000 light-years away, nestled in the Milky Way.

AG Carinae is classified as a Luminous Blue Variable. These rare objects are massive evolved stars that will one day become Wolf-Rayet Stars—a class of stars that are tens of thousands to several million times as luminous as the Sun. They have evolved from main sequence stars that were twenty times the mass of the Sun.

Stars like AG Carinae lose their mass at a phenomenal rate. This loss of mass is due to powerful stellar winds with speeds of up to 7 million km/hour. These powerful winds are also responsible for the shroud of material visible in this image. The winds exert enormous pressure on the clouds of interstellar material expelled by the star and force them into this shape.

Despite HD 94910’s intense luminosity, it is not visible with the naked eye as much of its output is in the ultraviolet.

This image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), that was installed on Hubble during the Shuttle mission STS-61 and was Hubble’s workhorse for many years. It is worth noting that the bright glare at the center of the image is not the star itself. The star is tiny at this scale and hidden within the saturated region. The white cross is also not an astronomical phenomenon but rather an effect of the telescope.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

+Hubble Space Telescope 
+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA #Space #Hubble #Telescope #Star #AGCarinae #Luminous #Blue #Variable #HD94910 #Carina #Cosmos #Universe
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-K4ZA4-8LcV8/VCmhOPInncI/AAAAAAACDjo/BIi5P17fSTw/w506-h750/potw1439a.tif
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https://plus.google.com/111779718396943768823 RAKESH SRIVASTAVA : Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous...
Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope
In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous star AG Carinae—otherwise known as HD 94910—takes center stage. Found within the constellation of Carina in the southern sky, AG Carinae lies 20 000 light-years away, nestled in the Milky Way.

AG Carinae is classified as a Luminous Blue Variable. These rare objects are massive evolved stars that will one day become Wolf-Rayet Stars—a class of stars that are tens of thousands to several million times as luminous as the Sun. They have evolved from main sequence stars that were twenty times the mass of the Sun.

Stars like AG Carinae lose their mass at a phenomenal rate. This loss of mass is due to powerful stellar winds with speeds of up to 7 million km/hour. These powerful winds are also responsible for the shroud of material visible in this image. The winds exert enormous pressure on the clouds of interstellar material expelled by the star and force them into this shape.

Despite HD 94910’s intense luminosity, it is not visible with the naked eye as much of its output is in the ultraviolet.

This image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), that was installed on Hubble during the Shuttle mission STS-61 and was Hubble’s workhorse for many years. It is worth noting that the bright glare at the center of the image is not the star itself. The star is tiny at this scale and hidden within the saturated region. The white cross is also not an astronomical phenomenon but rather an effect of the telescope.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

+Hubble Space Telescope 
+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA #Space #Hubble #Telescope #Star #AGCarinae #Luminous #Blue #Variable #HD94910 #Carina #Cosmos #Universe
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-K4ZA4-8LcV8/VCmhOPInncI/AAAAAAACDjo/BIi5P17fSTw/w506-h750/potw1439a.tif
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https://plus.google.com/103940824136799098430 Pavel Georgiev : Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous...
Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope
In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous star AG Carinae—otherwise known as HD 94910—takes center stage. Found within the constellation of Carina in the southern sky, AG Carinae lies 20 000 light-years away, nestled in the Milky Way.

AG Carinae is classified as a Luminous Blue Variable. These rare objects are massive evolved stars that will one day become Wolf-Rayet Stars—a class of stars that are tens of thousands to several million times as luminous as the Sun. They have evolved from main sequence stars that were twenty times the mass of the Sun.

Stars like AG Carinae lose their mass at a phenomenal rate. This loss of mass is due to powerful stellar winds with speeds of up to 7 million km/hour. These powerful winds are also responsible for the shroud of material visible in this image. The winds exert enormous pressure on the clouds of interstellar material expelled by the star and force them into this shape.

Despite HD 94910’s intense luminosity, it is not visible with the naked eye as much of its output is in the ultraviolet.

This image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), that was installed on Hubble during the Shuttle mission STS-61 and was Hubble’s workhorse for many years. It is worth noting that the bright glare at the center of the image is not the star itself. The star is tiny at this scale and hidden within the saturated region. The white cross is also not an astronomical phenomenon but rather an effect of the telescope.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

+Hubble Space Telescope 
+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA #Space #Hubble #Telescope #Star #AGCarinae #Luminous #Blue #Variable #HD94910 #Carina #Cosmos #Universe
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-K4ZA4-8LcV8/VCmhOPInncI/AAAAAAACDjo/BIi5P17fSTw/w506-h750/potw1439a.tif
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https://plus.google.com/103700775307068452751 Jim Lea : Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous...
Snapshot of a shedding star | Hubble Space Telescope
In this new Hubble image, the strikingly luminous star AG Carinae—otherwise known as HD 94910—takes center stage. Found within the constellation of Carina in the southern sky, AG Carinae lies 20 000 light-years away, nestled in the Milky Way.

AG Carinae is classified as a Luminous Blue Variable. These rare objects are massive evolved stars that will one day become Wolf-Rayet Stars—a class of stars that are tens of thousands to several million times as luminous as the Sun. They have evolved from main sequence stars that were twenty times the mass of the Sun.

Stars like AG Carinae lose their mass at a phenomenal rate. This loss of mass is due to powerful stellar winds with speeds of up to 7 million km/hour. These powerful winds are also responsible for the shroud of material visible in this image. The winds exert enormous pressure on the clouds of interstellar material expelled by the star and force them into this shape.

Despite HD 94910’s intense luminosity, it is not visible with the naked eye as much of its output is in the ultraviolet.

This image was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), that was installed on Hubble during the Shuttle mission STS-61 and was Hubble’s workhorse for many years. It is worth noting that the bright glare at the center of the image is not the star itself. The star is tiny at this scale and hidden within the saturated region. The white cross is also not an astronomical phenomenon but rather an effect of the telescope.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

+Hubble Space Telescope 
+European Space Agency, ESA 
+NASA Goddard 
+Space Telescope Science Institute 

#NASA #Space #Hubble #Telescope #Star #AGCarinae #Luminous #Blue #Variable #HD94910 #Carina #Cosmos #Universe
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-K4ZA4-8LcV8/VCmhOPInncI/AAAAAAACDjo/BIi5P17fSTw/w506-h750/potw1439a.tif
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