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Most recent 20 results returned for keyword: Jamie Dimon (Search this on MAP)

https://plus.google.com/116085560145447758608 Nithya Desai : http://ow.ly/VZfX300yVzo #archis #businesssolutions - #outsourced #services for #BFSI sector Banks Fight...
http://ow.ly/VZfX300yVzo
#archis
#businesssolutions - #outsourced #services for #BFSI sector
Banks Fight Back
By Shephali Bhatt
Here's how the banking industry is trying to deal with the flurry of payment wallets aka tech disuptors.
Clocking less than 3% of the market at pres ent, yet FinTech has rattled a lot of banking institutions world over.
Little else can explain Jamie Dimon, CEO of JPMorgan telling his shareholders: “They (FinTech) all want to eat our lunch. Every single one of them is going to try.“ While a lot of FinTech startups are collaborating with banks, Dimon is right because a significant section does intend to compete with banks and makes no bones about it either.
The Times Group
The Times Of India daily ePaper - Watch digital ePaper of India from around the world.
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https://plus.google.com/103732963790573285112 Althéa :

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon: Yes, tech will kill some jobs. But slowing tech down is the wrong answer. | david.bellaiche@althea-groupe.com
"There are downsides to flying — people die every now and then. Do you want to stop all air flights?"
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https://plus.google.com/112016502530523402062 YourOffice-Ballantyne : .@jpmorgan CEO Jamie Dimon: Tech kills some jobs, but it makes everybody richer over time. http://on...
.@jpmorgan CEO Jamie Dimon: Tech kills some jobs, but it makes everybody richer over time. http://on.recode.net/1OJvrWD via @Recode
JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon: Yes, tech will kill some jobs. But slowing tech down is the wrong answer.
"There are downsides to flying — people die every now and then. Do you want to stop all air flights?"
2 days ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/110265359970078478607 Hugo Toledo : Seeing as Jamie Dimon publicly acknowledged the pressure "Silicon Valley" solutions are exerting on ...
Seeing as Jamie Dimon publicly acknowledged the pressure "Silicon Valley" solutions are exerting on traditional financial firms business models, I believe this article is likely worth reading.

Enjoy!
How Blockchain Technology Will Disrupt Financial Services Firms - Knowledge@Wharton
Blockchain technology is starting to impact every aspect of business and government. And it begins with the financial services industry.
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https://plus.google.com/112223852052381423567 Pervasive Path Consulting : Yes, tech will kill some jobs, but slowing tech down is the wrong answer. So says J.P. Morgan CEO Jamie...
Yes, tech will kill some jobs, but slowing tech down is the wrong answer. So says J.P. Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon.
JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon: Yes, tech will kill some jobs. But slowing tech down is the wrong answer.
"There are downsides to flying — people die every now and then. Do you want to stop all air flights?"
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https://plus.google.com/104789737606202116941 Tina Bouman : Helen Chaitman-Big Bank Customers Destroyed in Next Economic Meltdown: JP Morgan Chase And The U.S. ...
Helen Chaitman-Big Bank Customers Destroyed in Next Economic Meltdown: JP Morgan Chase And The U.S. Bank Secrecy Act.

PoliticalVelCraft: https://politicalvelcraft.org/2016/05/26/helen-chaitman-big-bank-customers-destroyed-in-next-economic-meltdown-jp-morgan-chase-and-the-u-s-bank-secrecy-act/

May 26, 2016

(via https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-Me2f5Eh4w)

Helen Davis Chaitman was the lead attorney representing the victims of the $65 billion Bernie Madoff scam.

Madoff had help from JP Morgan Chase Bank, and what she found out was stunning. Chaitman explains,

“JP Morgan Chase was the subject of a criminal complaint . . . it was charged with a criminal violation of the Bank Secrecy Act, which is a felony violation. JP Morgan Chase disgorged a small percentage of the profits it made on the Madoff relationship, and the government called it quits. Nobody was fired. Nobody disgorged bonuses, they just went on doing other crimes.”

The Bank Secrecy Act of 1970 (or BSA, or otherwise known as the Currency and Foreign Transactions Reporting Act) requires financial institutions in the United States to assist U.S. government agencies to detect and prevent money laundering.

Chaitman, who wrote a book called “JP Madoff,” documented that JP Morgan Chase paid nearly $36 billion in fines for various crimes just in the last four years.

Chaitman says all the big banks are basically criminal organizations, and “all of them regularly engage in fraud.” Chaitman also says,

“I could have written this book about HSBC, Bank of America or Citi Group. All the banks, and the government encourages them to do this, all of the banks have been operating like criminal enterprises. . . . The bankers have become such criminals it threatens the entire world economy.”

A key component in the Madoff fraud was Madoff never bought securities for his victims even though he claimed he did. The client statements were bogus, and Chaitman says JP Morgan Chase knew about the fraud for years.

Chaitman contends,

“Madoff had a group of people, a small group of people, who were grossly over compensated, who would just make up the statements after the fact.

They had no securities. They had no stocks. They just had pieces of paper saying they had stocks. . . . Madoff never bought the stocks. He just kept all the money, and in fact, that’s why JP Morgan liked him as a customer.

He kept on depositing billions of dollars, and JP Morgan Chase was free to use that money for its own purposes.”

Why no jail time for the management at JP Morgan Chase for a slam dunk criminal fraud?

Chaitman says, “We have a President who doesn’t believe criminal bankers belong in jail, and he appointed an attorney general, Eric Holder, who had this nonsensical rationalization that the banks were too big to put in jail.

Breakdown

In other words, JP Morgan Chase, America’s biggest bank, who does business with 50% of American households, and 80% of fortune 500 companies, should keep all the criminal bankers because we would not be able to operate without them.”

Chaitman says JP Morgan Chase alone has paid fines for multiple crimes and frauds. Chaitman explains:

1. They have admitted to violating the foreign exchange rules.
2. They pled guilty to a felony with respect to that. . . .
3. They have defrauded veterans.
4. They have defrauded credit card holders.
5. They have defrauded homeowners.
6. There is no group of customers they won’t defraud if they can enhance their profits.
7. Yes, in the last four years alone, they have disgorged $36 billion as settlements of charges brought with respect to all these violations.

Chaitman says the $36 billion in fines is just a fraction of the profit JP Morgan Chase is making by committing various frauds.

Chaitman says, “If you look at their financial statements, they are generating huge profits.

That’s why everyone loves Jamie Dimon, but a lot of people loved Carlo Gambino too. (Dimon reportedly has a net worth of $1 billion.)

Chaitman contends the big banks are like mobsters.

Chaitman says,

“There is no question about it. They operate illegally because they can generate huge profits by doing so. They go from one crime to another, and when they get caught committing one crime, nobody gets fired. Nobody disgorges bonuses. They just take those people and put them in a new area where they haven’t yet been prosecuted.”

What will happen to the customers of the big banks in the next financial meltdown? Chaitman warns, “The customers will be destroyed, and if the banks still have enough money to buy Washington, the government will protect them just like it has since 2008.”
Watch the video: Helen Chaitman-Big Bank Customers Destroyed in Next Economic Meltdown
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Attorney Helen Chaitman, who represents victims of the Bernie Madoff $65 billion fraud, contends the big banks are like mobsters. Chaitman says, “There is no...
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https://plus.google.com/103803150290271688627 Tommy Flores : Chaitman says the $36 billion in fines is just a fraction of the profit JP Morgan Chase is making by...
Chaitman says the $36 billion in fines is just a fraction of the profit JP Morgan Chase is making by committing various frauds. Chaitman says, “If you look at their financial statements, they are generating huge profits. That’s why everyone loves Jamie Dimon, but a lot of people loved Carlo Gambino too. (Dimon reportedly has a net worth of $1 billion.)
Criminal Bankers Threaten Entire World Economy -Helen Chaitman & Greg Hunter Video | Banksters
By Greg Hunter’s USAWatchdog.com Helen Davis Chaitman was the lead attorney representing the victims of the $65 billion Bernie Madoff scam. Madoff had help form JP Morgan Chase Bank, and what she found out was stunning. Chaitman explains, “JP Morgan...
3 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/106301878265312432153 Thomas Carter : “Silicon Valley is coming,” JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon warned in his annual letter to shareholders...
“Silicon Valley is coming,” JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon warned in his annual letter to shareholders. He said startups are coming for Wall Street, innovating and creating efficiency in areas that are important to companies such as JPMorgan, particularly in the lending and payments space. #fintech #startup #equityround #capvalue #blockchain
Blockchain Technology Will Disrupt Big Banks, Financial Industry
Blockchain Technology - Arvind Krishna, senior vice president of IBM Research, believes that in the long run, this technology could
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https://plus.google.com/113302242391503824009 1Bitcoin Daily : “Bitcoin the currency, I think, is going to go nowhere … the blockchain is a technology which we've ...
“Bitcoin the currency, I think, is going to go nowhere … the blockchain is a technology which we've been studying and yes it's real.” —Jamie Dimon on ...
1bitcoindaily.com/blog/wait-what-is-blockchain/

7 days ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/111170678677315549900 Ec1 Partners : Great interview with JPMorgan Chase's Jamie Dimon on 'What is the future of finance? Will Silicon Valley...
Great interview with JPMorgan Chase's Jamie Dimon on 'What is the future of finance? Will Silicon Valley challenge Wall Street? And, can China build global banks?' http://goo.gl/hd2vn2
Jamie Dimon on Finance: ‘Who Owns the Future?’
In a rare all-access interview, the head of JPMorgan Chase sits down with Bloomberg’s editor-in-chief.
7 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/102815404548112657523 SILVESTERONKWARE NYAMONGO : Four “Too Big to Fail/Jail” Banks Threaten to Hold Back Funds to Democrats Over Elizabeth Warren Michael...
Four “Too Big to Fail/Jail” Banks Threaten to Hold Back Funds to Democrats Over Elizabeth Warren

Michael Krieger | Mar 30, 2015

Having already proven that their institutions are above the law in the aftermath of the financial crisis, executives at the “Too Big to Fail and Jail” banks have decided it’s time to teach Senate Democrats a lesson.

Not being content with trillions in taxpayer backed bailouts to protect and further consolidate virtually all wealth within their oligarch fiefdoms, these bankers are irate at the notion that a commoner would dare criticize their unassailable crony privilege.

However, the worst part of this story, is that while Warren is harsher than most of her completely bought and paid for colleagues, she is still pretty meek when it comes to the big bank oligopoly.

In her most misguided position, she doesn’t even support an audit of the largest organized crime institution operating within these United States, the Federal Reserve.

Oh and for those of you who will claim the Fed is already audited, think again.

Read: The Fed Impedes GAO Audits by Destroying Source Documents.

Thus it seems even Warren’s meager push for reform is simply too much for the thin skinned bailout baby banks to handle.

From The Hill:

Four major banks are threatening to withhold campaign donations to Senate Democrats in anger over Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s (D-Mass.) attacks on Wall Street.

Representatives from financial powerhouses Citigroup, JPMorgan, Goldman Sachs and Bank of America recently met in Washington and discussed the growing hostility towards big business within the Democratic ranks, according to a Reuters report Friday.

Bank officials cited Warren and Senate Banking Committee ranking member Sherrod Brown (Ohio) as the two main lawmakers leading the charge against them.

But the banks have not agreed on how to respond together, with each firm making its own decision on donations, Reuters reported.

Naturally, leading the charge is the biggest financial welfare recipient, monstrosity of them all: Citigroup.

Citigroup representatives said their firm is already withholding donations to the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) to avoid boosting Warren and other progressives critical of Wall Street.

JPMorgan, meanwhile, has so far given Democrats only a third of its annual contribution. Sources there said company representatives have urged Democrats to soften their attacks on the financial sector.

The bank has typically donated one lump sum in past years.

Yves Smith at Naked Capitalism had some interesting thoughts on the matter:

As much as the Warren attack might not seem like much of a victory, it’s important to understand what she and the other bank opponents are achieving.

The banks count on the public not understanding and not caring about the more arcane aspects of finance, and furthermore assuming that bank reform is settled.

On the political front, the power of the financiers doesn’t lie simply with their lavish campaign donations; it also lies in the perception that opposing them is a political death sentence.

The Administration (remember that Obama is still very much the party leader) again got too clever by half. It decided to exploit Warren as a major fundraiser.

But that gave her an independent power base.

And given the carnage in the Congressional midterms, the wisdom of following Democratic party dictates isn’t looking too hot for individual Congresscritters, unless they hail from conservative districts.

The public is waking up to the party’s limousine liberalism, and voters who care about economic fairness are increasingly staying home on election days.

What Wall Street wants is one hundred Chucky Schumers in the Senate.

To see what I mean, simply read this very interesting article published by the New York Times in 2008 titled: A Champion of Wall Street Reaps Benefits.

Here are some choice excerpts to give you an idea of exactly what a good Wall Street lackey looks like:

WASHINGTON — As the financial crisis jolted the nation in September, Senator Charles E. Schumer was consumed.

He traded telephone calls with bankers, then became one of the first officials to promote a Wall Street bailout.

He spent hours in closed-door briefings and a weekend helping Congressional leaders nail down details of the $700 billion rescue package.

The next day, Mr. Schumer appeared at a breakfast fund-raiser in Midtown Manhattan for Senate Democrats.

Addressing Henry R. Kravis, the buyout billionaire, and about 20 other finance industry executives, he warned that a bailout would be a hard sell on Capitol Hill.

Then he offered some reassurance:

The businessmen could count on the Democrats to help steer the nation through the financial turmoil.

“We are not going to be a bunch of crazy, anti-business liberals,” one executive said, summarizing Mr. Schumer’s remarks.

“We are going to be effective, moderate advocates for sound economic policies, good responsible stewards you can trust.”

The message clearly resonated.

The next week, executives at firms represented at the breakfast sent in more than $135,000 in campaign donations.

But Mr. Schumer, a member of the Banking and Finance Committees, repeatedly took other steps to protect industry players from government oversight and tougher rules, a review of his record shows.

Over the years, he has also helped save financial institutions billions of dollars in higher taxes or fees.

He succeeded in limiting efforts to regulate credit-rating agencies, for example, sponsored legislation that cut fees paid by Wall Street firms to finance government oversight, pushed to allow banks to have lower capital reserves and called for the revision of regulations to make corporations’ balance sheets more transparent.

While Mr. Schumer has taken some pro-consumer stances, his critics fault him for tilting too far toward Wall Street in balancing his responsibilities.

“He is serving the parochial interest of a very small group of financial people, bankers, investment bankers, fund managers, private equity firms, rather than serving the general public,” said John C. Bogle, the founder and former chairman of the Vanguard Group, the giant mutual fund house.

“It has hurt the American investor first and the average American taxpayer.”

Mr. Schumer became a magnet for campaign donations from wealthy industry executives, including Jamie Dimon, now the chief executive of JPMorgan Chase; John J. Mack, the chief executive at Morgan Stanley; and Charles O. Prince III, the former chief executive of Citigroup.

And he was not at all reluctant to ask them for more.

As a result, he has collected over his career more in campaign contributions from the securities and investment industry than any of his peers in Congress, with the exception of Senator John F. Kerry of Massachusetts, the Democratic nominee for president in 2004, according to the Center for Responsive Politics, which analyzed federal data.

(By 2005, Mr. Schumer had so much cash in reserve that he shut down his fund-raising efforts.)

Lee A. Pickard, a lawyer representing clients including the Bank of New York, whose employees have been significant donors to Mr. Schumer and other Senate Democrats, turned to Mr. Schumer last year to successfully beat back a regulatory initiative by the Securities and Exchange Commission.

“If you get Chuck Schumer on your side, you are O.K.,” he said.

Richard Y. Roberts, a former S.E.C. commissioner, said the amendment Mr. Schumer won was troubling, adding that it could block the S.E.C. from punishing a credit-rating agency that consistently issued unreliable ratings.

Sean J. Egan, managing director of a small Pennsylvania agency, Egan-Jones Ratings, and a proponent of the tougher regulations, was more blunt.

“The bill was eviscerated,” he said. “You have stripped away basic safeguards for the investors.”

At times in Congress, Mr. Schumer has teamed up with Republicans, like former Senator Phil Gramm of Texas, who aggressively promoted a free-market agenda.

Mr. Schumer pushed for the Gramm-Leach-Bliley law, passed in November 1999, which knocked down the walls between investment banks and commercial banks and allowed financial supermarkets to flourish.

The law also weakened regulatory oversight by fracturing it among different agencies.

In 2001, Mr. Schumer and Mr. Gramm jointly proposed legislation that would cut fees paid by Wall Street firms and others to the S.E.C. in half, or by $14 billion, over the coming decade.

Their proposal included some extra money for salaries of commission employees.

Mr. Schumer’s argument prevailed, and the fee cut passed overwhelmingly.

“He built his career in large part based on his ties to Wall Street,” said Christopher Whalen, managing director of Institutional Risk Analytics, which advises investors on the regulatory system.

“And he has given the Street what it wanted.”

And he is seeking some regulatory concessions for some Wall Street supporters.

He has proposed, for example, that the government lift a cap on how big the giant banks can get, an issue important to institutions like JPMorgan Chase.

Lifting the cap would allow the biggest banks to absorb weaker ones, but it would also limit competition and increase the risks to the financial system posed by failure of one of the giants.

Wow, this guy is even more shameless than I thought.

Mr. Schumer is also calling for the adoption of European-style regulations that impose far fewer rules and instead require banks to meet certain performance standards, a system institutions generally prefer but some banking experts criticize as not rigorous enough.

In recent weeks, Mr. Schumer has listened to Wall Street leaders for advice on what should come next.

At a dinner at Morgan Stanley’s headquarters the night before the presidential election, John Mack, the chief executive, and a dozen top hedge fund officials talked with Mr. Schumer about possible changes affecting their industry.

Read that again. In late 2008, as the U.S. economy was on fire, Chucky Schumer was busy asking the arsonists what to do next. Needless to say, they got what they wanted.

It now becomes crystal clear why Schumer is the likely successor to Harry Reid as the Democratic leader in the Senate.

He’s been a very loyal puppy dog to Wall Street.

http://libertyblitzkrieg.com/2015/03/30/four-too-big-to-failjail-banks-threaten-to-hold-back-funds-to-democrats-over-elizabeth-warren/#more-22651
Four "Too Big to Fail/Jail" Banks Threaten to Hold Back Funds to Democrats Over Elizabeth Warren
Having already proven that their institutions are above the law in the aftermath of the financial crisis, executives at the "Too Big to Fail and Jail" banks have decided it's time to teach Senate D...
7 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/105386440612185125957 Rightways Tan : Still, fintech is not to be taken lightly. Top bankers themselves are speaking of its imminent threat...
Still, fintech is not to be taken lightly. Top bankers themselves are speaking of its imminent threat to their business. Former Barclays CEO Anthony Jenkins referred to it as banking’s “Uber moment” to describe technological advances that could see bank branches close down and people laid off.

Last April, Jamie Dimon the CEO of the US’ largest bank JP Morgan in his letter to shareholders warned that “Silicon Valley is coming.” “There are hundreds of start-ups with a lot of brains and money working on various alternatives to traditional banking,” Dimon wrote.

On the home front, just last month prominent banker Datuk Seri Nazir Razak echoed such views. Speaking at the Star Media Group’s PowerTalk: Business Series held at Menara Star, Nazir opined that fintech companies are disrupting banking.

“Bankers must respond to this Uber moment. People actually dislike banks today, since the global financial crisis. Recent data suggests that in the US, the cost of banking intermediation has not changed for 100 years in real terms. This simply means banks have not gotten more efficient over the years, so its right that banks get attacked by ‘Silicon Valley’, which has identified banking as an industry that is very ‘ripe’ or juicy to disrupt.”
Fintech - disruptive technology
http://www.thestar.com.my/business/business-news/2016/05/21/fintech-disruptive-technology/ Businesses are embracing it by coming up with their innovations and startups A BUZZWORD growing in popularity in the financial world...
9 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/115636995222526079560 Richard Tan : Businesses are embracing it by coming up with their innovations and startups A BUZZWORD growing in ...
Businesses are embracing it by coming up with their innovations and startups

A BUZZWORD growing in popularity in the financial world today is “fintech”, short for financial technology, which in a nutshell refers to the use of technology to deliver faster and cheaper financial services.

Going by some predications, fintech could take a big chunk of business away from traditional banks as it is being run by smaller more nimble start-ups. But the debate is still out there as to how much that chunk will be. In Malaysia in particular, fintech’s presence is still nascent and small. Fintech transactions totalled a mere US$6.37mil this year compared with a global figure of US$769.3bil, according to Statista, an online statistics provider.

It however predicts that fintech transaction values to grow to US$14.4bil by 2020. A significant number of fintech companies, especially those in the digital payments space, actually work alongside local banks.

Still, fintech is not to be taken lightly. Top bankers themselves are speaking of its imminent threat to their business. Former Barclays CEO Anthony Jenkins referred to it as banking’s “Uber moment” to describe technological advances that could see bank branches close down and people laid off.

Last April, Jamie Dimon the CEO of the US’ largest bank JP Morgan in his letter to shareholders warned that “Silicon Valley is coming.” “There are hundreds of start-ups with a lot of brains and money working on various alternatives to traditional banking,” Dimon wrote.

On the home front, just last month prominent banker Datuk Seri Nazir Razak echoed such views. Speaking at the Star Media Group’s PowerTalk: Business Series held at Menara Star, Nazir opined that fintech companies are disrupting banking.

“Bankers must respond to this Uber moment. People actually dislike banks today, since the global financial crisis. Recent data suggests that in the US, the cost of banking intermediation has not changed for 100 years in real terms. This simply means banks have not gotten more efficient over the years, so its right that banks get attacked by ‘Silicon Valley’, which has identified banking as an industry that is very ‘ripe’ or juicy to disrupt.”
Fintech - disruptive technology
http://www.thestar.com.my/business/business-news/2016/05/21/fintech-disruptive-technology/ Businesses are embracing it by coming up with their innovations and startups A BUZZWORD growing in popularity in the financial world...
9 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/110708326148107740970 Willi Bleimeister : +Benjamen Warren 
+Benjamen Warren 
Jamie Dimon and Mike Bloomberg, Two New York Billionaires, Think They Know What Poor Kids Need
By Pam Martens and Russ Martens: May 17, 2016  Neal Gabler Bares His Desperate Finances at The Atlantic in Article Titled "The Secret Shame of Middle-Class
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