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Most recent 17 results returned for keyword: Human Rights Act (Search this on MAP)

https://plus.google.com/109750839103998133600 Ben Tasker : And once again, Theresa May shows the world just how #stupid and #uninformed she can actually be....
And once again, Theresa May shows the world just how #stupid and #uninformed she can actually be....... If only she'd realise, she might reconsider her aim to get rid of the #Human Rights Act
Row over May's migrant cat claim

2 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/102775808839589852423 Susan Colson Morson : "Article 10 of the Human Rights Act which protects individuals' freedom of expression. It is an established...
"Article 10 of the Human Rights Act which protects individuals' freedom of expression. It is an established legal principle that this freedom applies equally to information and ideas that are favourably received as to those which offend, shock and disturb"
3 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/107351560020151205057 Stephen Bourne : No such thing as Human Rights To late for me and my grandad. Social care providers need to understand...
No such thing as Human Rights
To late for me and my grandad. Social care providers need to understand the Human Rights of carers and the people they are supposed to protect. The Human Rights Act is not just to protect prison inmates or terrorists it is for all citizens of our country. h...
No such thing as Human Rights
To late for me and my grandad. Social care providers need to understand the Human Rights of carers and the people they are supposed to protect. The Human Rights Act is not just to protect prison inmates or terrorists it is fo...
9 days ago - Via Blogger - View -
https://plus.google.com/101670248192604004074 Francesca Van der Geld : Capital Punishment in the United Kingdom. Capital Punishment was abolished in 1965 in Great Britain ...
Capital Punishment in the United Kingdom.
Capital Punishment was abolished in 1965 in Great Britain and in 1973 in Northern Ireland.

Capital punishment in the United Kingdom was used from the creation of the state in 1707 until the practice was abolished in the 20th century. The last executions in the United Kingdom were by hanging, and took place in 1964, prior to capital punishment being abolished for murder (in 1965 in Great Britain and in 1973 in Northern Ireland). Although not applied since, the death penalty was abolished in all circumstances in 1998. In 2004 the 13th Protocol to the European Convention on Human Rights became binding on the United Kingdom, prohibiting the restoration of the death penalty for as long as the UK is a party to the Convention.

Background:
Sir Samuel Romilly, speaking to the House of Commons on capital punishment in 1810, declared that "[there is] no country on the face of the earth in which there [have] been so many different offences according to law to be punished with death as in England." Known as the "Bloody Code", at its height the criminal law included some 220 crimes punishable by death, including "being in the company of Gypsies for one month", "strong evidence of malice in a child aged 7–14 years of age" and "blacking the face or using a disguise whilst committing a crime". Many of these offences had been introduced to protect the property of the wealthy classes that emerged during the first half of the 18th century, a notable example being the Black Act of 1723, which created 50 capital offences for various acts of theft and poaching.

Whilst executions for murder, burglary and robbery were common, the death sentences for minor offenders were often not carried out. A sentence of death could be commuted or respited (permanently postponed) for reasons such as benefit of clergy, official pardons, pregnancy of the offender or performance of military or naval duty. Between 1770 and 1830, an estimated 35,000 death sentences were handed down in England and Wales, but only 7,000 executions were carried out.

Reform:
 This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2013)

In 1808 Romilly had the death penalty removed for pickpockets and lesser offenders, starting a process of reform that continued over the next 50 years. The death penalty was mandatory (although it was frequently commuted by the government) until the Judgement of Death Act 1823 gave judges the power to commute the death penalty except for treason and murder. The Punishment of Death, etc. Act 1832 reduced the number of capital crimes by two-thirds. Crimes eligible for the death penalty included shoplifting and stealing sheep, cattle, and horses, and before abolition of the death penalty for theft in 1832, "English law was notorious for prescribing the death penalty for a vast range of offenses as slight as the theft of goods valued at twelve pence." The death penalty was abolished for counterfeiting and almost all forms of forgery in the same year. Gibbeting was abolished in 1832 and hanging in chains was abolished in 1834. In 1861, several acts of Parliament (24 & 25 Vict; c. 94 to c. 100) further reduced the number of civilian capital crimes to five: murder, treason, espionage, arson in royal dockyards, and piracy with violence; there were other offences under military law. The death penalty remained mandatory for treason and murder unless commuted.

The Royal Commission on Capital Punishment 1864-1866
 concluded (with dissenting Commissioners) that there was not a case for abolition but recommended an end to public executions. This proposal was included in the Capital Punishment Amendment Act 1868. From then executions in Great Britain were carried out in prison. The practice of beheading and quartering executed traitors stopped in 1870.

Juveniles under 16 could no longer be executed from 1908 under the Children Act 1908. In 1922 a new offence of Infanticide was introduced to replace the charge of murder for mothers killing their children in the first year of life. In 1930 a parliamentary Select Committee recommended that capital punishment be suspended for a trial period of five years, but no action was taken. From 1931 pregnant women could no longer be hanged (following the birth of their child) although in practice since the 18th century their sentences had always been commuted, and in 1933 the minimum age for capital punishment was raised to 18 under the Children and Young Persons Act 1933. The last known execution by the civilian courts of a person under 18 was that of Charles Dobel, 17, hanged at Maidstone together with his accomplice William Gower, 18, in January 1889.

In 1938 the issue of the abolition of capital punishment was brought before parliament. A clause within the Criminal Justice Bill called for an experimental five-year suspension of the death penalty. When war broke out in 1939 the bill was postponed. It was revived after the war and to everyone's surprise was adopted by a majority in the House of Commons (245 to 222). In the House of Lords the abolition clause was defeated but the remainder of the bill was passed.
 
Popular support for abolition was absent and the government decided that it would be inappropriate for it to assert its supremacy by invoking the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949 over such an unpopular issue.
Instead, then Home Secretary, James Chuter Ede, set up a new Royal Commission (the Royal Commission on Capital Punishment, 1949–1953) with instructions to determine "whether the liability to suffer capital punishment should be limited or modified". The Commission's report discussed a number of alternatives to execution by hanging (including the US methods of electrocution and gassing, and the then-theoretical lethal injection), but rejected them. It had more difficulty with the principle of capital punishment. Popular opinion believed that the death penalty acted as a deterrent to criminals, but the statistics within the report were inconclusive. Whilst the report recommended abolition from an ethical standpoint, it made no mention of possible miscarriages of justice. The public had by then expressed great dissatisfaction with the verdict in the case of Timothy Evans, who was tried and hanged in 1950 for murdering his baby daughter. It later transpired in 1953 that John Christie had strangled at least six women in the same house; he also confessed to killing Timothy's wife. If the jury in Evans's trial had known this, Evans would probably not have been found guilty. There were other cases in the same period where doubts arose over convictions and subsequent hangings, such as the notorious case of Derek Bentley.

The commission concluded that unless there was overwhelming public support in favour of abolition, the death penalty should be retained.
Between 1900 and 1949, 621 men and 11 women were executed in England and Wales. Ten German agents were executed during the First World War under the Defence of the Realm Act 1914, and 16 spies were executed during the Second World War under the Treachery Act 1940.

By 1957 a number of controversial cases highlighted the issue of capital punishment again. Campaigners for abolition were partially rewarded with the Homicide Act 1957. The Act brought in a distinction between capital and non-capital homicide. Only six categories of murder were now punishable by execution:
in the course or furtherance of theft
by shooting or causing an explosion
while resisting arrest or during an escape
of a police officer
of a prison officer by a prisoner
the second of two murders committed on different occasions (if both done in Great Britain).

The police and the government were of the opinion that the death penalty deterred offenders from carrying firearms and it was for this reason that such offences remained punishable by death.

Abolition:

 The only known photograph of the death sentence being pronounced in England and Wales, for the poisoner Frederick Seddon in 1912
Murder
In 1965 the Labour MP Sydney Silverman, who had committed himself to the cause of abolition for more than 20 years, introduced a private member's bill to suspend the death penalty, which was passed on a free vote in the House of Commons by 200 votes to 98. The bill was subsequently passed by the House of Lords by 204 votes to 104.

The Murder (Abolition of Death Penalty) Act 1965 suspended the death penalty in England, Wales and Scotland (but not in Northern Ireland) for murder for a period of five years, and substituted a mandatory sentence of life imprisonment; it further provided that if, before the expiry of the five-year suspension, each House of Parliament passed a resolution to make the effect of the Act permanent, then it would become permanent. In 1969 the Home Secretary, James Callaghan, proposed a motion to make the Act permanent, which was carried in the Commons on 16 December 1969, and a similar motion was carried in the Lords on 18 December. The death penalty for murder was abolished in Northern Ireland on 25 July 1973 under the Northern Ireland (Emergency Provisions) Act 1973.

Following the abolition of the death penalty for murder, the House of Commons held a vote during each subsequent parliament until 1997 to restore the death penalty. This motion was always defeated, but the death penalty still remained for other crimes:
1.causing a fire or explosion in a naval dockyard, ship, magazine or warehouse (until 1971);
2.espionage (until 1981);
3.piracy with violence (until 1998);
4.treason (until 1998); and
5.certain purely military offences under the jurisdiction of the armed forces, such as mutiny[17] (until 1998). Prior to its complete abolition in 1998, it was available for six offences: 1.serious misconduct in action;
2.assisting the enemy;
3.obstructing operations;
4.giving false air signals;
5.mutiny or incitement to mutiny; and
6.failure to suppress a mutiny with intent to assist the enemy.

However no executions were carried out in the United Kingdom for any of these offences, after the abolition of the death penalty for murder.
Nevertheless, there remained a working gallows at HMP Wandsworth, London, until 1994, which was tested every six months until 1992. This gallows is now housed in the Galleries of Justice in Nottingham.

Last executions:
England and in the United Kingdom: on 13 August 1964, Peter Anthony Allen, at Walton Prison in Liverpool, and Gwynne Owen Evans, at Strangeways Prison in Manchester, were executed for the murder of John Alan West on 7 April that year.
Scotland: Henry John Burnett, 21, on 15 August 1963 in Craiginches Prison, Aberdeen, for the murder of seaman Thomas Guyan.
Northern Ireland: Robert McGladdery, 25, on 20 December 1961 in Crumlin Road Gaol, Belfast, for the murder of Pearl Gamble.
Wales: Vivian Teed, 24, in Swansea on 6 May 1958, for the murder of William Williams, sub-postmaster of Fforestfach Post Office.

Last death sentences:

Northern Ireland and in the United Kingdom: Liam Holden in 1973 in Northern Ireland, for the capital murder of a British soldier during the Troubles. Holden was removed from the death cell in May 1973. In 2012 his conviction was quashed on appeal.
England: David Chapman, who was sentenced to hang in November 1965 for the murder of a swimming pool nightwatchman in Scarborough. He was released from prison in 1979 and later died in a car accident.
Scotland: Patrick McCarron in 1964 for shooting his wife. He hanged himself in prison in 1970.
Wales: Edgar Black, who was reprieved on 6 November 1963. He had shot his wife's lover in Cardiff.

Final abolition:

The Criminal Damage Act 1971 abolished the offence of arson in royal dockyards.
The Naval Discipline Act 1957 reduced the scope of capital espionage from "all spies for the enemy" to spies on naval ships or bases. Later, the Armed Forces Act 1981 abolished the death penalty for espionage. (The Official Secrets Act 1911 had created another offence of espionage which carried a maximum sentence of fourteen years.)

Beheading was abolished as a method of execution for treason in 1973. However hanging remained available until 1998 when, under a House of Lords amendment to the Crime and Disorder Act 1998, proposed by Lord Archer of Sandwell, the death penalty was abolished for treason and piracy with violence, replacing it with a discretionary maximum sentence of life imprisonment. These were the last civilian offences punishable by death.

On 20 May 1998 the House of Commons voted to ratify the 6th Protocol of the European Convention on Human Rights prohibiting capital punishment except "in time of war or imminent threat of war." The last remaining provisions for the death penalty under military jurisdiction (including in wartime) were removed when section 21(5) of the Human Rights Act 1998 came into force on 9 November 1998. On 10 October 2003, effective from 1 February 2004, the UK acceded to the 13th Protocol, which prohibits the death penalty under all circumstances.

As a legacy from colonial times, several states in the West Indies still had the British Judicial Committee of the Privy Council as the court of final appeal; although the death penalty has been retained in these states, the Privy Council would sometimes delay or deny executions. Some of these states severed links with the British court system in 2001 by transferring the responsibilities of the Privy Council to the Caribbean Court of Justice, to speed up executions.

Public support for reintroduction of capital punishment:

Since the death penalty's abolition in 1965, there have been continued public and media calls for its reintroduction, particularly prompted by high-profile murder cases.

At the same time, there have been a number of miscarriages of justice since 1965 where someone convicted of murder has later had their conviction quashed on appeal and been released from prison, strengthening the argument of those who oppose the death penalty's reintroduction. These include the Birmingham Six (cleared in 1991 of planting an IRA bomb which killed 21 people in 1974), the Guildford Four (cleared in 1989 of murdering five people in another 1974 IRA bombing), Stephen Downing (a Derbyshire man who was freed in 2001 after serving 27 years for the murder of a woman in a churchyard) and Barry George (who was freed in 2007 when his conviction for the 1999 murder of TV presenter Jill Dando was quashed on appeal).

Perhaps the first high-profile murder case which sparked widespread calls for a return of the death penalty was the Moors Murders trial in 1966, the year after the death penalty's abolition, in which Ian Brady and Myra Hindley were sentenced to life imprisonment for the murders of two children and a teenager in the Manchester area (they later confessed to a further two murders). Later in 1966, the murder of three policemen in West London also attracted widespread public support for the death penalty's return. Other subsequent high-profile cases to have sparked widespread media and public calls for the death penalty's return include "Yorkshire Ripper" Peter Sutcliffe, convicted in 1981 of murdering 13 women and attacking seven others in the north of England, Roy Whiting, who murdered a seven-year-old girl in West Sussex in 2000, and Ian Huntley, a Cambridgeshire school caretaker who killed two 10-year-old girls in 2002.

A November 2009 television survey showed that 70% favoured reinstating the death penalty for at least one of the following crimes: armed robbery, rape, crimes related to paedophilia, terrorism, adult murder, child murder, child rape, treason, child abuse, or kidnapping. However, respondents only favoured capital punishment for adult murder, the polling question asked by other organisations such as Gallup, by small majorities or pluralities: overall, 51% favoured the death penalty for adult murder, while 56% in Wales did, 55% in Scotland, and only 49% in England.

In August 2011, the Internet blogger Paul Staines—who writes a political blog as Guido Fawkes and heads the Restore Justice Campaign—launched an e-petition on the Downing Street website calling for the restoration of the death penalty for those convicted of the murder of children and police officers. The petition was one of several in support or opposition of capital punishment to be published by the government with the launch of its e-petitions website. Petitions attracting 100,000 signatures would prompt a parliamentary debate on a particular topic, but not necessarily lead to any Parliamentary Bills being put forward. When the petition closed on 4 February 2012 it had received 26,351 signatures in support of restoring capital punishment, but a counter-petition calling to retain the ban on capital punishment received 33,455 signatures during the same time period.

Also in August 2011, a representative survey conducted by Angus Reid Public Opinion showed that 65% of Britons support reinstating the death penalty for murder in Great Britain, while 28% oppose this course of action. Men and respondents aged over 35 are more likely to endorse the change.
Capital punishment in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In 1808 Romilly had the death penalty removed for pickpockets and lesser offenders, starting a process of reform that continued over the next 50 years. The death penalty was mandatory (although it was frequently commuted by the government) until the Judgement of Death Act 1823 gave judges the ...
10 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/106478733207718119687 HRC INDIA : ** Human Rights Act , 1993 (with Amendment Act, 2006),
**
Human Rights Act , 1993 (with
Amendment Act, 2006),
HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL, INDIA
Human Rights Act, 1993 (with Amendment Act, 2006),
11 days ago - Via Blogger - View -
https://plus.google.com/101963471547845370796 Suzi Arnold : Information for Investigators on common law, statute law, the human rights act and more
Information for Investigators on common law, statute law, the human rights act and more
Fraud information for Investigators
Statute Law, Human rights act 1998, Data Protection Act and issuing a summons by QVF Investigators
12 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/103275982526755099619 Howard Friedman : Supreme Court Denies Review In New Mexico Same-Sex Wedding Photographer Case The U.S. Supreme Court ...
Supreme Court Denies Review In New Mexico Same-Sex Wedding Photographer Case
The U.S. Supreme Court today denied certiorari in  Elane Photography v. Willock ,  (Docket No. 13-585, cert. denied 4/7/2014). ( Order List .) In the case, the New Mexico Supreme Court held that the New Mexico Human Rights Act requires a commercial photogra...
Supreme Court Denies Review In New Mexico Same-Sex Wedding Photographer Case
The U.S. Supreme Court today denied certiorari in Elane Photography v. Willock,  (Docket No. 13-585, cert. denied 4/7/2014). (Order List.) In the case, the New Mexico Supreme Court held that the New Mexico Human Rights Act re...
12 days ago - Via Blogger - View -
https://plus.google.com/103897270043302299406 Ankum Singh Chauhan : No punishment without law You cannot be charged with a criminal offence for an action that was not a...
No punishment without law You cannot be charged with a criminal offence for an action that was not a crime when you committed it. This means that public authorities have to make sure that laws explain clearly what counts as a criminal offence, so that you know when you are breaking the law. It is also against the law for the courts to give you a greater sentence than was available at the time you committed an offence. Restrictions The right to no punishment without law is absolute. This means that it cannot be restricted in any way. However, the Human Rights Act does make an exception for acts that were “against the general law of civilised nations” at the time they were committed. For example, this sort of provision allowed war crimes to be prosecuted following World War II. What the law says Article 7: No punishment without law 1. No one shall be held guilty of any criminal offence on account of any act or omission which did not constitute a criminal offence under national law at the time when it was committed. Nor shall a heavier penalty be imposed than the one that was applicable at the time the criminal offence was committed. 2. This Article shall not prejudice the trial and punishment of any person for any act or omission which, at the time when it was committed, was criminal according to the general principles of law recognised by civilised nations.
Ankum Singh Chauhan President Kanpur Mandal(Youth Wing) -National Human Right Protection Institution
No punishment without law You cannot be charged with a criminal offence for an action that was not a crime when you committed it. This means that public authorities have to make sure that laws explain clearly what counts as a criminal offence, so that you know when you are breaking the law. It is also against the law for the courts to give you a greater sentence than was available at the time you committed an offence. Restrictions The right to no punishment without law is absolute. This means that it cannot be restricted in any way. However, the Human Rights Act does make an exception for acts that were “against the general law of civilised nations” at the time they were committed. For example, this sort of provision allowed war crimes to be prosecuted following World War II. What the law says Article 7: No punishment without law 1. No one shall be held guilty of any criminal offence on account of any act or omission which did not constitute a criminal offence under national law at the time when it was committed. Nor shall a heavier penalty be imposed than the one that was applicable at the time the criminal offence was committed. 2. This Article shall not prejudice the trial and punishment of any person for any act or omission which, at the time when it was committed, was criminal according to the general principles of law recognised by civilised nations.
Ankum Singh Chauhan President Kanpur Mandal(Youth Wing) -National Human Right Protection Institution
13 days ago - Via Blogger - View -
https://plus.google.com/103897270043302299406 Ankum Singh Chauhan : The Human Rights Act 1998 (also known as the Act or the HRA) came into force in the United Kingdom in...
The Human Rights Act 1998 (also known as the Act or the HRA) came into force in the United Kingdom in October 2000. It is composed of a series of sections that have the effect of codifying the protections in the European Convention on Human Rights into UK law. All public bodies (such as courts, police, local governments, hospitals, publicly funded schools, and others) and other bodies carrying out public functions have to comply with the Convention rights. This means, among other things, that individuals can take human rights cases in domestic courts; they no longer have to go to Strasbourg to argue their case in the European Court of Human Rights.
Ankum Singh Chauhan President Kanpur Mandal(Youth Wing) -National Human Right Protection Institution
The Human Rights Act 1998 (also known as the Act or the HRA) came into force in the United Kingdom in October 2000. It is composed of a series of sections that have the effect of codifying the protections in the European Convention on Human Rights into UK law. All public bodies (such as courts, police, local governments, hospitals, publicly funded schools, and others) and other bodies carrying out public functions have to comply with the Convention rights. This means, among other things, that individuals can take human rights cases in domestic courts; they no longer have to go to Strasbourg to argue their case in the European Court of Human Rights.
Ankum Singh Chauhan President Kanpur Mandal(Youth Wing) -National Human Right Protection Institution
13 days ago - Via Blogger - View -
https://plus.google.com/100996847292306345470 Kev mei : Article 9: of the human rights act says Freedom of thought, conscience and religion 1. Everyone has ...
Article 9: of the human rights act says
Freedom of thought,
conscience and religion
1.
Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this
right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either
alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his
religion or belief, in worship, teaching, practice and observance.
2.
Freedom to manifest one’s religion or beliefs shall be subject only to such
limitations as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic
society in the interests of public safety, for the protection of public order,
health or morals, or the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.
Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights provides that:
18 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/117214889121148782910 Hugh Hunt : Latest on News-Hunt at www.hug-h.com Egypt optimistically trying to bring back tourists to a country...
Latest on News-Hunt at www.hug-h.com
Egypt optimistically trying to bring back tourists to a country wracked by un-rest violence and instability.
New Labour's Human Rights Act blocks “natural justice” and must go.
The Zimbabwean Black Kettle calling the Nigerian Black Pot Black!
If growing old was really this painful you wouldn't bother would you?
Apparently they bear arms for Jesus in Kentucky!
Are massive technological advances breaking down the fabric of society in the west?
Pope Francis gives the Mafia a good telling off as Coke filled Condoms fail to reach the Vatican.
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-JE7_paXNTH4/UzqiC-DL3NI/AAAAAAAAF7Y/TbNMGdYtZNI/w506-h750/gun.jpg
18 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/108840098936259121082 Mark Mager : Access to Para Transit services should be incorporated into our Human Rights Act
Access to Para Transit services should be incorporated into our Human Rights Act
Demand Universal Access to... - The Petition Site
Mobility challenged individuals with wheel chairs, walkers, canes etc. should have a guaranteed right to...
21 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/106195439559291695629 Shreya Shivakumar : HC issues two week notice to State Human Rights Commission over a petition challenging its order Chennai...
HC issues two week notice to State Human Rights Commission over a petition challenging its order
Chennai: Madras High Court has issued a two weeks notice to State Human Rights Commission after a petitioner challenged its order alleging that the rights body has ignored the powers given to it under section 13 of Protection of Human Rights Act and delegat...
HC issues two week notice to State Human Rights Commission over a petition challenging its order
Chennai: Madras High Court has issued a two weeks notice to State Human Rights Commission after a petitioner challenged its order alleging that the rights body has ignored the powers given to it under section 13 of Protectio...
23 days ago - Via Blogger - View -
https://plus.google.com/109542890688294423654 Graham Briar : #deportingforeigncriminals   #deportation   #illegalimmigrants   #humanrightsact   #europeanconventi...
#deportingforeigncriminals   #deportation   #illegalimmigrants   #humanrightsact   #europeanconventiononhumanrights  

Yes we can deport a sick man but NOT a criminal. Once again the Home Office declares another crackdown on deporting foreign criminals but like all those that have gone before this is mere rhetoric until the Human Rights Act is either scrapped or revamped.
We Can Deport a Sick Man but NOT a Criminal
Yes we can deport a sick man but NOT a criminal. Once again the Home Office declares another crackdown on deporting foreign criminals but like all those that have gone before this is mere rhetoric until the Human Rights Act is either scrapped or revamped.
25 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/115212823950444967993 MaryLovesJustice Neal : Recent comments on my Petition for Free Speech Cindy ~ I am with you on this, so many of our rights ...
Recent comments on my Petition for Free Speech 
Cindy ~ I am with you on this, so many of our rights are being taken away. There is no criminal justice system, the ones in criminal justice are the criminals. It is time for us all to come together and stop all this political B.S. I am fighting for prisoner rights also! God Bless you Mary

Thomas Manzitti ~ It's Luciferian Illuminati against Human BEings...END the ILL.

Toney Norris ~ I support the human rights act , because I know that numbers speaks , and it's time to come together as a People .
http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/free-mary-neal
Free Mary Neal
I just visited www.ipetitions.com and signed an important petition. I really care about this cause and hope you'll show your support for it.
26 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/114197628953503010421 Jerry Gibbons : As our first female leader Redford had the opportunity to bring Alberta out of the dark ages where human...
As our first female leader Redford had the opportunity to bring Alberta out of the dark ages where human rights and protections are concerned. Her legacy was not to be found in the boardrooms of big oil but rather in the streets of the towns and cities that elected her. Her legacy could have been the strongest human rights act and enforcement in the country.
No Sympathy for Redford | Alberta1Voice.Org
Do I sense a touch of sympathy growing for Redford? I don't know that she felt any for those being raped murdered and assaulted in long term care. All she had to do to end it was push through a strong whistle blower act. It would not have cost the province a single cent so it's clear that money ...
28 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/101509565352394065184 Jackie Elle : My thoughts today will be with my brothers, sisters and allies at the #C279   #dayofaction in Ottawa...
My thoughts today will be with my brothers, sisters and allies at the #C279   #dayofaction in Ottawa standing for our rights, not just in Ontario, but for Trans* rights across Canada.  If it wasn't for my training, I would be included in the numbers, but I will be there in spirit.

Just wanted to say thanks for all those that show up!

For everyone else on my lists, 1 year ago a bill amendment was tabled for changes to the Canadian Human Rights Act and Hate Crimes provision of the Criminal Code to include 'gender identity.'  It was adopted by Parliament and sent to Senate for approval. Senate was set to pass the bill at 3rd Reading in June, however due to procedural delays is still stalled.

Today, one year later, we aim to promote, encourage and support the eventual passage and Royal Assent of this important Human Rights Legislation. 

If anyone (Canadians please) wishes to contact their member of Senate to add your voice of support, it would be appreciated.

C-279 Day of Action:
facebook.com/events/1407363196189582
Contact Senate Members:  http://www.parl.gc.ca/SenatorsMembers/Senate/SenatorsBiography/isenator.asp?Language=E
#C279   #DayOfAction   #CanadianSenate   #transrights   #Transphobia   #hatecrimes   #humanrights  
Current Senators
Name, Affiliation, Province (Designation), Date of nomination, Date of retirement, Appointed on the advice of: A, Top of page. Andreychuk, Raynell, C, Saskatchewan (Saskatchewan), 1993-03-11, 2019-08-14, Mulroney (PC). Ataullahjan, Salma, C, Ontario (Toronto), 2010-07-09, 2027-04-29, Harper (C) ...
30 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -