Sign in with Twitter Sign in with Facebook

Type the topic in any language to check out real time results of Who's Talking on Social Media Sites


Trending Topics: デモ規制テング熱刑事ライダー#BirkereBileOlsaOnurDuyuyoruzÇünkü FENERBAHÇEliyiz#FootSelfieForNash20代男女ŞampiyonlarLigi MüdavimiGALATASARAY#krazy1milliongiveaway#WorseCollegeMascots#KeşkeOlmasaydıDiyorum#WWAStLouisShaun WrightアギーレJAPAN#YouCantBeBaeIf#hatırlıyorum代表発表ありがとうございます?こちらこそ仲良くしてくださいデング熱#ErkenciTayfa#Rotherham#GBBOYeni Türkiye#USOpenRabbim31ちゃいVeroTeşekkürlerBellucciZenonThomazPakistaniBotafogoLabourZé LoveVidal#ThrowbackThursdayTrabzonsporMarinaCorinthiansNapoleon DynamiteHello KittySeu JorgeCaliNyquilEnglandLondonXmasバイクに乗らず代々木公園で感染German Shepard#CutestCouplesラブライブのスタンプメンプロ嬉しい?#こいを一発変換して恋なら思春期Rotherhamİstanbul#ZenonWill HaydenEmmy Winners 2014Cici BellisKnee DefenderKind CampaignThe Normal HeartTrue DetectiveTim WrightStephen LeeNational Dog DayJosh ShawJosh GordonTwitchUS OpenUZIhayden panettiereTim HortonsJessica LangePretty Little LiarsChelsea HandlerMore

Most recent 20 results returned for keyword: Howard Carter (Search this on MAP)

https://plus.google.com/109436467474427271066 AHMED SABRY : In the second half of the Middle Kingdom (about 1900–1800 B.C.), a large tomb with a pillared portico...
In the second half of the Middle Kingdom (about 1900–1800 B.C.), a large tomb with a pillared portico and courtyard was carved into the bedrock at the eastern end of the Asasif valley in western Thebes. Eventually, the original burials were looted and the tomb itself was adapted for reuse as a cemetery that was active for several generations around the beginning of the New Kingdom (ca. 1550 B.C.). This cemetery was covered over early in the joint reign of Hatshepsut and Thutmose III (ca. 1470 B.C.), when the courtyard was filled and a causeway leading to Hatshepsut's temple at Deir el-Bahri was constructed.

In the early twentieth century, Howard Carter and Lord Carnarvon discovered and excavated the northern half of the courtyard. A few years later, in the 1915–16 season, Ambrose Lansing, who oversaw the Metropolitan Museum's excavations during World War I, cleared the southern half of the courtyard. Lansing's efforts were rewarded with the discovery of numerous intact burials dating from late Dynasty 17 to early Dynasty 18. This important transitional period encompasses the time when a family of Theban rulers (Dynasty 17) succeeded in reunifying Egypt under a single king, Ahmose, who ushered in the New Kingdom. Objects from these excavations that came to the Museum in the division of finds may be seen in Egyptian galleries 114 and 117.

In January 1935, while excavating near the eastern end of Hatshepsut's causeway, Museum excavators Ambrose Lansing and William C. Hayes discovered the family tomb of Neferkhawt, a scribe who served Hatshesput when she was a princess during the reign of her father, Thutmose I (ca. 1490 B.C.). The tomb had been used over several generations before it was covered by a causeway built by Hatshesput's nephew, Thutmose III, in about 1435 B.C. The occupants included Neferkhawt and his wife, Rennefer, both elderly when they died; their daughter Ruyu and son Amenemhat, who also lived long lives; and a man named Bakamun, perhaps Ruyu's husband. An adult woman and four children, presumably also Neferkhawt's relatives, had been placed in the tomb some years later.

Neferkhawt's tomb was cut into crumbling bedrock at the edge of the desert near cultivated land. Over the centuries, groundwater and insects had largely destroyed the coffins and other wooden tomb furnishings, but careful recording and removal of the remains allowed excavators to reconstruct, at least on paper, almost all the contents of this otherwise intact tomb. These objects reflect a gradual change in the style of funerary furnishings, personal ornaments, and possessions over a period of about half a century in the early New Kingdom.
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-EBvT33JitI4/U_3ONNnYQLI/AAAAAAAADUs/zGnMWZ7548s/w506-h750/Assasif1.jpg
18 hours ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/116944841731092635158 Clancy Tucker : 24 August 2014 - KING TUT SECRETS KING TUT SECRETS G'day folks, Welcome to some secrets about King Tut...
24 August 2014 - KING TUT SECRETS
KING TUT SECRETS G'day folks, Welcome to some secrets about King Tut. On January 3, 1924, British archaeologist Howard Carter,
who had been excavating the burial chamber of Tutankhamen in Egypt's Valley of
Kings for nearly two years, uncovered the tomb's gr...
24 August 2014 - KING TUT SECRETS
KING TUT SECRETS G'day folks, Welcome to some secrets about King Tut. On January 3, 1924, British archaeologist Howard Carter, who had been excavating the burial chamber of Tutankhamen in Egypt's Valley of Kings for ne...
4 days ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/109662729815082372442 BooksFact : King Tutankhamun Tomb Curse , Pyramid in Egypt - Everyone who were involved in the excavation of the...
King Tutankhamun Tomb Curse , Pyramid in Egypt - Everyone who were involved in the excavation of the tomb of Tutankhamun in egypt, died in the subsequent years. When members in the Howard Carter group died, the curse of the Pharaohs was brought more into the lime light. It is still one of the unexplained and unsolved mysteries of the world. The curse was [] The post King Tutankhamun Tomb Curse , Pyramid in Egypt appeared first on Books Fact. http://ow.ly/2MdrrD
King Tutankhamun Tomb Curse , Pyramid in Egypt - Mysteries
King Tutankhamun Tomb Curse of the Pharaos, facts, history, pyramid in egypt, mummy of 19 year old who died of malaria, deaths after opening his grave in 1923
5 days ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/109463143438311568617 Darlene Noyce : Howard Carter an English archeological . Examining the open sarcophagus of King Tut .
Howard Carter an English archeological . Examining the open sarcophagus of King Tut .
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-0v_ooYJhQKg/U_Ud57610PI/AAAAAAAAraQ/o29rPH3Y5P0/w506-h750/aeaf7b24bb8a3b6f2df899feaf41c45d.jpg
7 days ago - Via Community - View -
https://plus.google.com/113815555305127082894 FABRICA DE JUNTAS HERMES : The Carter Two-Engine Car – The Fail Safe Automobile: Howard Carter came up with the idea for the two...
The Carter Two-Engine Car – The Fail Safe Automobile: Howard Carter came up with the idea for the two engine automobile after an incident where he was not able to start his car. He then designed, patented and brought to market his two-engined car that the public rejected. Read the story and see more photos at: http://theoldmotor.com/?p=125676
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-p-NrR_F1TNA/U_HYfwcRezI/AAAAAAAAO_I/77HibbjV4WU/w506-h750/Carter1.jpg
9 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/103752493698086716797 TheOldMotor.com : The Carter Two-Engine Car – The Fail Safe Automobile: Howard Carter came up with the idea for the two...
The Carter Two-Engine Car – The Fail Safe Automobile: Howard Carter came up with the idea for the two engine automobile after an incident where he was not able to start his car. He then designed, patented and brought to market his two-engined car that the public rejected. Read the story and see more photos at: http://theoldmotor.com/?p=125676
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-oFWQVQPTKj8/U_HZV8pUDlI/AAAAAAAAPBg/ZIOfpCuOwDU/w506-h750/Carter1.jpg
9 days ago - Via Community - View -
https://plus.google.com/102155682959506792289 Deepan Immanuel Chakravarthy : King Tutankhamun and the Royal Family of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Ancient Egypt: In 1922 Howard Carter...
King Tutankhamun and the Royal Family of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Ancient Egypt:
In 1922 Howard Carter uncovered the almost undisturbed tomb and the royal mummy of a nineteen-year-old boy from the late Eighteenth Dynasty, now popularly known as King Tut. This burial trove remains one of the most remarkable discoveries in Egyptology to date, capturing the public imagination in an unprecedented way, and Tutankhamun’s life (and the causes of his premature death) 3,300 years ago continues to be a subject of fascination. However, despite the wealth of artifacts found, the tomb contained very little information about Tutankhamun’s origins and family. Some names of key figures from the period appear amongst the artifacts, but no one inscription definitively tells us who the pharaoh’s parents were. Furthermore, few other mummies from the Amarna period have been definitively identified. Many Egyptologists believe that Tutankhamun was born to the pharaoh Akhenaten and his great royal wife Nefertiti, or his second wife Kiya, but these claims are highly debated.
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-H9R9Zjsoa5M/U_Gh2gVwWpI/AAAAAAAAHVA/TurG2EYaGLg/w506-h750/Howard%2BCarter%2Bopens%2Bthe.jpg
10 days ago - Via Community - View -
https://plus.google.com/102155682959506792289 Deepan Immanuel Chakravarthy : King Tutankhamun's Pyramid And Curse: Almost all people who were involved in the excavation of the tomb...
King Tutankhamun's Pyramid And Curse:
Almost all people who were involved in the excavation of the tomb of Tutankhamun died in the subsequent years. After most of the members in the Howard Carter group died, the curse of the Pharaohs was brought more into the lime light. It is still one of the unexplained and unsolved mysteries of the world. The curse said that who ever would disturb the sleep of a Pharaoh would die.

Read more at: http://www.boldsky.com/insync/pulse/2012/unsolved-world-mysteries-part-6-030573.html
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-BJ5j6p72Mhw/U_GCGFWR2iI/AAAAAAAAHO4/LNdh5_aHW4c/w506-h750/King%2BTutankhamun%2527s%2BPyramid%2BAnd.jpg
10 days ago - Via Community - View -
https://plus.google.com/106066465274257975725 Sirley Ríos Acuña : Egypt asks Ashmolean museum to lend it personal collection of Howard Carter.
Egypt asks Ashmolean museum to lend it personal collection of Howard Carter.
Egypt asks Ashmolean museum to lend it personal collection of Howard Carter | Cairo Post
CAIRO: Tourism Promotion Authority (TPA) submitted a request to the Ashmolean museum of Art and Archaeology in Oxford to borrow the currently on display personal collectibles of the original records, drawings and photographs of Howard Carter, who discovered the tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922, ...
16 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/110022356432771860888 El Cid Al-Moussawi : Dilmun (Sumerian Bahrain) Dilmun or Telmun[1]   was a civilization in ancient Bahrain .[2][3] Dilmun...
Dilmun (Sumerian Bahrain)
 
Dilmun or Telmun[1]   was a civilization in ancient Bahrain .[2][3] Dilmun was an important trading centre[2] which at the height of its power controlled the Persian Gulf trading routes.[2] The Sumerians regarded Dilmun as holy land.[4] Although the central location of Dilmun is unclear, the scholarly consensus is that Dilmun encompassed Bahrain, Kuwait[5][6] and the coastal regions of the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia.[7] Dilmun was mentioned by Mesopotamian civilizations as a trade partner, a source of the metal copper, and an entrepôt of the Mesopotamia-to-Indus Valley Civilization trade route.
 
It is also noted that Gilgamesh had to pass through Mount Mashu to reach Dilmun in the Epic of Gilgamesh, which is usually identified with the whole of the parallel Lebanon andAnti-Lebanon ranges, with the narrow gap between these mountains constituting the tunnel.[8] Others believe Mount Mashu was one of two ("twin") mountains that held up the sky at the eastern and western extremities of the world. The Sumerian versions of the Gilgamesh epic demonstrate that the earlier versions of the myth sited the Cedar Mountain to the east, in the direction of the rising of Utu, the Sumerian sun god.[9]
Dilmun is regarded as one of the oldest ancient civilizations in the Middle East.[10][11] The Sumerians described Dilmun as a paradise garden in the Epic of Gilgamesh.[12] The Sumerian tale of the garden paradise of Dilmun may have been an inspiration for the Garden of Eden story.[12]
 
 
History
 
Dilmun was an important trading center from the late fourth millennium to 800 BC.[2] At the height of her power, Dilmun controlled the Persian Gulf trading routes.[2] Dilmun was very prosperous during the first 300 years of the second millennium.[13] Dilmun's commercial power began to decline between 1000 BC and 800 BC because piracy flourished in the Persian Gulf. In 600 BC, the Babylonians and later the Persians added Dilmun to their empires.
 
The Dilmun civilization was the centre of commercial activities linking traditional agriculture of the land - then utterly fertile due to artesian wells that have dried since, and due to a much wetter climate - with maritime trade between diverse regions such as the Indus Valley named Meluhha, present ´Omân = Makan, and Mesopotamia. [11] The Dilmun civilization is mentioned first in Sumerian cuneiform clay tablets dated to the late third millennium BC, found in the temple of goddess Inanna, in the city of Uruk. The adjectiveDilmun is used to describe a type of axe and one specific official; in addition there are lists of rations of wool issued to people connected with Dilmun.[14]
 
One of the earliest inscriptions mentioning Dilmun is that of king Ur-Nanshe of Lagash (c. 2300 BC) found in a door-socket: "The ships of Dilmun brought him wood as tribute from foreign lands."[15]
 
Dilmun was mentioned in two letters dated to the reign of Burnaburiash (c. 1370 BC) recovered from Nippur, during the Kassitedynasty of Babylon. These letters were from a provincial official, Ilī-ippašra, in Dilmun to his friend Enlil-kidinni, the governor of Nippur. The names referred to are Akkadian. These letters and other documents, hint at an administrative relationship between Dilmun andBabylon at that time. Following the collapse of the Kassite dynasty, Mesopotamian documents make no mention of Dilmun with the exception of Assyrian inscriptions dated to 1250 BC which proclaimed the Assyrian king to be king of Dilmun and Meluhha, as well as Lower Sea and Upper Sea. Assyrian inscriptions recorded tribute from Dilmun.
 
There are other Assyrian inscriptions during the first millennium BC indicating Assyrian sovereignty over Dilmun.[16] One of the early sites discovered in Bahrain suggests that Sennacherib, king of Assyria (707–681 BC), attacked northeast Arabia and captured the Bahrainian islands.[17] The most recent reference to Dilmun came during the Neo-Babylonian dynasty. Neo-Babylonian administrative records, dated 567 BC, stated that Dilmun was controlled by the king of Babylon. The name of Dilmun fell from use after the collapse of Babylon in 538 BC.[16]
There is both literary and archaeological evidence of trade between Ancient Mesopotamia and the Indus Valley civilization (probably correctly identified with the land calledMeluhha in Akkadian). Impressions of clay seals from the Indus Valley city of Harappa were evidently used to seal bundles of merchandise, as clay seal impressions with cord or sack marks on the reverse side testify. A number of these Indus Valley seals have turned up at Ur and other Mesopotamian sites.
The "Persian Gulf" types of circular, stamped (rather than rolled) seals known from Dilmun, that appear at Lothal in Gujarat, India, and Failaka, as well as in Mesopotamia, are convincing corroboration of the long-distance sea trade. What the commerce consisted of is less known: timber and precious woods, ivory, lapis lazuli, gold, and luxury goods such as carnelian and glazed stone beads, pearls from the Persian Gulf, shell and bone inlays, were among the goods sent to Mesopotamia in exchange for silver, tin, woolen textiles, olive oil and grains.
Copper ingots from Oman and bitumen which occurred naturally in Mesopotamia may have been exchanged for cotton textiles and domestic fowl, major products of the Indus region that are not native to Mesopotamia. Instances of all of these trade goods have been found. The importance of this trade is shown by the fact that the weights and measures used at Dilmun were in fact identical to those used by the Indus, and were not those used in Southern Mesopotamia.
 
Mesopotamian trade documents, lists of goods, and official inscriptions mentioning Meluhha supplement Harappan seals and archaeological finds. Literary references to Meluhhan trade date from the Akkadian, the Third Dynasty of Ur, and Isin-Larsa Periods (c. 2350–1800 BC), but the trade probably started in the Early Dynastic Period (c. 2600 BC). Some Meluhhan vessels may have sailed directly to Mesopotamian ports, but by the Isin-Larsa Period, Dilmun monopolized the trade. The Bahrain National Museum assesses that its "Golden Age" lasted ca. 2200-1600 BC. Discoveries of ruins under the Persian Gulf may be of Dilmun.[18]
Dilmun and mythology
 
Dilmun, sometimes described as "the place where the sun rises" and "the Land of the Living", is the scene of some versions of the Sumerian creation myth, and the place where the deified Sumerian hero of the flood, Utnapishtim (Ziusudra), was taken by the gods to live forever. Thorkild Jacobsen's translation of the Eridu Genesis calls it "Mount Dilmun"which he locates as a "faraway, half-mythical place".[19]
 
Dilmun is also described in the epic story of Enki and Ninhursag as the site at which the Creation occurred. The later Babylonian Enuma Elish, speaks of the creation site as the place where the mixture of salt water, personified as Tiamat met and mingled with the fresh water of Abzu. Bahrein in Arabic means "the twin waters", where the fresh water of theArabian aquifer mingles with the salt waters of the Persian Gulf. The promise of Enki to Ninhursag, the Earth Mother:
For Dilmun, the land of my lady's heart, I will create long waterways, rivers and canals, whereby water will flow to quench the thirst of all beings and bring abundance to all that lives.
 
Ninlil, the Sumerian goddess of air and south wind had her home in Dilmun. It is also featured in the Epic of Gilgamesh.
 
However, in the early epic "Enmerkar and the Lord of Aratta", the main events, which center on Enmerkar's construction of the ziggurats in Uruk and Eridu, are described as taking place in a world "before Dilmun had yet been settled".
 
It is also noted that Gilgamesh had to pass through Mount Mashu to reach Dilmun in the Epic of Gilgamesh, which is usually identified with the whole of the parallel Lebanon andAnti-Lebanon ranges, with the narrow gap between these mountains constituting the tunnel.[8] Others believe Mount Mashu was one of two ("twin") mountains that held up the sky at the eastern and western extremities of the world. The Sumerian versions of the Gilgamesh epic demonstrate that the earlier versions of the myth sited the Cedar Mountain to the east, in the direction of the rising of Utu, the Sumerian sun god.[9]
 
 
Location of Dilmun
 
 
Despite the scholarly consensus that ancient Dilmun encompasses three modern locations - the eastern littoral of Arabia from the vicinity of modern Kuwait to Bahrain; the island of Bahrain; the island of Failaka east of Kuwait - few researchers have taken into account the radically different geography of the basin represented by the Persian Gulf before its reflooding as sea levels rose about 6000 BCE.[20]
 
In 1987, Theresa Howard-Carter proposed that Dilmun of this era might be a still unidentified tell near the Shatt al-Arab between modern-day Qurnah and Basra in modern day Iraq.[21] In favor of Howard-Carter's proposal, it has been noted that this area does lie to the east of Sumer ("where the sun rises"), and the riverbank where Dilmun's maidens would have been accosted aligns with theShat al-Arab which is in the midst of marshes. The "mouth of the rivers" where Dilmun was said to lie is for her the union of the Tigris and Euphrates at Qurnah.
As of 2008, archaeologists have failed to find a site in existence during the time from 3300 BC (Uruk IV) to 556 BC (Neo-Babylonian Era), when Dilmun appears in texts. According to Hojlund, no settlements exist in the Gulf littoral dating to 3300-2000 BC. Thus in 2008, archaeologists failed to find a site for Dilmun dating to the time period in which Dilmun first appears in ancient texts (3300-2000 BC). However recently, it was discovered that in 2000 B.C., Mesopotamians inhabited Failaka island.[22] Failaka had many Mesopotamian-style buildings typical of those found in Iraq dating from around 2000 B.C.[22]
 
Garden of Eden theory
 
In 1922, Eduard Glaser proposed that the Garden of Eden was located in Eastern Arabia within the Dilmun civilization.[23]Scholar Juris Zarins also believes that the Garden of Eden was situated in Dilmun at the head of the Persian Gulf, where the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers run into the sea, from his research on this area using information from many different sources, including Landsat images from space. In this theory, the Bible’s Gihon River would correspond with the Karun River in Iran, and the Pishon River would correspond to the Wadi Batin river system that once drained the now dry, but once quite fertile central part of the Arabian Peninsula.[24]
 
References:

1. Jump up^ The former is the reconstructed Sumerian pronunciation; the latter, the reconstructed Semitic.

2. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e Jesper Eidema, Flemming Højlundb (1993). Trade or diplomacy? Assyria and Dilmun in the eighteenth century BC 24 (3). pp. 441–448.

3.  "Dilmun and Its Gulf Neighbours". Harriet E. W. Crawford. 1998. p. 9.

4.  "Egypt's Making: The Origins of Ancient Egypt 5000-2000 BC". Michael Rice. 1991. p. 230.

5.  "The Invention of Cuneiform: Writing in Sumer". Jean-Jacques Glassner. 1990. p. 7.

6.  "Area Handbook for the Persian Gulf States". Richard F. Nyrop. 2008. p. 11. "From about 4000 to 2000 B.C. the civilization of Dilmun dominated 250 miles of the eastern coast of Arabia from present-day Kuwait to Bahrain and extended sixty miles into the interior to the oasis of Hufuf (see fig. 2)."

7.  "Prehistory and Protohistory of the Arabian Peninsula: Bahrain". M. A. Nayeem. 1990. p. 32.

8. a b P. T. H. Unwin; Tim Unwin (18 June 1996). Wine and the Vine: An Historical Geography of Viticulture and the Wine Trade. Psychology Press. pp. 80–. ISBN 978-0-415-14416-2. Retrieved 31 May 2011.

9. a b Tigay, Jeffrey H. (2002) "The Evolution of the Gilgamesh Myth" (http://books.google.de/books?id=cxjuHTH6I2sC&pg=PA78&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false.) accessed 2.09.2013
10.    Jump up^ "Bahrain digs unveil one of oldest civilisations". BBC.

11. a b "Qal'at al-Bahrain – Ancient Harbour and Capital of Dilmun". UNESCO. Retrieved 17 August 2011.

12. a b Edward Conklin. Getting Back Into the Garden of Eden. p. 10.
13.    Jump up^ "Dilmun and Its Gulf Neighbours". Harriet E. W. Crawford. 1998. p. 152.

14. Crawford, Harriet E. W. (1998). Dilmun and its Gulf neighbours. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 5. ISBN 0-521-58348-9.

15. The Sumerians: their history, culture, and character p. 308, Samuel Noah Kramer, 1963.

16. a b Larson, Curtis E. (1983). Life and land use on the Bahrain Islands: The geoarcheology of an ancient society. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. pp. 50–51. ISBN 0-226-46905-0.

17. Mojtahed-Zadeh, Pirouz (1999). Security and Territoriality in the Persian Gulf: A Maritime Political Geography. Richmond, Surrey: Curzon. ISBN 0-7007-1098-1.

18. he UK Register, Science, Lost ancient civilisation's ruins lie beneath Gulf, By Lewis Page Science, December 9, 2010

19. Thorkild Jacobsen (23 September 1997). The Harps that once--: Sumerian poetry in translation, p. 150. Yale University Press. ISBN 978-0-300-07278-5. Retrieved 2 July 2011.

20.     "8000 years BP": Jeffrey Rose, "New light on human prehistory in the Arabo-Persian Gulf oasis" Current Anthropology 51.6 (December 2010)

21. Howard-Carter, Theresa (1987). "Dilmun: At Sea or Not at Sea? A Review Article". Journal of Cuneiform Studies 39 (1): 54–117. doi:10.2307/1359986. JSTOR 1359986.

22.    a b "Traders from Ur?". Archaeology Magazine. Retrieved 28 August 2013.

23.     W. F. Albright (October 1922). "The Location of the Garden of Eden". The American Journal of Semitic Languages and Literatures 39 (1): 15–31.

24. Hamblin, Dora Jane (May 1987). "Has the Garden of Eden been located at last?" (PDF). Smithsonian Magazine 18 (2). Retrieved 8 January 2014.

-----------------------------------------------------------
 
Gerrha (Chaldean Bahrain)



Prior to Gerrha or Hagar , the area belonged to the Dilmun civilization, which was conquered by the Assyrian Empire in 709 BC. Gerrha was the center of an Chaldean kingdom from approximately 650 BC to circa 300 AD . The kingdom was attacked by Antiochus III the Great in 205-204 BC, though it seems to have survived. It is currently unknown exactly when Gerrha fell, but the area was under Sassanid Persian control after 300 AD.

Gerrha was described by Strabo(64 BC – ca. AD 24) as inhabited by Chaldean exiles from Babylon, who built their houses of salt and repaired them by the application of salt water. Pliny the Elder (lust. Nat. vi. 32) says it was 5 miles in circumference with towers built of square blocks of salt.

Various identifications of the site have been attempted, Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d'Anville choosing Qatif, Carsten Niebuhr preferring Kuwait and C Forster suggesting the ruins at the head of the bay behind the islands of Bahrain.
 
History

“Encyclopædia Britannica”

Chaldea, also spelled Chaldaea, Assyrian Kaldu, Babylonian Kasdu, Hebrew Kasddim, land in southern Babylonia (modern southern Iraq) frequently mentioned in the Old Testament. Strictly speaking, the name should be applied to the land bordering the head of the Persian Gulf between the Arabian desert and the Euphrates delta.
Chaldea is first mentioned in the annals of the Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II (reigned 884/883–859 bc), though earlier documents referred to the same area as the “Sealand.” In 850 Shalmaneser III of Assyria raided Chaldea and reached the Persian Gulf, which he called the “Sea of Kaldu.” On the accession of Sargon II to the Assyrian throne (721), the Chaldean Marduk-apla-iddina II (the biblical Merodach-baladan), ruler of Bit-Yakin (a district of Chaldea), seized the Babylonian throne and, despite Assyrian opposition, held it from 721 to 710. He finally fled, however, and Bit-Yakin was placed under Assyrian control.

With this decline of Assyrian power, a native governor, Nabopolassar, was able, in 625, to become king of Babylon by popular consent and to inaugurate a Chaldean dynasty that lasted until the Persian invasion of 539 bc. The prestige of his successors, Nebuchadrezzar II (reigned 605–562) and Nabonidus (reigned 556–539), was such that “Chaldean” became synonymous with “Babylonian.”
“Chaldean” also was used by several ancient authors to denote the priests and other persons educated in the classical Babylonian literature, especially in traditions of astronomy and astrology.


“The Penguin Encyclopedia of Ancient Civilization” / Arthur Cotterell
“Throughout the remainder of the 8th century BC Babylonian Political life was disturbed by the Chaldeans, a Semitic speaking group of people who had entered the plain earlier and who were now settled along the coast of the Persian Gulf. One tribe of Chaldeans, Yakin, produced an eminently capable leader called Merodach-baladan, who with Elamite support made numerious attempts to seize the Babylonian crown…”


"The Sealand of Ancient Arabia" / Raymond Philip Dougherty /Yale University / Vol. XIX, 1932
“However, the existence of numerous Chaldeans, Arameans, and Sealanders outside the land of the two rivers should not be forgotten" Streek regards ("das gewaltige 'vom Meere' heranruckende de Heer" as composed of the people of the Sealand, i.e., the Chaldeans and the Arameans) "Since the Sealand gave rise to the Neo-Babylonian [Chaldean] Empire and since there are strong reasons for association of the Sealand with Arabia, evidence of Neo-Babylonian contact with Arabia should be of special significance.”


“The Babylonians” / H.W.F Saggs
“… the Chaldeans as originally encountered were restricted to south Babylonia, and always remained predominant there…”
Later he says:
“… there is no hint of any non-Semitic linguistic background, but this does not preclude the possibility that their ancestry included elements from earlier groups who had ruled the south of the country, or from the Kassites. Some scholars suggest that they were originally of east Arabia origin; there is little positive evidence for this, but it is not impossible, and if they came in via the west coast of the Persian Gulf it might explain why they were in the main only in the south of Mesopotamia.”


“Orientalia Lovaniensia Analecta; Languages and Cultures in contact at the Crossroads of Civilizations in the Syro-Mesopotamian Realm. (Proceedings of the 42nd RAI)” / I. Sassmannshausen

“It may be a matter of dispute whether the Babylonian society has to be considered a multicultural society. It certainly was a multiethnic society. In the Kassite period the population of Babylonia consisted, of course, mainly of Babylonians (The Babylonian designation for the Babylonians was akkadu "Akkadian"), but quite numerous were also Kassites and Hurrians. Other attested ethnic minorities were Western Semites (ahlamu and amurru), Assyrians, Elamites, Hittites, Lullubeans and people from Ullipi.”

The Kassite period in Babylon was during 1570-1160 BC, and this scholar who presented his paper in front of the most famous in the field, mentioned some of the ethnic groups in Babylon in that period but did not mention the Chaldeans! Which proves the already known fact that the Chaldeans began to settle in southern Mesopotamia around the 10th century BC coming from the Sea Land perhaps (the Persian Gulf region).


"Early Mesopotamia: Society and Economy at the Dawn of History" / J.N. Postgate

“His (Hammurabi) stele lists proudly the ancient centers of civilization, north and south, which the gods had entrusted to his rule: including Assur, Mari and an ancient Hurrian center, Ninua, the later capital of Assyria. This political success was not just another of the swings of the political pendulum, but represents a turning point. Even if more by default than otherwise, Babylon takes on the role of the single capital of the south: only the 1st Dynasty of Babylon remains as a dynastic line, and despite a murmur of resistance from Larsa, the only contenders for power in the future would be outsiders: the Sea-Land Dynasty, the Kassites and, still later, the new nomadic stock of the Aramaeans and Chaldeans.”
Watch the video: Roads of Arabia Documentar (Dilmun & Gerrha)
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/proxy/C7CTqV5CdCAt9j2gnrdrA9LOR1ezE-2kfJ2cKHCfODupC4bGk4KmOKPrwiHIHsbBmarGGaDRVm1yFJwoBwhFPWgLzA=w506-h284-n
Dilmun (Sumerian Bahrain) Dilmun or Telmun was a civilization in ancient Bahrain . Dilmun was an important trading centre which at the height of its power co...
17 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/114773318620837770174 Ushebtis Egipcios : Egypt asks Ashmolean museum to lend it personal collection of Howard Carter.
Egypt asks Ashmolean museum to lend it personal collection of Howard Carter.
Egypt asks Ashmolean museum to lend it personal collection of Howard Carter | Cairo Post
CAIRO: Tourism Promotion Authority (TPA) submitted a request to the Ashmolean museum of Art and Archaeology in Oxford to borrow the currently on display personal collectibles of the original records, drawings and photographs of Howard Carter, who discovered the tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922, ...
17 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/110412314101169962448 Hyperallergic : Discovering Tutankhamun With Photographer Harry Burton In 1922, the Egyptologist Howard Carter asked...
Discovering Tutankhamun With Photographer Harry Burton

In 1922, the Egyptologist Howard Carter asked the Metropolitan Museum of Art to lend him the services of Harry Burton, a photographer then working for the Museum's Egyptian expedition.
Discovering Tutankhamun with Photographer Harry Burton
In 1922, the Egyptologist Howard Carter asked the Metropolitan Museum of Art to lend him the services of Harry Burton, a photographer then working for the Museum's Egyptian expedition.
20 days ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/108540370892543860482 Guardian Stewardship Editions : Visit the +Ashmolean Museum  at the University of Oxford: Discovering #tutankhamun   will tell the story...
Visit the +Ashmolean Museum  at the University of Oxford: Discovering #tutankhamun   will tell the story of one of the most significant archaeological discoveries of the 20th century. Find out more about the hunt for the tomb and the thrill of its discovery, and see Howard Carter’s original records, drawings and photographs.  +Oxford University 
Exhibitions: Discovering Tutankhamun - Ashmolean Museum
Discovering Tutankhamun. 'At last have made wonderful discovery in Valley a magnificent tomb with seals intact…' Howard Carter's telegram to Lord Carnarvon on 5 November 1922. Our summer exhibition Discovering Tutankhamun will tell the story of one of the most significant archaeological ...
21 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/116006413389216515707 Jeff Dennis : Everybody knows that the tomb of King Tut, the greatest find in Egyptian archaeology, was discovered...
Everybody knows that the tomb of King Tut, the greatest find in Egyptian archaeology, was discovered by British Egyptologist Howard Carter.  But you may not have known that Carter was probably gay, and Lord Porchester, his friend and benefactor, definitely gay.
King Tut's Tomb Was Discovered by Two Gay Men

23 days ago - Via Community - View -
https://plus.google.com/106529380822715378860 Nick Owen : King Tut Royal Horse Gold #Tutankhamun Follow #Agababy please only if you want Friend
King Tut Royal Horse
Gold
#Tutankhamun

Follow #Agababy please only if you want Friend
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-hqf6cFph2x4/U5shZHBi60I/AAAAAAACB0c/37u8eLPl-Ak/w506-h750/king%2Btut%2Broyal%2Bhorse.jpg
25 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/115090979697600309773 Howard Carter :

Minnie's List Recommended Festivals | Minnie's List of Metaphysical South Florida
In our last addition of the Summer series, we went over vacationing spots and now we’re presenting some festivals & conferences to plan for this summer and
26 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/104222045912198240691 Brown CS Department : CS concentrator Howard Carter and other Brown, RISD students create an innovative entry for Solar Decathlon...
CS concentrator Howard Carter and other Brown, RISD students create an innovative entry for Solar Decathlon Europe: http://buff.ly/1zmSy2O
30 days ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/105241030046990549077 Basab Barua : The intention was to visit the newly opened exhibition, based around Howard Carter's memorable opening...
The intention was to visit the newly opened exhibition, based around Howard Carter's memorable opening of Tutankhamun's tomb in Egypt's Valley of The Kings in 1922. Carter was meticulous in his documentation, his sketches and drawings of his findings were donated posthumously to the Griffith Institute in Oxford by his niece. The bulk of this exhibition is from the Institute's collection.
Carter had been a sickly child, had been home-schooled and had shown an early artistic streak which had been encouraged by his father, a successful artist. At the age of 17, his interest in Egyptology and his father's contacts enabled him to start as an archaeological artist, and his scholarship despite his lack of formal education as well as a period of tutelage under the redoubtable antiquarian and archaeologist, Flinders Petrie, secured him a post as an archaeologist with the Egyptian Antiquities Service. When he resigned from the post, he was snapped up by The 5th Earl of Carnarvon, an amateur Egyptologist, who had started to over-winter in Luxor for health reasons and who had secured the concession to excavate around Thebes.
Carnarvon was more than a sleeping partner; he managed to secure access to the area that finally yielded the treasures, and also used his contacts with the American Egyptologists from The Metropolitan Museum in New York who were excavating nearby to co-opt Harry Burton, their English photographer, to take the 1400 photographs that now also form part of the Griffith Institute collection.
Carter took a year and a half from discovering the steps leading down to the burial chamber to finally opening the last of the sarcophagi to reveal the boy king's mummy. It took another decade to painstakingly document, draw and photograph the contents of the four rooms and Carter would now launch a second career, giving lectures and talks about The Amarna period of The New Kingdom.
The exhibition starts with Carter and Burton's meticulous work following Flinders Petrie's teachings, documenting every step of the exploration.The second gallery explores the remarkable effect on fine and decorative art of the "Roaring Twenties" by the publication of the early Burton photos in The Times. The last gallery takes the viewer through some remarkable artefacts, jewellery, wall paintings and sculptures of The Amarna Period which starts with Tutankhamun's putative father, Akhenaten, and overlaps and follows on after his brief suzerainty.
Portrayal of the human form from this period, with the long-necked portraits and the evolution from the sexually ambiguous figures of Akhen to the more naturalistic portrayals of Tut and his consort reveal a continuity as well as a break from the past.
As only 30% of Carter's finds have been studied in detail to date, another exhibition of the Griffith's work in the future will be awaited by the many whose appetites have been titillated by this curatorial tour de force. 
30 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/111302563486314660286 karen falk brown : Howard Carter 1st person to look into King Tut's tomb
Howard Carter 1st person to look into King Tut's tomb
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-rT2fks96iMY/U9IX6kDCyII/AAAAAAAAyV4/iEnkq3SXjQY/w506-h750/Howard%2BCarter%2B1st%2Bperson%2Bto%2Blook%2Binto%2BKing%2BTut%2527s%2Btomb.jpg
1 month ago - Via Reshared Post - View -