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Most recent 20 results returned for keyword: Giles Coren (Search this on MAP)

https://plus.google.com/118073441692135782024 Interatores : RT Giles Coren: Genius from Peter Brookes this morning. http://buff.ly/1qQDRQp
RT Giles Coren: Genius from Peter Brookes this morning. http://buff.ly/1qQDRQp
Twitter / gilescoren: Genius from Peter Brookes this ...
Connect with your friends — and other fascinating people. Get in-the-moment updates on the things that interest you. And watch events unfold, in real time, from every angle.
1 day ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/103567374569045416677 Cadogan Tate : In case you missed it, earlier this month we lent a hand to +NSPCC to raise over £600,000 at the River...
In case you missed it, earlier this month we lent a hand to +NSPCC to raise over £600,000 at the River Café in London with the help of Giles Coren, Tom Parker Bowles and many of the world's top chefs and restaurateurs. Read the full article here:  http://bit.ly/1s2QQ6q
Cadogan Tate lends a hand to NSPCC to help raise over £600,000
Cadogan Tate appointed “Cadogan Tate was delighted to be appointed as the official transport partner for evening at the river cafe in aid of nspcc.
1 month ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/103567374569045416677 Cadogan Tate : On Sunday we lent a hand to +NSPCC to raise over £600,000 at the River Café in London with the help ...
On Sunday we lent a hand to +NSPCC to raise over £600,000 at the River Café in London with the help of Giles Coren, Tom Parker Bowles and many of the world's top chefs and restaurateurs. Read the full article here:  http://bit.ly/1s2QQ6q
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-2PzUtnv1WGc/U5cfw9-B2aI/AAAAAAAAAdQ/CFMM6nVvaQU/w506-h750/An+Evening+at+The+River+Cafe+in+aid+of+the+NSPCC.jpg
1 month ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/114305743809801872261 Jerry Merritt : FOOD! The Supersizers Go... "The 'Twenties" The Supersizers Go... "The 'Twenties" Columnist and Restaurant...
FOOD! The Supersizers Go... "The 'Twenties"
The Supersizers Go...
"The 'Twenties"

Columnist and Restaurant Critic Giles Coren, together with writer and broadcaster Sue Perkins, goes on a journey to discover the culinary delights of the bright young things in the 1920’s.

| Not Rated | 59:21
FOOD! The Supersizers Go... "The 'Twenties"

2 months ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/114305743809801872261 Jerry Merritt : FOOD! The Supersizers Go... "Regency" The Supersizers Go... "Regency" Restaurant Critic Giles Coren...
FOOD! The Supersizers Go... "Regency"
The Supersizers Go...
"Regency"

Restaurant Critic Giles Coren and writer and performer Sue Perkins spend a week on a diet spanning the Regency Years of 1789 – 1821. With Rosemary Shrager cooking for them at their country manor house, they enjoy the t...
FOOD! The Supersizers Go... "Regency"

2 months ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/118009201334289719206 Early Oak Reproductions : Oak Table in Tudor Kitchen One of our handmade oak tables, in the #Tudor kitchen of Sutton House, Hackney...
Oak Table in Tudor Kitchen
One of our handmade oak tables, in the #Tudor kitchen of Sutton House, Hackney. Owned by the #NationalTrust this is the oldest surviving building in the borough and the kitchen is regularly used for #historic food demonstrations.

It's also a favourite backdrop for TV and film, including the 'Supersizers Eat' series, where Giles Coren and Sue Perkins (of Great British Bake Off), spent a week preparing and eating food, based on 16th century practices.
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-Tmb-ias_byo/U2yJlHHInHI/AAAAAAAABK8/KJ3oGNE5Gu4/w506-h750/2014%2B-%2B1
2 months ago - Via Community - View -
https://plus.google.com/106407033016171080721 Mother and Baby UK : Giles Coren thinks that parenting is one big party - were you up half the night with your little one...
Giles Coren thinks that parenting is one big party - were you up half the night with your little one? Do you agree?

http://ow.ly/wfsg
Giles Coren: ‘Parenting Is The Best Party Of Them All’
Balancing work and life is all about getting the boring bits done, so you can spend time on what really matters, says our dad-in-residence
2 months ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/114305743809801872261 Jerry Merritt : FOOD! The Supersizers Go... "The 'Eighties" The Supersizers Go... "The 'Eighties" Living in a converted...
FOOD! The Supersizers Go... "The 'Eighties"
The Supersizers Go...
"The 'Eighties"

Living in a converted loft on the Thames, Restaurant critic Giles Coren and performer and broadcaster Sue Perkins go back to the 1980’s and the years of their adolescence, sampling the high life of a couple of yuppie...
FOOD! The Supersizers Go... "The 'Eighties"

2 months ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/106407033016171080721 Mother and Baby UK : And this is why we love Giles Coren and agree with everything he says.. http://ow.ly/vVsLq
And this is why we love Giles Coren and agree with everything he says..

http://ow.ly/vVsLq
Giles Coren: ‘Us Dads Think We’re Clever. Mums Actually Are’
It’s time to face the facts, says Giles – women are the smarter sex when it comes to, well, everything about parenting
3 months ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/114619770561453446258 Crucial PR : Giles Coren V journalists. Round 2 http://ow.ly/vKPeC
Giles Coren V journalists. Round 2 http://ow.ly/vKPeC
Journalists are the least well-read people, writes Giles Coren in The Times
His special target are 'big, important, prize-winning columnists'
3 months ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/104083893711681230577 FoodieOnTour : Latest Review - the brand new Oxford Kitchen in Summertown (yes, the one Giles Coren slammed)
Latest Review - the brand new Oxford Kitchen in Summertown (yes, the one Giles Coren slammed)
#OxTweatUp at The Oxford Kitchen

3 months ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/114305743809801872261 Jerry Merritt : FOOD! The Supersizers Go... "The 'Fifties" The Supersizers Go... "The 'Fifties" Restaurant critic Giles...
FOOD! The Supersizers Go... "The 'Fifties"
The Supersizers Go...
"The 'Fifties"

Restaurant critic Giles Coren and broadcaster Sue Perkins go back to the 1950’s, an era where we started on rations and ended by Prime Minister Harold MacMillan remarking that “we’d never had it so good.”

Season 2 ...
FOOD! The Supersizers Go... "The 'Fifties"

3 months ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/118017127628420340750 Lilium Candidum : '....Mention "charm" and everyone gets interested. Often, people get annoyed. You can win friends with...
'....Mention "charm" and everyone gets interested. Often, people get annoyed. You can win friends with charm, but this most delightful subject can also be a reliable way of starting an argument. 

Yesterday, I shared a BBC lift with Polly Toynbee to our shared destiny at the Today studio. When I told her my subject, she brightened up and said that the very brainy Isaiah Berlin always made people feel as intelligent as he was. 

Was Berlin patronising or charming? He was perhaps a bit of each. Charm makes other people feel good about themselves. And who doesn't want to feel better than they did heretofore? You know you have been charmed if you are enjoying someone's company. And want more of it. 

But charm also contains elements of sinister manipulation. The charmer works like a psychopath. Albert Camus said it was the ability to make someone say "yes"... without actually having asked a question. And there is veiled aggression, too: the "charm offensive" has a military character. In his new book on Kim Philby, Ben Macintyre says: "Beneath Philby's golden charm lay a thick substratum of conceit; the charmer invites you into his world, though never too far, and only on his terms." 

And then there is the whiff of eros attending it: to charm the pants off someone locates the subject in its ancient history of magic spells and incantations. Charm gives you influence. The ability to weave baskets has, I am guessing, rarely got the pants off anyone. 

Charm is an essential tool, or perhaps a weapon, in the conduct of romance or business. So, who would not want it? One thing you never, ever hear someone say is "I wish I were less charming." Apart from the sardonic response of "charming" to an act that was no such thing (being sick on the carpet, for example), almost every reference to charm is a positive one. 

But what exactly is charm? There is not a check-list you can tick. It's more a state-of-mind than a list of specific attributes. To be charming, you need to listen, but not be mute. You lead the conversation, but do not dominate it. You may have a severe lightness of touch. You are in charge, but do not appear so. Self-deprecation is a part of it: but to self-deprecate you need to have a titanium-solid ego in the first place. 

These ideas about soft control we acquired from one of the first books of management science, Baldassare Castiglione's Book of the Courtier (1528). Here we read that it's always best to let your opponent win at tennis, because that puts you in psychological command! 

The English and French are very charming. David Niven and Maurice Chevalier come readily to mind. Interestingly, the Italians have no word for "charm" and need to resort to the French to express the idea. Less surprisingly, there is no German equivalent: the nearest is "zauberformel" which means magic spell. Significantly, someone told me: "Your book will not sell in Glasgow. They don't like charm there." 

Perhaps we need to be as sceptical as the Glaswegians: too much charm can become unattractive. Revealing some personal disappointments, the novelist Anita Brookner once said that "any man so charming must be a liar". Indeed, "charmer" is a synonym for cad. Lay it on too thick and charm becomes smarm: an attractive quality becomes oleaginous, deterrent and repulsive. But all human transactions are founded on such nice distinctions. 

Charm Schools are a thing of the past, though I am told that one is being set up in Beijing. The Chinese know a good thing when they see it. They know that charm deodorises the stench of testosterone and lubricates every transaction. Someone asked me what should be on the syllabus? I said that charm students should be made to study the George Clooney Nespresso ads. 

Charm, by Stephen Bayley, is out now as an ebook (HarperCollins, £2.99) or audio download read by the author (£9.99) 

Charming: (adj.) to be alluring or pleasing; to attract or delight 

Ask yourself: dinner with George Clooney or Simon Cowell? There cannot be any debate, writes Stephen Bayley. And speaking of the charmless, would they be more successful if less spitting and less spite were involved in their presentation of themselves? 

Perhaps Dyson and Coren would be more attractive if they camouflaged their voracious, energy-sucking egos with a coat of respect for and an interest in others. Would Green be even more rich if he were less rude? The great thing about being charming is that it helps you to win. And even if you lose, the charming person still feels good about himself. I think the charmless should reflect on that. 

Charming 

George Clooney 
The Earl of March 
Hugh Grant 
David Beckham 
Colin Firth 
Lapo Elkann 
Stuart Rose 
David Cameron 
Yotam Ottolenghi 
Jony Ive 

Charmless 

Lord Peter Mandelson 
Philip Green 
Ed Balls 
Gordon Ramsay 
Sir Alex Ferguson 
James Dyson 
Giles Coren 
Matthew Freud 
Lord Rennard''
It's become a synonym for manipulation but shouldn't we all be a bit more charming?
Mention "charm" and everyone gets interested. Often, people get annoyed. You can win friends with charm, but this most delightful subject can also be a reliable way of starting an argument.
4 months ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/103028459671171670815 alias inkhorn : '....Mention "charm" and everyone gets interested. Often, people get annoyed. You can win friends with...
'....Mention "charm" and everyone gets interested. Often, people get annoyed. You can win friends with charm, but this most delightful subject can also be a reliable way of starting an argument. 

Yesterday, I shared a BBC lift with Polly Toynbee to our shared destiny at the Today studio. When I told her my subject, she brightened up and said that the very brainy Isaiah Berlin always made people feel as intelligent as he was. 

Was Berlin patronising or charming? He was perhaps a bit of each. Charm makes other people feel good about themselves. And who doesn't want to feel better than they did heretofore? You know you have been charmed if you are enjoying someone's company. And want more of it. 

But charm also contains elements of sinister manipulation. The charmer works like a psychopath. Albert Camus said it was the ability to make someone say "yes"... without actually having asked a question. And there is veiled aggression, too: the "charm offensive" has a military character. In his new book on Kim Philby, Ben Macintyre says: "Beneath Philby's golden charm lay a thick substratum of conceit; the charmer invites you into his world, though never too far, and only on his terms." 

And then there is the whiff of eros attending it: to charm the pants off someone locates the subject in its ancient history of magic spells and incantations. Charm gives you influence. The ability to weave baskets has, I am guessing, rarely got the pants off anyone. 

Charm is an essential tool, or perhaps a weapon, in the conduct of romance or business. So, who would not want it? One thing you never, ever hear someone say is "I wish I were less charming." Apart from the sardonic response of "charming" to an act that was no such thing (being sick on the carpet, for example), almost every reference to charm is a positive one. 

But what exactly is charm? There is not a check-list you can tick. It's more a state-of-mind than a list of specific attributes. To be charming, you need to listen, but not be mute. You lead the conversation, but do not dominate it. You may have a severe lightness of touch. You are in charge, but do not appear so. Self-deprecation is a part of it: but to self-deprecate you need to have a titanium-solid ego in the first place. 

These ideas about soft control we acquired from one of the first books of management science, Baldassare Castiglione's Book of the Courtier (1528). Here we read that it's always best to let your opponent win at tennis, because that puts you in psychological command! 

The English and French are very charming. David Niven and Maurice Chevalier come readily to mind. Interestingly, the Italians have no word for "charm" and need to resort to the French to express the idea. Less surprisingly, there is no German equivalent: the nearest is "zauberformel" which means magic spell. Significantly, someone told me: "Your book will not sell in Glasgow. They don't like charm there." 

Perhaps we need to be as sceptical as the Glaswegians: too much charm can become unattractive. Revealing some personal disappointments, the novelist Anita Brookner once said that "any man so charming must be a liar". Indeed, "charmer" is a synonym for cad. Lay it on too thick and charm becomes smarm: an attractive quality becomes oleaginous, deterrent and repulsive. But all human transactions are founded on such nice distinctions. 

Charm Schools are a thing of the past, though I am told that one is being set up in Beijing. The Chinese know a good thing when they see it. They know that charm deodorises the stench of testosterone and lubricates every transaction. Someone asked me what should be on the syllabus? I said that charm students should be made to study the George Clooney Nespresso ads. 

Charm, by Stephen Bayley, is out now as an ebook (HarperCollins, £2.99) or audio download read by the author (£9.99) 

Charming: (adj.) to be alluring or pleasing; to attract or delight 

Ask yourself: dinner with George Clooney or Simon Cowell? There cannot be any debate, writes Stephen Bayley. And speaking of the charmless, would they be more successful if less spitting and less spite were involved in their presentation of themselves? 

Perhaps Dyson and Coren would be more attractive if they camouflaged their voracious, energy-sucking egos with a coat of respect for and an interest in others. Would Green be even more rich if he were less rude? The great thing about being charming is that it helps you to win. And even if you lose, the charming person still feels good about himself. I think the charmless should reflect on that. 

Charming 

George Clooney 
The Earl of March 
Hugh Grant 
David Beckham 
Colin Firth 
Lapo Elkann 
Stuart Rose 
David Cameron 
Yotam Ottolenghi 
Jony Ive 

Charmless 

Lord Peter Mandelson 
Philip Green 
Ed Balls 
Gordon Ramsay 
Sir Alex Ferguson 
James Dyson 
Giles Coren 
Matthew Freud 
Lord Rennard''
It's become a synonym for manipulation but shouldn't we all be a bit more charming?
Mention "charm" and everyone gets interested. Often, people get annoyed. You can win friends with charm, but this most delightful subject can also be a reliable way of starting an argument.
4 months ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/118062049794402478407 Niamh McShane : It's the middle of March, the afternoon sun is shining, the birds are singing, everyone with half a ...
It's the middle of March, the afternoon sun is shining, the birds are singing, everyone with half a bit of sense is drinking beer in the park... and there is a little crazy sweaty Irish girl dancing around her room with the curtains pulled grinning from ear to ear; fervently hoping that no one in her building can see through walls...

as you might have guessed, I had a gooood day :)

I woke up bright and early after a surprisingly enjoyable and relaxing evening babysitting my cousin; which largely involved reading an excellent novel, drinking O'Connor's Cream tea (a whisky flavoured black tea that is mindblowingly delish!) and nibbling on some very nice parma ham.

After a slightly rushed breakfast (20 mins compared to the usual hour or so of lazing about languidly avoiding 'The List'... I am an obsessive compulsive List Lady) I accompanied my Auntie Astrid to a Lecture which is part of the maaaassive Lit.Cologne Festival happening at the moment. As she is one of the organisers I got to meet the Journalist, Thomas Feibel who would be reading from his new book beforehand and he informed his favourite thing about Dublin was Wagamamas.. Although I completely understand the waga-fetish, I don't know if I would agree that a chain of Japanese inspired fast food restaurants is really what makes Dublin so particularly great.. However, as it turned out he is actually the funniest, nerdiest, coolest Journo (apart from maybe Giles Coren who is the KING) I've ever had the pleasure of watching :)

The morning lectures were mainly aimed at a younger crowd, kid Lit etc, but of the two I got to see; they were really brilliant! There was a slightly earlier reading by a Turkish/German author who wrote a children's book 'Oma's Teekanne in Kreta/ Granny's Tea Pot in Crete' which kind of approached the idea of national identity and displacement but from a child's perspective; i.e, calling two or more places 'Home' due to moving country. For me, it was a really sweet concept that sort of struck a personal chord. The cutest scene in the book was right at the start where granny and Laila are planting veggies out in the garden and Laila explains how Granny has told her that the vegetables that they are planting will be happy to be planted in any part of the vegetable plot, even if they are uprooted and re-planted they will feel at home, but people; they don't bloom so well when they're uprooted; people are different. Such an adorable metaphor I thought?

Of course... that's not the reason I was dancing like a maniac, lovely as the morning was, my day got even better :)

The first thing I did when I got home (after attempting to sort out some SHITE with the uni about courses.. although I've got used to Erasmus admin heart-break so I don't really care) was get the shopping; got all my wee healthy-freak bits and pieces and trotted home carrying about 10 kilos of veggies on my back. I got into my room, popped on a cup of chai and started my laptop.. I still hadn't heard back about an essay that I'd wanted to do well in so i sent off an email to the lecturer, ate an entire packet of strawberries, threw on my running gear and galloped round the park. 

Feeling already pretty sweet about my gathering paceyness, I refreshed my emails and this is what I found.. 'Your grade for the essay is 72% - well done, it was a terrific piece of writing.'

Now, to some that may sound like just a piece of good-ish news, but to me, after the run and the nice morning, I just felt.. like a CHAMPION/ Cue; rocky music in my head, uncontrollable grinning and dancing like I'm out on day release :)

I know what you're thinking, what a ridiculous anti-climax.. but honestly, it made my day!

In fact I felt so confident, I even asked my tickled-pink neighbour what the cackling was all about (Big Balls McShane) and he explained he watches a funny TV show in his room... I suppose that's acceptable :) Sure on a day like today, he could be howling through my keyhole and I wouldn't give a shite!

Feeling Geee-r8, and planning on more running tomorrow, visiting a used book store so I can get a move on with reading the set texts before semester starts, and going to the FIRST Official Erasmus Get-Together, where I should definitely meet some decent amigos! Haven't a notion what to wear.. I can imagine there will be some serious outfit uncertainty going on about this time tomorrow, but that will all be in my next ramble!

Ciao for now! 
Niamh :) x
4 months ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/101683614818422586803 Harriet Ruff : The [Pop Up] Smokehouse @ The O Bar - Leicester After Giles Coren's frankly disgusting representation...
The [Pop Up] Smokehouse @ The O Bar - Leicester
After Giles Coren's frankly disgusting representation of Leicester in his recent review of Kayal where he describes restaurants in the city as "staggeringly awful", I vow to dispose of his close minded stubbornness. If you wish to read the delightful articl...
The [Pop Up] Smokehouse @ The O Bar - Leicester

4 months ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/114305743809801872261 Jerry Merritt : FOOD!  The Supersizers Go... "Medieval" The Supersizers Go... "Medieval" Restaurant Critic Giles Coren...
FOOD!  The Supersizers Go... "Medieval"
The Supersizers Go...
"Medieval"
   
Restaurant Critic Giles Coren and performer and broadcaster Sue Perkins go back to Medieval England to live the life of a Lord and Lady in their country manor.

| Not Rated | 59:21
FOOD! The Supersizers Go... "Medieval"

4 months ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/117125169860842262364 Honey Halliwell : This has turned out to be a great series from food critic Giles Coren, and comedienne, Sue Perkins. ...
This has turned out to be a great series from food critic Giles Coren, and comedienne, Sue Perkins. It's a humorous look through British food history. They go for checkups before "traveling" back in time where they spend a week eating actual dishes made in ye olden times. All-the-while, they dress, and experience, the part. At the end of their week, they have another checkup to determine the outcome of that era's diet.

I hope they continue on past what I've seen; their rapport is just phenomenal & the wit totally carries the show.

Enjoy, foodies.

#thesupersizersgo   #british #gilescoren #sueperkins   #foodhistory   #foodie
The Supersizers Go...
In The Supersizers Go..., British restaurant critic, Giles Coren, and comedienne, Sue Perkins, eat their way through history. From Roman times to the French Revolution to the Great War, Giles and Sue eat, live and play for a full week exclusively the way people did back then. Before and after each era of eating, they pay a visit to a doctor to see how there are affected by their new diets. What will your favorite era be?
5 months ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/101623628370947168005 Matt Hickman : Drake's - Hand and Flowers List Dad Guest Post – For the third of these very occasional blogs, I am ...
Drake's - Hand and Flowers
List Dad Guest Post – For the third of these very occasional blogs, I am following the example of Giles Coren and taking a look at two of the best restaurants I have visited outside London. As readers may know, Coren’s crime in the eyes of others was to pub...
Drake's - Hand and Flowers
List Dad Guest Post – For the third of these very occasional blogs, I am following the example of Giles Coren and taking a look at two of the best restaurants I have visited outside London. As readers may know, Coren’s crime ...
5 months ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/111032806480382192972 Kat Richardson : Even in the face of a rather negative response to the ms, I'm feeling remarkably positive. The ms is...
Even in the face of a rather negative response to the ms, I'm feeling remarkably positive. The ms is fixable and I'm grateful to have the feedback--I learn more from mistakes than from success. Usually I'd be hiding under the bed and crying, but something seems to have changed over here at Chez Kat and, in spite of a prickle of disappointment at upsetting friends and not having done as good a job as I'd hoped, I'm still mostly happy. I've spent a lot of the past 5 years panicked, stressed, sick, or depressed, but at the moment--aside from the prospect of doing my taxes, which I always hate, and waiting for the Editorial Letter--things seem... good. Also, laughing at Giles Coren getting his butt struck by lightning seems to have a strong, positive effect. Below find the episode of Supersizers in which Giles is Louis XVI and has an unfriendly encounter with some electricity....
The Supersizers Go...: French Revolution
Giles and Sue journey back to Revolutionary France in the 1780’s to find out what King Louis 16th ate, why Marie-Antoinette was so hated and how the revolution was instrumental in creating the first restaurant and first restaurant critic!
6 months ago - Via Google+ - View -