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Most recent 20 results returned for keyword: Four Saints (Search this on MAP)

https://plus.google.com/103463339499553941312 Pamphlets to Inspire : SS. Alexander I, Pope, Eventius, and Theodulus, Martyrs And Saint Juvenal of Narni, Bishop and Confessor...
SS. Alexander I, Pope, Eventius, and Theodulus, Martyrs And Saint Juvenal of Narni, Bishop and Confessor
Feast Day: May 3rd
(Latin Calendar)

SS. Alexander, Eventius, and Theodulus And St. Juvenal of Narni

A Roman who was named after his father, Alexander, was reportedly born at "Caput Tauri," thought to refer to the area of the Esquiline hill, one of the Seven Hills of Rome. Nothing is known of his life before he took office. He was the bishop of Rome for between seven to ten years in the early second century. According to Catholic tradition, the dates of his episcopacy are estimated from as early as 106-115 and as late as 109-119 A.D. Tradition holds that Alexander I converted the Roman governor Hermes and 1,500 members of his family, servants, and government officials to Christianity. Like all the early popes, he is honored as a saint and a martyr. He was formerly credited with instituting several church traditions, but much of this is now doubted by secular and catholic scholars alike.

According to the Liber Pontificalis, it was Alexander I who inserted the narration of the Last Supper (the Qui pridie) into the Catholic mass. However, in the article on Saint Alexander I in the 1907 Catholic Encyclopedia, Thomas Shahan judges this tradition to be inaccurate. Both Catholic and non-Catholic experts regards this tradition as inaccurate. It is viewed as a product of the agenda of
Liber Pontificalis--this section of the book was probably written in the late fifth century--to show an ancient pattern of the earliest bishops of Rome ruling the church by papal decree.

Pope Alexander I is also said to have introduced the use of blessing water mixed with salt for the purification of Christian homes from evil influences, and the custom of mixing water with the sacramental wine. This too is considered unlikely. Duchesne (Lib. Pont., I, 127) calls attention to the persistence of this early Roman custom by way of a blessing in the Gelasian Sacramentary that recalls very forcibly the actual Asperges prayer at the beginning of Mass. However, it is certainly possible that Alexander, whether acting singly or part of a collective leadership of Rome, played an important part in the governance of the church and the evolution of its emerging liturgical and administrative tradition.

Alexander is cited as having seen a vision of the infant Jesus. In some editions of the Roman Missal the Saint Alexander commemorated om 3May is identified with Pope Alexander I. This identification is not found in the Tridentine Missal promulgated by Pope Pius V in 1570. Since nothing is known of the Saints Alexander, Eventius and Theodulus of 3 May other than their names and the fact that they were martyred and were buried at the seventh milestone of the Via Nomentana on that day, the one whose name coincided with that of a pope was identified as Pope Alexander I.

Both SS. Eventius and Theodulus, were priests in Rome, Italy. They were both imprisoned and martyred with St. Alexander of Rome. Both were burned and beheaded c. 113 on the Via Nomentana in Rome, Italy; their relics are interred in the Dominican Church of Santa Sabrina, Rome. In 1855, a semi--subterranean cemetery of the holy martyrs was discovered near Rome, at the spot where tradition declares the Pope to have been martyred. Archaeologists identified this Alexander as that of the Pope noted above.



Saint Juvenal of Narni

Saint Juvenal (d. May 3, 369 or 377) is venerated as the first Bishop of Narni in Umbria. Historical details regarding Juvenal’s life are limited. A biography of Juvenal of little historical value was written after the seventh century; it states that Juvenal was born in Africa and was ordained by Pope Damasus I and was the first bishop of Narni and was buried in the Porta Superiore on the Via Flaminia on August 7, though his feast day is celebrated on May 3. This Vita does not call him a martyr but calls him a confessor. The martyrologies of Florus of Lyon and Ado describe Juvenal as a bishop and confessor rather than as a martyr.

In the Gelasian Sacramentary there is a prayer in honor of the saint under May 3. The Codex Bernense of the Martyrologium Hieronymianum records his name under May 3 with those of three martyrs of the Via Nomentana: Eventius, Alexander I, and Theodulus. Saint Juvenal appears as a bishop and confessor, in the Tridentine Calendar, which allots him a commemoration, shared with the three martyrs, within the feast of the finding of the Cross on 3 May. When this feast was abolished in 1960, the four saints continued to be merely commemorated jointly within the celebration of the weekday. The same day continues to be Saint Juvenal’s feast day, as indicated in the Roman Martyrology. His legend suggests that he saved Narni from both Ligurian and Sarmatian invaders by calling down a divine thunderstorm.



Image is of Pope Alexander I
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https://plus.google.com/101247028128428915771 Barbara Wells Sarudy : Morning Madonna Unknown Master, Italian (active 1520s in Florence). Virgin and Child with Four Saints...
Morning Madonna
Unknown Master, Italian (active 1520s in Florence). Virgin and Child with Four Saints In this blog, I try to begin each day with a painting of the Madonna & Child. It centers me; connects me to the past; & encourages me to post some of the religious paintin...
Morning Madonna
Unknown Master, Italian (active 1520s in Florence). Virgin and Child with Four Saints In this blog, I try to begin each day with a painting of the Madonna & Child. It centers me; connects me to the past; & encourages me to ...
15 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/116358203964665308761 Grzegorz Karbowski : Man charged with murder in shooting death of Will Smith, ex-Saints player (CNN)A 28-year-old man faces...
Man charged with murder in shooting death of Will Smith, ex-Saints player

(CNN)A 28-year-old man faces a murder charge in the fatal shooting of former New Orleans Saints defensive end Will Smith, New Orleans Police Department spokesman Tyler Gamble said.

The Orleans Parish Sheriff's Office booked Cardell Hayes on second-degree murder charges early Sunday, he said. Bond has not yet been set in the case, and "the investigation is ongoing," Gamble said.

"I don't have any information indicating they knew each other at this time," Gamble told CNN in an email.

Smith, 34, was shot dead Saturday night in an apparent traffic altercation, authorities said.

Hours before the shooting, he tweeted that he was "having a blast" Saturday night at the French Quarter Fest, an annual event in the famed New Orleans district.

Smith's former team confirmed his death, and expressed its condolences.

"A senseless and tragic loss. Our thoughts and prayers are with Will Smith -- his wife Racquel -- his children William, Wynter and Lisa," Greg Bensel, the Saints' vice president of communications, tweeted. "These senseless killings in our city MUST STOP- let's all rally now in earnest in Will Smith's honor & in his name to do something tangible."

Man in custody

New Orleans police said Smith and his wife were both shot in an apparent traffic altercation late Saturday night near Magazine Street in the city's Lower Garden District.

The pair were in their car when a Hummer hit them from behind, causing their car to rear-end another vehicle in front of them.

Smith and the Hummer driver got into a confrontation, police said. The Hummer driver allegedly shot him multiple times and his wife twice in the leg. She was transported to a local hospital.

The Hummer driver stayed on the scene, and is in custody undergoing questioning, police said in a statement.

Abutting the Mississippi River, the neighborhood is known for its historic homes, some of which date back to the early 19th century. Lee Circle, a popular gathering spot during the city's Mardi Gras celebration, sits on the neighborhood's edge.

It's a relatively low-crime area, especially when compared to Central City to its west and the Central Business District and French Quarter to its north. Of more than 500 crimes reported in New Orleans in the last week, only a handful occurred in the Lower Garden District, most of them thefts, though there was one assault reported Friday, according to the city's crime map.

'Nonsense man'

Smith's family posted a message on his Facebook page, saying, "We are thankful for the outpouring of support and prayers. We ask that you continue to respect the family's privacy as they grieve the loss of a devoted husband, father and friend."

Smith's former teammates and other NFL players took to Twitter to mourn his loss.

Mark Ingram, a Heisman-winning running back at Alabama who was drafted by the Saints in 2011, said he was "devastated."

"Lord please be with the Smith family at this tragic time. Nonsense man ...," he tweeted.

Former Saints player Reggie Bush tweeted "life is too short" following reports of Smith's death.

Career

Smith was picked in the first round of the NFL draft and was on the Super Bowl-winning team in 2010.

He ranks fourth among the Saints' all-time sack leaders and is considered one of the franchise's great defensive players.

Before joining New Orleans, the New York native was a standout at Ohio State University, earning All-American honors and helping the school win the BCS championship in 2002.

After college, Smith was selected in the first round by the Saints in 2004 and received a Pro Bowl nomination in 2006. Smith had a career-high 13 sacks in the 2009 regular season, the season the Saints won the Super Bowl.

Two years later, though, he was one of four Saints players caught up in the so-called "bountygate" scandal. Smith was suspended for four games.

He was released by New Orleans in 2014, then briefly signed by the New England Patriots but cut before the season began.

Charitable work

Smith's foundation, Where There's A Will, There's A Way, helped to serve high school athletes in his hometown Utica, New York. He also sat on the advisory board of The Artists and Athletes Alliance.

His last public Facebook post shows him at the United Nations on Wednesday, the same day the world body observed the International Day of Sport for Development and Peace.

He wrote on his personal website that he wanted to be an FBI agent following his football career.
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https://plus.google.com/111429276509442296910 Breaking Duluth News : Our next monthly MinnPost members ticket giveaway will start at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, April 5, and feature...
Our next monthly MinnPost members ticket giveaway will start at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, April 5, and feature the following offers: * Hennepin History Museum - Two pairs of admission passes * The O'Shaughnessy - Two pairs of tickets to Meredith Monk and Vocal Ensemble on April 15. * Friends of the Hennepin County Library - Four pairs to Pen Pals with Anthony Doerr on May 5 or May 6. * Hennepin Theatre Trust - One pair of tickets to Leap of Faith on Friday, April 29 at 7:30 p.m. * VocalEssence - One pair of tickets to Listeners Choice LIVE on April 22 at 8 p.m. * Northrop - One pair of tickets to the Miami City Ballet on April 27 at 7:30 p.m. * Chorus Polaris - Three pairs of tickets to Mozart Vespers on April 24 at 3 p.m. * Park Square Theatre - One pair of vouchers to Six Characters in Search of an Author, running from Apr 19 – May 8, 2016. Tickets are distributed via our partner offers page on a first come, first served basis to MinnPost Gold and Platinum members, who support our work with contributions of $10 or more per month. To take part in this and future giveaways, one must be a MinnPost Gold or Platinum member, have a MinnPost.com user account and be logged in to the site. Those who make a qualifying donation before 9 a.m. April 5 will be eligible to participate in this month's giveaway. Members can create a MinnPost.com user account and verify their login status in advance via our partner offers page. If you have any trouble donating, creating a MinnPost.com user account, logging in, or viewing our partner offers page, please contact us at members@minnpost.com. --- Also, we would like to again thank the partners who provided our March offers: * The Museum of Russian Art * Hennepin History Museum * Minnesota Opera - The Shining * The O'Shaughnessy - Shaun Hopper - Fingerstyle Guitarist * Friends of the St. Paul Public Library - Loud at the Library. * Friends of the Hennepin County Library - Pen Pals with Terry Tempest Williams * Hennepin Theatre Trust - Buyer & Cellar * VocalEssence - Four Saints in Three Acts * Northrop - Mark Morris Dance Group * American Craft Council - American Craft St. Paul Show * Twin Cities Gay Men's Chorus - A Night at Northrop * The Minneapolis Foundation - Graze 4 Good | @MinnPost
April partner offers for MinnPost members announced
Our next monthly MinnPost members ticket giveaway will start at 2 p.m. on April 5, and feature offers from seven partner organizations.
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https://plus.google.com/118415412468821761341 김동훈 : Gareth Harris on Twitter http://flip.it/cQTDq
Gareth Harris on Twitter

http://flip.it/cQTDq
Gareth Harris on Twitter: "?? - Jeff Koons, Gazing Ball (Perugino Madonna and Child with Four Saints), 2014-15, Gagosian @ArtBasel HK "
Not on Twitter? Sign up, tune into the things you care about, and get updates as they happen. Sign upLog in. You won't see these kinds of Tweets next time you're here. You'll see more of these kinds of Tweets every time you're here. You won't see these kinds of Tweets next time you're here.
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https://plus.google.com/104902045873370567549 Noel Glicerio Atud : Join us
Join us
Four Saints That Will Change Your Life - The Pray More Retreat
Four Saints That Will Change Your Life by Tom Perna Click here to download audio file. Click here for a transcript of the video presentation. Click here for a printable study guide for Four Saints That Will Change Your Life. Not Registered for the Pray More Retreat? Click here to Register and receive more talks …
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https://plus.google.com/111429276509442296910 Breaking Duluth News : What kind of opera includes lyrics like “Pigeons on the grass alas”? One with a libretto by Gertrude...
What kind of opera includes lyrics like “Pigeons on the grass alas”? One with a libretto by Gertrude Stein and a score by Virgil Thomson. “Four Saints in Three Acts” (in fact, there are 20 saints, or maybe 30, and four acts) premiered in 1934, became a modernist cause célèbre and ran longer on Broadway than any opera before or since. “Four Saints” will never be a “Carmen” or “Tosca” in terms of popularity, but it has many admirers, including VocalEssence’s Philip Brunelle, who brings the avant-garde milestone to the Cowles for two performances this weekend. Brunelle led his singers in a concert version at the O’Shaughnessy in the late 1970s and has been itching to do a staged production ever since. “It’s been on my brain for so many years,” he said in conversation last week. “And for me, it’s really important that a VocalEssence season be very diverse and have some traditional things and then some things like ‘Four Saints’ that make people go, ‘Oh, that’s unusual.’ ” “Unusual” is an understatement. The opera’s theme, in the words of composer Thomson, who went on to win a Pulitzer Prize, is the “working artist’s working life,” which leaves a lot of wiggle room. There’s no plot, at least not one that anybody has figured out. For Stein, language was a plaything, so the libretto is more about sounds than making sense. The music draws from folk songs, hymns, Sunday-school songs, vaudeville and circus-like melodies. There’s a lightness and brightness to it. “The tunes are so memorable, and the musical is so accessible, so American,” Brunelle said. “It kind of sounds like Aaron Copland, or Charles Ives. It’s very tonal, a very easy-to-assimilate musical language, and then you add this wonderfully bizarre element” – Stein’s words – “on top of it.” And then you add Carl Flink’s creativity and imagination on top of that. Brunelle tapped Flink, artistic director of Black Label Movement, to serve as director and choreographer. Flink brought in some of his movers (dancers) and went to work on the VocalEssence singers, who are not allowed to just stand there and sing. Flink was new to “Four Saints” but felt “immediately drawn to it, because it had this sense of quirkiness and playfulness that was really intriguing. It’s light, it’s whimsical, yet it has this wonderful biting undertone.” It’s also a blank slate for any director because the opera is rarely produced, there’s no one way to approach it and the interpretations are endless. Flink saw that as a challenge and an opportunity. He reached out to Michal Kobialka, a theater historiographer at the U of M, where Flink teaches dance. “We sat down and roamed around ‘What is this opera?’ and ‘What do you do with it?’ One of the things he said was, ‘You need to avoid trying to put it in the box of a narrative. There is story, there is meaning, but if you start making it a linear narrative you’ll lose the serious play of it.’ “It’s a fascinating back-and-forth between allowing meaning to manifest and not holding on to it too hard,” Flink said. “The way our minds digress when we talk, we’re not always laser-focused on what we’re saying. Other things are crackling in our heads. I feel like in some way [Stein] writes that inner mind – that inner world of the mind, and how we don’t just plow through the world in one linear direction.” Not only do the VocalEssence singers have to move among Flink’s movers, they also have to sing the libretto from memory. For that alone they should get big blue ribbons, because it can’t be easy to memorize language like “How many saints can be and land be and sand be and on a high plateau there is no sand there is snow and there is made to be so and very much can be what there is to see when there is a wind to have it dry and be what they can understand to undertake to let it be to send it well as much as none to be to be behind.” That’s a direct quote from Act I. The key, Brunelle said, was “repetition. Every singer said to me, ‘I just had to keep going over and over to get this.’” They started in the fall, and once Flink added movement, it got easier. Brunelle’s tips for enjoying “Four Saints”? “Throw the usual way of conversing out the window and just listen. … It will be great. It’s gonna be fun.” Brunelle noted that “Virgil just accepted Gertrude’s words.” He also created beautiful tunes to carry them. Along with the singers and movers, “Four Saints” will feature a 23-piece orchestra (including an accordion and a harmonium), costumes, set design by Paul Herwig and lighting design by Marcus Dilliard. Performances are Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 4 p.m. in the Goodale Theater at the Cowles Center. Each is preceded by a concert conversation with Brunelle, Flink, Randall Davidson and James Kendrick, head of the New York-based Virgil Thomson Foundation. FMI and tickets ($20/$30). You won’t have many chances in your lifetime to see and hear this live, so you might want to grab the ring. The picks Tonight at the Guthrie: “The Critic” and “The Real Inspector Hound.” One night at the theater, two one-act comedies. This madcap, critics-bashing event pairs Jeffrey Hatcher’s fresh take on Richard Brinsley Sheridan’s “The Critic” with Tom Stoppard’s “The Real Inspector Hound.” Michael Kahn directs a lively collaboration with Washington, D.C.’s Shakespeare Theatre Company. 7:30 p.m. on the proscenium stage. FMI and tickets ($22-$64). Daily (except Mondays); ends March 27.Courtesy of the artistThe Pines Friday at First Avenue: The Pines “Above the Prairie” CD Release. Their unique brand of indie-roots music has been called “dark folk,” “country noir” and “a dusty and often ghostly take on Americana.” Imagine Brian Eno on the Great Plains and you have some idea of the Pines: dreamy, ethereal voices and acoustic instruments layered with ambient sound. “Above the Prairie” is the fourth Red House album for Dave Huckfelt, Benson Ramsey and Alex Ramsey. Their First Ave show will include Michael Lewis on bass and JT Bates on drums, with special guests Phil Cook and Stolyette. 8 p.m. in the mainroom. FMI and tickets ($18). Listen here to “Aerial Ocean.” Saturday on and around St. Paul’s Summit Avenue: Before Bach’s Birthday Bash. Monday is J.S. Bach’s 331st birthday, and his music is more popular than ever. How’s that for longevity? Classical MPR, the Bach Society of Minnesota and the Twin Cities chapter of the American Guild of Organists are co-sponsoring a whole day’s worth of free concerts, starting with a live MPR broadcast from St. Mary’s Chapel of the St. Paul Seminary at 9 a.m. The day’s events will also include a sampler of works by German late-romantic composer Max Reger, who, like countless others, was inspired by Bach. Do the day and you’ll bop around from St. Mary’s Chapel to the University of St. Thomas Chapel, the Episcopal Church of St. Clement and Unity Unitarian Church, ending up at House of Hope Presbyterian Church. Or just drop in at one or more. Here’s the schedule and what you’ll hear at each concert, played by whom on what kinds of instruments. 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Saturday at the Minnesota Museum of American Art Project Space: Gallery Talk: “Material Mythologies” and Contemporary Craft. MMAA’s current show, “Material Mythologies,” features artists working at the edge of contemporary craft and sculpture, using textiles, beading, metal, ceramic and glass to tell stories, communicate personal histories and decode assumptions about craft. Monica Moses, editor in chief of American Craft magazine, and MMAA curator Christopher Atkins will consider the exhibition and touch on topics including the history and impact of the American Craft Council (ACC) and the future of craft in the Twin Cities. The 2016 ACC show opens April 8 at St. Paul’s RiverCentre; this event is a good lead-in to that. 3 p.m. 141 E. 4th St., St. Paul. Free and open to the public; no registration required. Sunday at the Ordway Concert Hall: 93rd Annual Bruce P. Carlson Scholarship Competition Winners Recital. Each spring, the Schubert Club awards some $50,000 to young musicians who live and/or study in Minnesota, Wisconsin, South Dakota, North Dakota or Iowa. Past winners have gone on to positions in the Minnesota Orchestra, LA Philharmonic and Cleveland Orchestra, to name a few. Come hear this year’s winners in the piano, strings, voice, guitar, brass and woodwinds categories. 1 p.m. Free and general admission; no tickets required.   Hot tix We didn’t see this one coming. Jon Anderson, the original singer/songwriter for the supergroup YES, and Jean-Luc Ponty, the international violin superstar whose albums sold millions, have formed the AndersonPonty Band, and they’re playing Burnsville’s Ames Center on Tuesday, May 10. FMI and tickets ($32.50-$79.50). Buy at the box office, save on fees.  Courtesy of the artistsJean-Luc Ponty and Jon Anderson. | @MinnPost
VocalEssence staging quirky, whimsical 'Four Saints in Three Acts'
ALSO: The Pines “Above the Prairie” CD Release at First Avenue; all-day Before Bach’s Birthday Bash in St. Paul; and more.
1 month ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/111429276509442296910 Breaking Duluth News : Our next monthly MinnPost members ticket giveaway will start at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, March 1, and feature...
Our next monthly MinnPost members ticket giveaway will start at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, March 1, and feature the following offers: * The Museum of Russian Art - Admission passes * Hennepin History Museum - Admission passes * Minnesota Opera - Tickets to The Shining * The O'Shaughnessy - Tickets to Shaun Hopper - Fingerstyle Guitarist on Friday, March 18. * Friends of the St. Paul Public Library - Tickets to Loud at the Library. * Friends of the Hennepin County Library - Tickets to Pen Pals with Terry Tempest Williams on Thursday, April 21 or Friday, April 22. * Hennepin Theatre Trust - Tickets to Buyer & Cellar on Friday, April 1 at 7:30 p.m. * VocalEssence - Tickets to Four Saints in Three Acts on Saturday, March 19, 2016 * Northrop - Tickets to the Mark Morris Dance Group on Wednesday, March 30 at 7:30 p.m. * American Craft Council - Tickets to the American Craft St. Paul Show which runs April 8-10 at the St. Paul RiverCentre. * Twin Cities Gay Men's Chorus - Tickets for A Night at Northrop on Saturday, April 2 at 8 p.m. * The Minneapolis Foundation - Tickets to Graze 4 Good at Surly Brewing Co. on Sunday, March 20, at 5 p.m. Tickets are distributed via our partner offers page on a first come, first served basis to MinnPost Gold and Platinum members, who support our work with contributions of $10 or more per month.To take part in this and future giveaways, one must be a MinnPost Gold or Platinum member, have a MinnPost.com user account and be logged in to the site. Those who make a qualifying donation before 9 a.m. March 1 will be eligible to participate in this month's giveaway. Members can create a MinnPost.com user account and verify their login status in advance via our partner offers page. If you have any trouble donating, creating a MinnPost.com user account, logging in, or viewing our partner offers page, please contact us at members@minnpost.com. --- Also, we would like to again thank the partners who provided our February offers: * Friends of the Hennepin County Library, Pen Pals: Jon Meacham * Friends of the Saint Paul Public Library, Loud at the Library * Hennepin History Museum * Hennepin Theatre Trust, 'The How and The Why' * Minnesota Opera, 'Tosca' * Northrop, Jessica Lang Dance * Northrop, The Triplets of Belleville Cine-Concert * Park Square Theatre, 'Nina Simone: Four Women' * The O'Shaughnessy at St. Catherine University, 'A Night in Ancient and New China' * VocalEssence, 'WITNESS: Morehouse College Glee Club' | @MinnPost
March partner offers announced
Our next monthly MinnPost members ticket giveaway will start at 2 p.m. on March 1, and feature 24 offers from 12 partner organizations.
2 months ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/111733542490689434401 Kamesh Kumar : Nalvar History - Four Great Saiva Saints Among all the saints of Saivism, the contribution made by the...
Nalvar History - Four Great Saiva Saints
Among all the saints of Saivism, the contribution made by the four saints - Thirugnanasambandar, Thirunavaukkarasar, Sundarar and Manickavasagar was tremendous. They are referred as Nalvar (means four in Tamil) who played a key role in the revival of Saivis...
Nalvar History - Four Great Saiva Saints
Among all the saints of Saivism, the contribution made by the four saints - Thirugnanasambandar, Thirunavaukkarasar, Sundarar and Manickavasagar was tremendous. They are referred as Nalvar (means four in Tamil) who played a k...
2 months ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/110235125002095218190 Maria Angela Grow : The Stational Churches of Rome The Roman Missal states, for each of the days in Lent - as well as for...
The Stational Churches of Rome 

The Roman Missal states, for each of the days in Lent - as well as for a number of more solemn days throughout the year - a Stational Church in Rome. For example, on Ash Wednesday it is the Church of Santa Sabina.

This records the ancient custom of the church in Rome, whereby members of the faithful would process solemnly to that church on the stated day, and participate in the liturgy at that place.

This practice was enriched with indulgences, as the following extract from the Raccolta makes clear.

Those of us who are not in Rome can follow the stational churches in spirit, joining with the ancient Roman church - mother and mistress of all churches - as we make our Lenten pilgrimage to the sepulchre of Our Lord.

Here is a nice website with information about the Stational Churches: http://thecatholictraveler.com/lenten-station-churches-of-rome/

From the Raccolta (1866)

146. VISIT TO THE CHURCHES OF THE STATIONS.

The practice of visiting the churches of the Stations, where are preserved the sacred memorials of the saints, and especially of the martyrs, dates its institution from the first ages of Christianity; and on certain days in the year the people, clergy, and even Popes, used to go there in procession to pray. This pious and time-honoured devotion, constantly maintained, moved Pope Gregory the Great to make a list of the Stations, assigning time churches to be visited, not only during Lent, but also on certain other days and times in the year and these days he ordered to be inserted in the Roman Missal, as is related by John the Deacon in his Life of St. Gregory, book ii. cc. 2 and 6.

In order to induce the faithful to make these visits to the churches of the Stations on the appointed days, and to pray there according to the intention of the Sovereign Pontiff, the same Pope St. Gregory, and others his successors, granted various Indulgences, which were all confirmed afresh for ever by Pope Pius VI. in a decree of the S. Congr. of Indulgences, July 9, 1777; a list of these Indulgences will presently be given, as well as of the days and churches of the Stations.

Afterwards, Leo XII., motu proprio, given through the same S. Congr. of Indulgences, Feb. 28, 1827, granted -
i. An indulgence of forty years and as many quarantines, to all the faithful, every time that during Lent, with contrite hearts and devotion, they visit the churches of the Stations in the manner he prescribed; and he ordered this method of visiting the churches to be published in a book for the purpose printed at the press of the Camera Apostolica. He granted also -
ii. A plenary indulgence to all persons who shall have made the visit as above three times, each visit on a different day; to be gained on any one day when, being penitent, they shall, after Confession and Communion, visit some church or public oratory, and pray there for our holy mother the Church, etc. 
The method prescribed to be used is as follows: First, to visit some church, and say there the prayers appointed in the book, to the Blessed Sacrament, to the Blessed Virgin, and to the holy martyrs; then to go to the church of the Station, saying on the way the psalm Miserere, five Pater noster’s, five Ave Maria's, and five Gloria Patri's, and then the Steps of the Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ; and lastly, whilst at the church itself, to say the Litanies of the Saints with the versicles and prayers assigned, and at the end the psalm De profundis, etc. All unlearned persons, however, and others who do not possess this book of the Stations, may gain the same Indulgences by saying at the two churches which they visit such prayers as their own devotion suggests to them and as are suitable to their capacity; and while they go from one church to the other, they are to say a third part of their rosary with the Litanies; and on leaving the church of the Station, to end their visit with the psalm De profundis, or else with one Pater noster, one Ave Maria, and a Requiem aeternam for the holy souls in purgatory.

The same Pontiff declared his will that all nuns and others dwelling in monasteries and communities should participate in the benefit of these Indulgences, provided that they keep the method prescribed and visit their own churches; and he also extended these Indulgences to the sick and to prisoners, provided they supply what they are unable to perform by doing some good work enjoined them by their own confessor.

Note, that although it is only necessary to visit one church in order to gain the Indulgences, there are on certain days, besides the churches set down in the Roman Missal for the Stations, several other churches enjoying the same Indulgences through grants of various Sovereign Pontiffs; thus we may instance the grant of Leo XII. above named, who, by a Brief of Jan. 8, 1828, confirmed a privilege already granted by Clement VIII., Feb. 4, 1603, viz, that the church of St. Gregory on the Celian Hill should be one of the stational churches for the Friday after Ash-Wednesday whilst at time same time he desired that on the second Sunday in Lent there should be another Station at this church, as appears from a notice of his Eminence the Cardinal-Vicar, Feb. 20, 1828.

DAYS AND CHURCHES OF THE STATIONS IN ROME.

Jan. 1. Circumcision of our Lord Jesus Christ. Station, St. Mary beyond the Tiber. Indulgence of thirty years and thirty quarantines.
Jan. 6. The Epiphany of our Lord. St. Peter, on the Vatican. The same indulgence.
Septuagesima Sunday. St. Laurence, outside the Walls. The same indulgence.
Sexagesima. St. Paul, outside the Walls. The same indulgence.
Quinquagesima. St. Peter, on the Vatican. The same indulgence.
Ash-Wednesday. St. Sabina in St. Alexius, and St. Mary in Cosmedin, called Bocca della Verità. Indulgence of fifteen years and fifteen quarantines.
Thursday after Ash Wednesday. St. George in Velabro, and the church of Jesus and Mary. Indulgence of ten years and ten quarantines.
Friday. SS. John and Paul, and St. Gregory, on the Celian Hill. The same indulgence.
Saturday. St. Tryphon, and St. Augustine. The same indulgence.
First Sunday in Lent. St. John Lateran. The same indulgence.
Monday. St. Peter’s Chains and St. John della Pigna. The same indulgence.
Tuesday. St. Anastasia. The same indulgence.
Wednesday (Ember day). St. Mary Major. The same indulgence.
Thursday. St. Laurence in Pane e Perna. The same indulgence.
Friday (Ember day). The Twelve Holy Apostles. The same indulgence.
Saturday (Ember day). St. Peter, on the Vatican. The same indulgence.
Second Sunday in Lent. St. Mary in Domnica, called the Church of the Navicella, and St. Gregory, on the Celian. The same indulgence.
Monday. St. Mary Major and St. Clement. The same indulgence.
Tuesday. St. Balbina. The same indulgence. 
Wednesday. St. Cecilia beyond the Tiber. The same indulgence..
Thursday. St. Mary beyond the Tiber. The same indulgence.
Friday. St. Vitalis. The same indulgence.
Saturday. SS. Marcellinus and Peter’, near the Lateran Basilica. The same indulgence.
Third Sunday in Lent. St. Laurence, outside the Walls. Indulgence of ten years and ten quarantines.
Monday. St. Mark, The same indulgence.
Tuesday. St. Pudentiana. The same indulgence.
Wednesday. SS. Sixtus, Nereus, and Achilleus. The same indulgence.
Thursday. SS. Cosmas and Damian, in the Forum. The same indulgence.
Friday. St. Laurence in Lucina. The same indulgence.
Saturday. SS. Caius and Susanna, and St. Mary of time Angels, at the Baths. The same indulgence.
Fourth Sunday in Lent. The Holy Cross in Jerusalem. Indulgence of fifteen years and fifteen quarantines.
Monday. The Four Saints crowned with Martyrdom. Indulgence of ten years and ten quarantines.
Tuesday. St. Laurence ins St. Damasus, and St. Andrew della Valle. The same indulgence.
Wednesday. St. Paul, outside the Gates. The same indulgence.
Thursday. SS. Martin and Silvester, on the Hills, and St. Silvester in Capite. The same indulgence.
Friday. St. Eusebius and St. Bibiana. The same indulgence.
Saturday. St. Nicholas in Carcere. The same indulgence.
Passion Sunday. St. Peter, on the Vatican, and St. Lazarus. The same indulgence.
Monday. St. Crysogonus, beyond the Tiber. The same indulgence.
Tuesday. St. Cyriacus, and St. Mary on the Broad Way, and SS. Quiricus and Julitta, on the Hills. The same indulgence.
Wednesday. St. Marcellus. The same indulgence.
Thursday. St. Apollinaris. The same indulgence.
Friday. St. Stephen, on the Celian, called the Round Church of Stephen. The same indulgence.
Saturday. St. Johns before the Latin Gate, and St. Caesareus. The same indulgence.
Palm Sunday. St. John Lateran. Indulgence of twenty-five years and twenty-five quarantines.
Monday in Holy Week. St. Praxede. Indulgence of ten years and ten quarantines.
Tuesday in Holy Week. St. Prisca, and St. Mary at the Gate of the People. The same indulgence.
Wednesday in Holy Week. St. Mary Major. The same indulgence.
Thursday in Holy Week. St. John Lateran. Plenary indulgence, after Confession and Communion.
Good Friday. Holy Cross at Jerusalem. Indulgence of thirty years and thirty quarantines.
Holy Saturday. St. John Lateran. The same indulgence.
Easter Day. St. Mary Major. Plenary indulgence; after Confession and Communion.
Easter Monday. St. Peter, on the Vatican, and St. Onuphrius. Indulgence of thirty years and thirty quarantines.
Easter Tuesday. St. Paul, outside the Walls, The same indulgence.
Wednesday in Easter Week. St. Laurence, outside the the Walls. The same indulgence.
Thursday in Easter Week. The Twelve Holy Apostles. The same indulgence.
Friday in Easter Week. St. Mary of the Martyrs, called La Rotunda (The Round Church). The same indulgence.
Saturday in Easter Week. St. John Lateran. The same indulgence.
Low Sunday. St. Pancratius and St. Mary della Scala. The same indulgence.
April 25. Feast of St. Mark the Evangelist. St. Peter, on the Vatican. The same indulgence.
Rogation Monday. St. Mary Major. The same indulgence.
Rogation Tuesday. St. John Lateran. The same indulgence.
Rogation Wednesday. St. Peter, on the Vatican. The same indulgence.
Ascension Day. St. Peter, on the Vatican. Plenary indulgence; after Confession and Communion.
Saturday, Vigil of Pentecost. St. John Lateran. Indulgence of ten years and ten quarantines.
Whit-Sunday. St. Peter, on the Vatican. Indulgence of thirty years and thirty quarantines.
Whit-Monday. St. Peter's Chains. The same indulgence.
Whit-Tuesday. St. Anastasia, The same indulgence.
Wednesday in Whitsun-Week (Ember Day). St. Mary Major. The same indulgence.
Thursday in Whitsun-Week. St. Laurence, outside the Walls. The same indulgence.
Friday in Whitsun-Week (Ember Day). The Twelve Holy Apostles. The same indulgence.
Saturday in Whitsun-Week (Ember Day). Eve of the Feast of the Most Holy Trinity. St. Peter, on the Vatican. The same indulgence.
Wednesday in September (Ember day). St. Mary Major. Indulgence of ten years and ten quarantines. 
Friday in September (Ember day). The Twelve Holy Apostle’s, The same indulgence.
Saturday in September (Ember day). St. Peter, on the Vatican. The same indulgence..
First Sunday in Advent. St. Mary Major. The same indulgence.
Second Sunday in Advent. Holy Cross in Jerusalem. The same indulgence.
Third Sunday in Advent. St. Peter, on the Vatican. Indulgence of fifteen years and fifteen quarantines.
Wednesday in December (Ember day). St. Mary Major. Indulgence of ten years and ten quarantines.
Friday in December (Ember day). The Twelve Holy Apostles. The same indulgence.
Saturday in December (Ember day). St. Peter, on the Vatican The same indulgence.
Fourth Sunday in Advent. The Twelve Holy Apostles. The same indulgence.
Dec. 24. Christmas Eve. St. Mary Major. Indulgence of fifteen years and fifteen quarantines.
Dec. 25. Christmas Day. First Mass. Altar of the Holy Crib, in St. Mary Major. The same indulgence.
Second Mass. St. Anastasia. The same indulgence.
Third Mass and the rest of the day . St. Peter, on the Vatican, and St. Mary Major. Plenary indulgence, after Confession and Communion.
Dec. 26. St. Stephen the First Martyr. St. Stephen on the Celian Hill, commonly called the Round Church of St. Stephen. Indulgence of thirty years and thirty quarantines.
Dec. 27. St. John the Apostle and Evangelist. St. Mary Major. The same indulgence.
Dec. 28. The Holy Innocents. St. Paul, outside the Walls. The same indulgence.

http://liturgialatina.blogspot.com/2011/03/stational-churches-of-rome.html
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-A_yaJ6pqG_4/VryW-WokiTI/AAAAAAADdOI/yCM_HMt4XZ0/w506-h750/7_pilgrimage_churches%2B_of_Rome.jpg
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https://plus.google.com/102846019922776416432 Today's Memory : Leontyne Price's birthday born February 10, 1927 in Laurel, Mississippi Mary Violet Leontyne Price ...
Leontyne Price's birthday
born February 10, 1927 in Laurel, Mississippi

Mary Violet Leontyne Price is an American lyric soprano, the first African American singer to achieve an international reputation in opera and to sing at the Metropolitan Opera. 
Both of Price’s grandfathers had been Methodist ministers in black churches in Mississippi, and she sang in her church choir as a girl. Only when she graduated from the College of Education and Industrial Arts in Wilberforce, Ohio (1948), did she decide to seek a career as a singer. 
Her debut took place in 1952 in a Broadway revival of Four Saints in Three Acts by Virgil Thomson and Gertrude Stein. Her performance in that production, which subsequently traveled to Paris, prompted Ira Gershwin to choose her to sing the role of Bess in his revival of Porgy and Bess, which played in New York City (1952 - 1954) and then toured the United States and Europe. The year 1955 saw her triumphant performance of the title role in the National Broadcasting Company’s television production of Tosca, and she sang leading roles in other operas on television in the next few years.
Among her many honors are the Presidential Medal of Freedom (1964), the Spingarn Medal (1965), the Kennedy Center Honors (1980), the National Medal of Arts (1985), numerous honorary degrees, and nineteen Grammy Awards, for operatic or song recitals and full operas, and a special Lifetime Achievement Award in 1989, more than any other classical singer. 
More on: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leontyne_Price

George Gershwin – Porgy and Bess Summertime
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ak4Qh0Sw2_E

#todaysmemory  +Today's Memory
Watch the video: LEONTYNE PRICE - ''Summertime'' ( PORGY AND BESS/G.GERSHWIN )
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/proxy/pq-ZAg4btcuUAzh8eLJwWsuWOPS0oUu8pIJhghQfj6HnPTknJyBLMX_LTGqEDJXbLpklLoZGrLrHe8HAlpMyCPQNocc=w506-h284-n
George Gershwin - Porgy and Bess ''Summertime'' Sinfonieorchester des Bayaerischen Rundfunks dir. Carlo Franci Munich,27/1/1968
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https://plus.google.com/104453413226882514028 Halyna Myr : Born on February 3 Gertrude Stein (1874–1946), American novelist, poet, and playwright. She has been...
Born on February 3

Gertrude Stein (1874–1946), American novelist, poet, and playwright. She has been credited with inventing the term "Lost Generation" for those whose defining moment in time and coming of age had been World War I and its aftermath.

More February 3 birthdays at https://anydayguide.com/
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-VJ_ndRUeNvw/VrH5Pn7k7PI/AAAAAAAAI-4/uIW4fjCtPdU/w506-h750/stein.jpg
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https://plus.google.com/102224488439338370665 Pamphlets to Inspire : SS. Marius, Martha, Audifax and Abachum-Martyrs Feast Day: January 19 - (Latin Calendar) Marius and...
SS. Marius, Martha, Audifax and Abachum-Martyrs
Feast Day: January 19 - (Latin Calendar)


Marius and Martha his wife were Persian nobles, who with their two sons Audifax and Abachum came to Rome to worship God in the reign of Claudius II, after having been converted to the faith and distributing their fortune to the poor, as the primitive Christians did at that time in Jerusalem. In Rome, they visited Christians cast into prison for their faith: "You had compassion on prisoners," says the Epistle. According to their largely legendary passio of the sixth century, four saints of the same family who came from Persia to Rome, and were martyred in 270 for sympathizing with and burying the bodies of Christians.


A great many Christians' were ordered by the emperor to be shut up in the amphitheater, and shot to death with arrows, and their bodies burnt. Our saints gathered and buried their ashes with respect; but soon they themselves were apprehended, and after many torments under the governor Marcianus, Maris and his two sons were beheaded on the Via Cornelia, and their bodies were burnt. Martha meanwhile was killed at a place called in Nimpha or Nymphae Catabassi (later called Santa Ninfa), thirteen miles from Rome. Tradition states that Martha was cast into a well.


According to tradition, a Roman lady named Felicitas secured the half-consumed remains of the father and sons and also the mother's body from the well, and had the sacred relics secretly interred on her estate at Buxus, today Boccea. This is said to have occurred on January 20. A church arose at Boccea, and during the Middle Ages, it became a place of pilgrimage.


Their relics were found at Rome in 1590 after suffering various vicissitudes. Their relics are kept principally at Rome; part in the church of Saint Adrian, part in that of Saint Charles, and that of Saint John of Calybite. Eginhart, son-in-law and secretary of Charlemagne, deposited a portion of these relics, which had been sent to him from Rome, in the abbey of Selghenstadt, of which he was the founder, in the diocese of Mentz.


They are mentioned with distinction in all western Martyrologies from the sacramentary of Saint Gregory. Their feast day (as indicated in the Roman Martyrology) is on 19 January. In the Tridentine Roman Missal the names and the order of the names is the same, except that the name of Abacum is spelled "Abachum". In some sources, Marius is called "Maris" and Audifax is placed last. They were included in the Roman Catholic calendar of saints from the ninth century until 1969, when they were excluded because nothing is really known of these saints except their names.


These saints suffered for the faith without fearing their persecutors. They underwent many torments with prayers of thanksgiving on their lips, for in them they saw like "the sparrow liberated from the bird-catcher's net and who escapes towards heaven" (Offertory), the means of going to enjoy God for evermore (Introit).
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-nlQ7jQ4E2rA/Vp6FGMzHEPI/AAAAAAAAT_8/LEO86RHBmaE/w506-h750/SS%2BMarius%2BMartha%2BAudifax%2BAbacum.jpg
3 months ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/103463339499553941312 Pamphlets to Inspire : SS. Marius, Martha, Audifax and Abachum-Martyrs Feast Day: January 19 - (Latin Calendar) Marius and...
SS. Marius, Martha, Audifax and Abachum-Martyrs
Feast Day: January 19 - (Latin Calendar)


Marius and Martha his wife were Persian nobles, who with their two sons Audifax and Abachum came to Rome to worship God in the reign of Claudius II, after having been converted to the faith and distributing their fortune to the poor, as the primitive Christians did at that time in Jerusalem. In Rome, they visited Christians cast into prison for their faith: "You had compassion on prisoners," says the Epistle. According to their largely legendary passio of the sixth century, four saints of the same family who came from Persia to Rome, and were martyred in 270 for sympathizing with and burying the bodies of Christians.


A great many Christians' were ordered by the emperor to be shut up in the amphitheater, and shot to death with arrows, and their bodies burnt. Our saints gathered and buried their ashes with respect; but soon they themselves were apprehended, and after many torments under the governor Marcianus, Maris and his two sons were beheaded on the Via Cornelia, and their bodies were burnt. Martha meanwhile was killed at a place called in Nimpha or Nymphae Catabassi (later called Santa Ninfa), thirteen miles from Rome. Tradition states that Martha was cast into a well.


According to tradition, a Roman lady named Felicitas secured the half-consumed remains of the father and sons and also the mother's body from the well, and had the sacred relics secretly interred on her estate at Buxus, today Boccea. This is said to have occurred on January 20. A church arose at Boccea, and during the Middle Ages, it became a place of pilgrimage.


Their relics were found at Rome in 1590 after suffering various vicissitudes. Their relics are kept principally at Rome; part in the church of Saint Adrian, part in that of Saint Charles, and that of Saint John of Calybite. Eginhart, son-in-law and secretary of Charlemagne, deposited a portion of these relics, which had been sent to him from Rome, in the abbey of Selghenstadt, of which he was the founder, in the diocese of Mentz.


They are mentioned with distinction in all western Martyrologies from the sacramentary of Saint Gregory. Their feast day (as indicated in the Roman Martyrology) is on 19 January. In the Tridentine Roman Missal the names and the order of the names is the same, except that the name of Abacum is spelled "Abachum". In some sources, Marius is called "Maris" and Audifax is placed last. They were included in the Roman Catholic calendar of saints from the ninth century until 1969, when they were excluded because nothing is really known of these saints except their names.


These saints suffered for the faith without fearing their persecutors. They underwent many torments with prayers of thanksgiving on their lips, for in them they saw like "the sparrow liberated from the bird-catcher's net and who escapes towards heaven" (Offertory), the means of going to enjoy God for evermore (Introit).

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-y9eBzWEghtM/Vp5t9-HfdvI/AAAAAAAAP7E/a6R3eQPXc9c/w506-h750/saints%2Bmariu%252C%2Bmartha%2Betc..jpg
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https://plus.google.com/104422845380377117811 Zoja Petkova Markovic : Artist : Antonio da Correggio (Italian , 1490 - 1534) Title : The Holy Night (Adoration of the Shepherds...
Artist : Antonio da Correggio (Italian , 1490 - 1534) 
Title : The Holy Night (Adoration of the Shepherds)
Date : (1522 - 1530)
Medium : oil on canvas
Dimensions : Height: 2,560 mm (100.79 in). Width: 1,880 mm (74.02 in).
Current location : Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister , Dresden, Germany.

Antonio Allegri da Correggio (August 1489 - March 5, 1534), usually known as Correggio, was the foremost painter of the Parma school of the Italian Renaissance, who was responsible for some of the most vigorous and sensuous works of the 16th century. In his use of dynamic composition, illusionistic perspective and dramatic foreshortening, Correggio prefigured the Rococo art of the 18th century.

Antonio Allegri was born in Correggio, Italy, a small town near Reggio Emilia. His date of birth is uncertain (around 1489). His father was a merchant.[citation needed] Otherwise little is known about Correggio's early life or training. It is, however, often assumed that he had his first artistic education from his father's brother, the painter Lorenzo Allegri.
In 1503-5 he was apprenticed to Francesco Bianchi Ferrara in Modena, where he probably became familiar with the classicism of artists like Lorenzo Costa and Francesco Francia, evidence of which can be found in his first works. After a trip to Mantua in 1506, he returned to Correggio, where he stayed until 1510. To this period is assigned the Adoration of the Child with St. Elizabeth and John, which shows clear influences from Costa and Mantegna. In 1514 he probably finished three tondos for the entrance of the church of Sant'Andrea in Mantua, and then returned to Correggio, where, as an independent and increasingly renowned artist, he signed a contract for the Madonna altarpiece in the local monastery of St. Francis (now in the Dresden Gemäldegalerie).

By 1516, Correggio was in Parma, where he spent most of the remainder of his career. Here, he befriended Michelangelo Anselmi, a prominent Mannerist painter. In 1519, he married Girolama Francesca di Braghetis, also of Correggio, who died in 1529. One of his sons, Pomponio Allegri, became an undistinguished painter. From this period are the Madonna and Child with the Young Saint John, Christ Leaving His Mother and the lost Madonna of Albinea.
Correggio's first major commission (February - September 1519) was the ceiling decoration of the private dining salon of the mother-superior (abbess Giovanna Piacenza) of the convent of St Paul called the Camera di San Paolo at Parma. Here he painted an arbor pierced by oculi opening to glimpses of playful cherubs. Below the oculi are lunettes with images of feigned monochromic marble. The fireplace is frescoed with an image of Diana. The iconography of the scheme is complex, combining images of classical marbles with whimsical colorful bambini. While it recalls the secular frescoes of the pleasure palace of the Villa Farnesina in Rome, it is also a strikingly novel form of interior decoration.
He then painted the illusionistic Vision of St. John on Patmos (1520 - 21) for the dome of the church of San Giovanni Evangelista. Three years later he decorated the dome of the Cathedral of Parma with a startling Assumption of the Virgin, crowded with layers of receding figures in Melozzo's perspective (sotto in su, from down to up). These two works represented a highly novel illusionistic sotto in su treatment of dome decoration that would exert a profound influence upon future fresco artists, from Carlo Cignani in his fresco Assumption of the Virgin, in the cathedral church of Forlì, to Gaudenzio Ferrari in his frescoes for the cupola of Santa Maria dei Miracoli in Saronno, to Pordenone in his now-lost fresco from Treviso, and to the baroque elaborations of Lanfranco and Baciccio in Roman churches. The massing of spectators in a vortex, creating both narrative and decoration, the illusionistic obliteration of the architectural roof-plane, and the thrusting perspective towards divine infinity, were devices without precedent, and which depended on the extrapolation of the mechanics of perspective. The recession and movement implied by the figures presage the dynamism that would characterize Baroque painting.
Other masterpieces include The Lamentation and The Martyrdom of Four Saints, both at the Galleria Nazionale of Parma. The Lamentation is haunted by a lambence rarely seen in Italian painting prior to this time. The Martyrdom is also remarkable for resembling later Baroque compositions such as Bernini's Truth and Ercole Ferrata's Death of Saint Agnes, showing a gleeful saint entering martyrdom.

Aside from his religious output, Correggio conceived a now-famous set of paintings depicting the Loves of Jupiter as described in Ovid's Metamorphoses. The voluptuous series was commissioned by Federico II Gonzaga of Mantua, probably to decorate his private Ovid Room in the Palazzo Te. However, they were given to the visiting Holy Roman Emperor Charles V and thus left Italy within years of their completion.
Leda and the Swan - acquired by Frederick the Great in 1753; now in Staatliche Museen of Berlin - is a tumult of incidents: in the centre Leda straddles a swan, and on the right, a shy but satisfied maiden. Danaë, now in Rome's Borghese Gallery, depicts the maiden as she is impregnated by a curtain of gilded divine rain. Her lower torso semi-obscured by sheets, Danae appears more demure and gleeful than Titian's 1545 version of the same topic, where the rain is more accurately numismatic. The picture once called Antiope and the Satyr is now correctly identified as Venus and Cupid with a Satyr.
Ganymede Abducted by the Eagle depicts the young man aloft in literal amorous flight. Some have interpreted the conjunction of man and eagle as a metaphor for the evangelist John; however, given the erotic context of this and other paintings, this seems unlikely. This painting and its partner, the masterpiece of Jupiter and Io, are in Kunsthistorisches Museum of Vienna. Ganymede Abducted by the Eagle, one of the four mythological paintings commissioned by Federico II Gonzaga, is a proto-Baroque work due to its depiction of movement, drama, and diagonal compositional arrangement.

Correggio was remembered by his contemporaries as a shadowy, melancholic and introverted character. An enigmatic and eclectic artist, he appears to have emerged from no major apprenticeship. In addition to the influence of Costa, there are echoes of Mantegna's style in his work, and a response to Leonardo da Vinci, as well. Correggio had little immediate influence in terms of apprenticed successors, but his works are now considered to have been revolutionary and influential on subsequent artists. A half-century after his death Correggio's work was well known to Vasari, who felt that he had not had enough "Roman" exposure to make him a better painter. In the 18th and 19th centuries, his works were often noted in the diaries of foreign visitors to Italy, which led to a reevaluation of his art during the period of Romanticism. The flight of the Madonna in the vault of the cupola of the Cathedral of Parma inspired many scenographical decorations in lay and religious palaces during those centuries.
Correggio's illusionistic experiments, in which imaginary spaces replace the natural reality, seem to prefigure many elements of Mannerist and Baroque stylistic approaches. He appears to have fostered artistic grandchildren, for example, Giovannino di Pomponio Allegri (1521 - 1593). Correggio had no direct disciples outside of Parma, where he was influential on the work of Giovanni Maria Francesco Rondani, Parmigianino, Bernardo Gatti, Francesco Madonnina, and Giorgio Gandini del Grano.
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-sKLBjPt_pJs/VnuQl65X76I/AAAAAAACBD4/8dhyGZT9jdI/w506-h750/Correggio_-_The_Holy_Night_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg
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https://plus.google.com/114674716526809399459 John B Pinto 3 : I thought you might be interested in this story: Four Saints do not participate in open portion of New...
I thought you might be interested in this story: Four Saints do not participate in open portion of New Year’s Day practice, http://blogs.theadvocate.com/blackandgold/2016/01/01/four-saints-do-not-participate-in-open-portion-of-new-years-day-practice/

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Four Saints do not participate in open portion of New Year's Day practice - Black and Gold
Left tackle Terron Armstead (knee) was present, but did not participate in Friday’s practice, the final session before the Saints release their official injury report for the Atlanta game. Wide receiver Marques Colston (chest), rookie tackle Andrus Peat (concussion) and linebacker Dannell Ellerbe (hip) were not present at the portion of practice open to the …
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https://plus.google.com/104257171732397334856 Nate sportyboy : Catholics actually have four saints they can consider as patron saints of nudists, even though they ...
Catholics actually have four saints they can consider as patron saints of nudists, even though they aren't officially recognized as being patron saints of nudists as of yet: Onuphrius, Peter of Athos, Macarius of Egypt, and Paul the Hermit. They were 4th century saints who lived naked as hermits.
4 months ago - Via Community - View -
https://plus.google.com/104257171732397334856 Nate sportyboy : Catholics actually have four saints they can consider as patron saints of nudists, even though they ...
Catholics actually have four saints they can consider as patron saints of nudists, even though they aren't officially recognized as being patron saints of nudists as of yet: Onuphrius, Peter of Athos, Macarius of Egypt, and Paul the Hermit. They were 4th century saints who lived naked as hermits.
4 months ago - Via Community - View -
https://plus.google.com/104257171732397334856 Nate sportyboy : Catholics actually have four saints they can consider as patron saints of nudists, even though they ...
Catholics actually have four saints they can consider as patron saints of nudists, even though they aren't officially recognized as being patron saints of nudists as of yet: Onuphrius, Peter of Athos, Macarius of Egypt, and Paul the Hermit. They were 4th century saints who lived naked as hermits.
4 months ago - Via Community - View -
https://plus.google.com/104257171732397334856 Nate sportyboy : Catholics actually have four saints they can consider as patron saints of nudists, even though they ...
Catholics actually have four saints they can consider as patron saints of nudists, even though they aren't officially recognized as being patron saints of nudists as of yet: Onuphrius, Peter of Athos, Macarius of Egypt, and Paul the Hermit. They were 4th century saints who lived naked as hermits.
4 months ago - Via Community - View -