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Most recent 17 results returned for keyword: Faustian (Search this on MAP)

https://plus.google.com/111642063010056077093 Louis Galdieri : One of the more compelling themes of Elizabeth Kolbert’s The Sixth Extinction has to do with what she...
One of the more compelling themes of Elizabeth Kolbert’s The Sixth Extinction has to do with what she calls our “Faustian restlessness,” the irrepressible, ambitious intelligence that made it possible for human beings to venture forth and multiply in the…
The Big Drain on the Yellow Dog Plains
One of the more compelling themes of Elizabeth Kolbert’s The Sixth Extinction has to do with what she calls our “Faustian restlessness,” the irrepressible, ambitious intelligence that made it possi...
37 minutes ago - Via WordPress - View -
https://plus.google.com/108634102628067370712 Mondo Diaz : Cigar Break During the Giro Totò al Giro d’ Italia is an Italian comedy released in 1948 when cycling...
Cigar Break During the Giro

Totò al Giro d’ Italia is an Italian comedy released in 1948 when cycling was very popular. A Faustian bargain is made with a professor who will marry a beauty contest winner, only if he wins the Giro. At one point in the film, the racers wonder how they professor is doing so well, what was his secret, and having seen him smoking a cigar, at the start of the next stage they all began to smoke.

In the scene legends Coppi and Bartali puff on huge Tuscan cigars.

See the famous clip on YouTube.

http://goo.gl/yzXvgC
2 hours ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/100758809784438377360 TK Wells : The Carpenter, by Max Myllan (The Blue Collar Assassin Series) When Eric James Donovan, a carpenter ...
The Carpenter, by Max Myllan
  (The Blue Collar Assassin Series) When Eric James Donovan, a carpenter by trade and former black ops squad leader, distraught from the ravages of the Great Recession, is offered a Faustian bargain, he discovers “anyone will do anything if they are tempted...
The Carpenter, by Max Myllan | Author and Book Buzzhttp://
(The Blue Collar Assassin Series) When Eric James Donovan, a carpenter by trade and former black ops squad leader, distraught from the ravages of the Great Recession, is offered a Faustian bargain, he discovers “anyone will do anything if they are tempted enough or desperate enough.
19 hours ago - Via Blogger - View -
https://plus.google.com/111567745964099197505 Jen Naumann : Book Review: Mortal Danger by Ann Aguirre Edie Kramer has a score to settle with the beautiful people...
Book Review: Mortal Danger by Ann Aguirre
Edie Kramer has a score to settle with the beautiful people at Blackbriar Academy. Their cruelty drove her to the brink of despair, and four months ago, she couldn't imagine being strong enough to face her senior year. But thanks to a Faustian compact with ...
Book Review: Mortal Danger by Ann Aguirre
Edie Kramer has a score to settle with the beautiful people at Blackbriar Academy. Their cruelty drove her to the brink of despair, and four months ago, she couldn't imagine being strong enough to face her senior year. But th...
1 day ago - Via Blogger - View -
https://plus.google.com/117177061085784456426 Lisa Vaas : I guess it's not Faustian, really. More like pointing out the current state of the loss of privacy rights...
I guess it's not Faustian, really. More like pointing out the current state of the loss of privacy rights via a Goodwill donation. Or something. It's Art!
Dutch student sells online soul at auction for €350
Shawn Buckles has sold bucket-loads of his online data in a Faustian bargain with the highest bidder, intended to prove a point about loss of privacy in the age of big data. But what about the priv...
2 days ago - Via Shared from the web - View -
https://plus.google.com/108187113172836127275 imad soltani : Dutch student sells online soul at auction for €350 - Shawn Buckles has sold bucket-loads of his online...
Dutch student sells online soul at auction for €350 - Shawn Buckles has sold bucket-loads of his online data in a Faustian bargain with the highest bidder, intended to prove a point about loss of privacy in the age of big data. But what about the privacy rights of everyone he's emailed in the past? http://ow.ly/2FU2uq
Dutch student sells online soul at auction for €350
Shawn Buckles has sold bucket-loads of his online data in a Faustian bargain with the highest bidder, intended to prove a point about loss of privacy in the age of big data. But what about the priv...
2 days ago - Via HootSuite - View -
https://plus.google.com/110229016691679888824 Austin Grinnell : Hell and Back This is something that I wrote in school, trying to balance myself out between what I ...
Hell and Back
This is something that I wrote in school, trying to balance myself out between what I liked to write and what was appropriate. It was also written during a period in which I was seeking out Faustian tales to watch and read. waking up to a new world removed ...
Hell and Back
This is something that I wrote in school, trying to balance myself out between what I liked to write and what was appropriate. It was also written during a period in which I was seeking out Faustian tales to watch and read. ...
2 days ago - Via Blogger - View -
https://plus.google.com/103133600945681446804 Edmund de Wight : Last day for the FREE Kindle version of The Grinning One. A novella of magic and Faustian deals. 
Last day for the FREE Kindle version of The Grinning One. A novella of magic and Faustian deals. 
Amazon.com: The Grinning One eBook: Edmund de Wight: Kindle Store
Amazon.com: The Grinning One eBook: Edmund de Wight: Kindle Store
3 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/118246467785811775338 Matthew Rees : Faustian Pack: Through His Teeth at the Linbury Studio Theatre The main theatre at the Royal Opera House...
Faustian Pack: Through His Teeth at the Linbury Studio Theatre
The main theatre at the Royal Opera House was showing Faust and it was running other events under the label Faustian Pack to compliment this. Through His Teeth was a new opera inspired by the story of Faust which was performed at the modern Linbury Studio T...
Ham Life: Faustian Pack: Through His Teeth at the Linbury Studio Theatre
The main theatre at the Royal Opera House was showing Faust and it was running other events under the label Faustian Pack to compliment this. Through His Teeth was a new opera inspired by the story of Faust which was performed at the modern Linbury Studio Theatre on the lower level.
3 days ago - Via Blogger - View -
https://plus.google.com/103821054716204698968 Adam Browning : Economics is based on the twin concepts of scarcity and efficiency. If every single person living in...
Economics is based on the twin concepts of scarcity and efficiency. If every single person living in India wanted a new mobile phone this year, we would have to produce 1.2 billion phones. Making that many phones means we can then make only fewer washing machines, television sets and cell phone towers.

This is because the raw materials required (such as steel, aluminium, plastic) and the number of factories and workers required are in limited supply. On the bright side, if things weren’t scarce, we wouldn’t have been functioning very smartly.

Scarcity imposes a maximum limit on the total number of goods and services that can be produced. In an economy where we can produce 1 billion phones and 30 million washing machines, if we want to meet the new demand of 1.2 billion phones, we have to bring washing machine production to 25 million. The number of washing machines not produced is called the ‘opportunity cost.’

Let’s say you have a choice of splitting your time on a night before a test between studying and playing a video game. If for every extra hour you spend on the console you lose five marks on the test, the five marks represents the opportunity cost of more play time.

The concept of ‘opportunity cost’ helps decide if an economy is functioning efficiently.
If producing more mobile phones uses scarce minerals that could instead be used to produce life-saving medical equipment

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-in-school/scarcity-makes-us-smarter/article5161379.ece


It’s time to put the idea of ‘planned obsolescence’ on the scrap heap
The city of Livermore, California is home to the longest burning light bulb in the world. It has burnt continuously since 1901 (if you don’t believe me you can watch it live at www.centennialbulb.org Ironically it has already outlived two webcams).
While often used as the symbol for innovation and invention, the light bulb was in fact one of the first victims of “planned obsolescence”
In fact, this approach has been central to almost all manufacturing processes since the 1950s. And here we are in 2014 with flat pack furniture designed only to be assembled once, operating systems staying relevant for a couple of years if we’re lucky, and smartphones that are out of date by the time they’re brought home from the store.
In other words, planned obsolescence has never been so commonplace. “You’re always designing three years in advance, and you’re designing with desire – rather than need – in mind,” explains Prof Alex Milton, head of the Faculty of Design at the National College of Art and Design in Dublin (NCAD). “It’s a growth model, the economy is based on growth.”
“Both the fashion and technology sectors are shaped by this. In fashion, consumer demand around latest styles and trends dictates that there needs to be a continuous flow of new concepts, each rendering the previous obsolete. The technology sector is the same.”
These two industries are often cited as the worst offenders. “The IT industry as a whole, along with fashion? They’re as bad as it gets,” says Milton. “We all recently saw the horrors in Bangladesh caused by the fast fashion industry. Well if you go to Guangzhou, China where Apple products are manufactured, it’s pretty much the same situation: contemporary sweatshops.”
Because of the very nature of innovative technology, it is almost forgiven how quickly products and services are deemed out of date.
“It’s all about the new,” says Milton. “But the vehicles that carry new technological possibilities should have some durability. They don’t need to be disposable. We can update software very easily. So it’s more a hardware issue.
“However, manufacturers are wilfully not enabling us to do that because their business model is predicated on buying the new.
“I believe, however, the smarter technology companies – that will have a legacy and longevity – will start to sell systems where products can be repaired and parts replaced rather than the whole device ending up in landfill after 18 months.”
It’s not that long ago that you would buy a PC and fit the hard drive yourself. Only in fairly recent times have computers become lifestyle products where there isn’t a screw in sight and “snap fits” designed not to be reopened are the norm.
“Start-ups are looking at existing products and starting to think about challenging this stuff. Because the model is broken. And it is going to require a reinvention.”
http://www.irishtimes.com/business/it-s-time-to-put-the-idea-of-planned-obsolescence-on-the-scrap-heap-1.1691840?page=1


Under a strategy of planned obsolescence, consumers are being asked to discard their technology devices long before their useful life has ended. If you’re still hanging on to the original iPad, you probably feel like you’re holding on to an artifact from the dark ages of the tablet era. Which, by the way, was all of two-and-a-half years ago.

However, Apple’s not alone in embracing planned obsolescence as a business strategy (as Jimmy Kimmel demonstrates in this hilarious comedy sketch) — nearly any technology company with an ecosystem of products can now play this game. One product upgrade forces your hand to upgrade another product or service.

Unlike the planned obsolescence of 60 years ago, when designers and manufacturers started thinking of new ways to get consumers to upgrade their products sooner than they planned, this obsolescence is all about leveraging an entire ecosystem to get you to upgrade multiple ways at one time. In other words, it’s not just about updating your iPad this time around, it’s also about updating your iOS, which leads you to think about updating all the other digital devices that run on that iOS. And, since all the Apple products are synced together as part of a vast ecosystem, updating your iOS means updating your OSX. And that might just lead to updating your MacBook Pro or iMac. And, if your hardware isn’t supported by the lastest upgrade, well, you know what that means.


This is great for a company’s stock price, but since we’re speaking about product ecosystems here, what about the ultimate impact on nature’s ecosystems? What’s happening to all the digital devices that we’re discarding at breakneck speed? Some are being recycled, certainly, but it’s fair to assume that a lot of stuff is ending up in landfills somewhere. And, as the original critics of planned obsolescence pointed out nearly half a century ago, this changing pattern of consumption might actually be leading tech companies to adopt the types of manufacturing practices, such as low-wage factory work overseas, that are essential to maintaining the shrinking lifetimes of tech products.
While some may argue for the economic benefits of planned obsolescence (like higher GDP and greater innovation), it’s fair to say that others are wondering if our society has struck a type of Faustian bargain, exchanging short-term gain for long-term pain.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/innovations/post/welcome-to-the-new-planned-obsolescence/2012/11/09/6d6188f4-2901-11e2-aaa5-ac786110c486_blog.html



Some say that in addition to handling e-waste with more care, it would also be helpful to change South Korea’s culture of frequently replacing electronics, so as to limit the amount of waste that is created in the first place.

http://blogs.wsj.com/korearealtime/2013/07/25/seoul-employs-elderly-to-tackle-phone-waste/
                                        

                                          US uses India as electronics garbage dump





Electronic Waste - Where does it go? PAKISTAN (Recycle)







China - World's dumping ground for Electronic Waste (CNN)



 Did you ever wonder what happens to your old laptop or cellphone when you throw it away?
Chances are some of your old electronic junk will end up in China.
According to a recent United Nations report, "China now appears to be the largest e-waste dumping site in the world."
E-waste, or electronic waste, consists of everything from scrapped TVs, refrigerators and air conditioners to that old desktop computer that may be collecting dust in your closet.
Many of these gadgets were initially manufactured in China. Through a strange twist of global economics, much of this electronic junk returns to China to die.
"According to United Nations data, about 70% of electronic waste globally generated ended up in China," said Ma Tianjie, a spokesman for the Beijing office of Greenpeace.
For the past decade, the southeastern town of Guiyu, nestled in China's main manufacturing zone, has been a major hub for the disposal of e-waste. Hundreds of thousands of people here have become experts at dismantling the world's electronic junk.
On seemingly every street, laborers sit on the pavement outside workshops ripping out the guts of household appliances with hammers and drills. The roads in Guiyu are lined with bundles of plastic, wires, cables and other garbage. Different components are separated based on their value and potential for re-sale. On one street sits a pile of green and gold circuit boards. On another, the metal cases of desktop computers.
At times, it looks like workers are reaping some giant plastic harvest, especially when women stand on roadsides raking ankle-deep "fields" of plastic chips.
In one workshop, men sliced open sacks of these plastic chips, which they then poured into large vats of fluid. They then used shovels and their bare hands to stir this synthetic stew.
"We sell this plastic to Foxconn," one of the workers said, referring to a Taiwanese company that manufactures products for many global electronics companies, including Apple, Dell and Hewlett-Packard.
Much of the toxic pollution comes from burning circuit boards, plastic and copper wires, or washing them with hydrochloric acid to recover valuable metals like copper and steel. In doing so, workshops contaminate workers and the environment with toxic heavy metals like lead, beryllium and cadmium, while also releasing hydrocarbon ashes into the air, water and soil, the report said.
For first-time visitors to Guiyu, the air leaves a burning sensation in the eyes and nostrils.
Studies by the Shantou University Medical College revealed that many children tested in Guiyu had higher than average levels of lead in their blood, which can stunt the development of the brain and central nervous system.
Piles of technological scrap had been dumped in a muddy field just outside of town. There, water buffalo grazed and soaked themselves in ponds surrounded by piles of electronic components with labels like Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Epson and Dell.
The enormous animals casually stomped through mounds of sheet glass, which clearly had been removed from video monitors.
Flat screen displays often use mercury, a highly toxic metal.
"Releases of mercury can occur during the dismantling of equipment such as flat screen displays," wrote Greenpeace, in a report titled "Toxic Tech." "Incineration or landfilling can also result in releases of mercury to the environment...that can bioaccumulate and biomagnify to high levels in food chains, particularly in fish."
But residents who did not work in the e-waste business offered a very different take on the pollution in Guiyu.
A group of farmers who had migrated from neighboring Guangxi province to cultivate rice in Guiyu told CNN they did not dare drink the local well water.
They claimed if they tried to wash clothes and linens with the water, it turned fabrics yellow.
The head of the group, who identified himself as Zhou, had another shocking admission.
"It may not sound nice, but we don't dare eat the rice that we farm because it's planted here with all the pollution," Zhou said, pointing at water-logged rice paddy next to him.
Not that surprising considering that the latest food scandal to hit the country earlier this month is cadmium-laced rice. Officials in Guangzhou city, roughly 400 kilometers away from Guiyu, found high rates of cadmium in rice and rice products. According to the city's Food and Drug Administration samples pulled from a local restaurant, food seller and two university canteens showed high levels of cadmium in rice and rice noodles. Officials did not specify how the contaminated rice entered the city's food supply.
To avoid a vicious cycle of pollution, resulting from both the manufacture and disposal of appliances, Greenpeace has lobbied for manufacturers to use fewer toxic chemicals in their products.
The organization also has a message for consumers who seem to swap their phones, tablets and other computer devices with increasing frequency.
"Think about where your mobile phone or where your gadgets go," said Ma, the Greenpeace activist.
"When you think about changing [your phone], or buying a new product, always think about the footprint that you put on this planet."
http://www.cnn.com/2013/05/30/world/asia/china-electronic-waste-e-waste/


The soil in Guiyu has been found to be so saturated with heavy metals such as lead, chromium and tin that groundwater has become undrinkable.
According to China's Shantou University, the town has the highest level of cancer-causing dioxins in the world, and local children suffer from an extremely high rate of lead poisoning.
And now, says Mr Minter, it is not only old computers that are being thrown away there. The disposal of new and unused electronics is aggravating the problem even further.
The writer took photos of the boxes he had found. Many of the packages had "out of warranty" labels on them.
Mr Minter contacted the companies mentioned on the labels, although he concedes that the unused electronic components may not have come from the manufacturers directly, but through an e-waste trader.
Although very recently the west was the main source of e-waste in Asia - it is estimated that people in the United States, for instance, throw away more than 350,000 mobile phones and 130,000 computers every single day - Mr Minter says that tables were now turning.
"Half of the e-waste currently being processed in China is generated in China," he says.
http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-17782718


14 December 2013
Toxic 'e-waste' dumped in poor nations, says United Nations

Millions of mobile phones, laptops, tablets, toys, digital cameras and other electronic devices bought this Christmas are destined to create a flood of dangerous "e-waste" that is being dumped illegally in developing countries, the UN has warned.
The global volume of electronic waste is expected to grow by 33% in the next four years, when it will weigh the equivalent of eight of the great Egyptian pyramids, according to the UN's Step initiative, which was set up to tackle the world's growing e-waste crisis. Last year nearly 50m tonnes of e-waste was generated worldwide – or about 7kg for every person on the planet. These are electronic goods made up of hundreds of different materials and containing toxic substances such as lead, mercury, cadmium, arsenic and flame retardants. An old-style CRT computer screen can contain up to 3kg of lead, for example.
Once in landfill, these toxic materials seep out into the environment, contaminating land, water and the air. In addition, devices are often dismantled in primitive conditions. Those who work at these sites suffer frequent bouts of illness.
An indication of the level of e-waste being shipped to the developing world was revealed by Interpol last week. It said almost one in three containers leaving the EU that were checked by its agents contained illegal e-waste. Criminal investigations were launched against 40 companies. "Christmas will see a surge in sales and waste around the world," says Ruediger Kuehr, executive secretary of Step. "The explosion is happening because there's so much technical innovation. TVs, mobile phones and computers are all being replaced more and more quickly. The lifetime of products is also shortening."
According to the Step report, e-waste – which extends from old fridges to toys and even motorised toothbrushes – is now the world's fastest growing waste stream. China generated 11.1m tonnes last year, followed by the US with 10m tonnes, though there was significant difference per capita. For example, on average each American generated 29.5kg, compared to less than 5kg per person in China.
By 2017, Kuehr expects the volume of end-of-life TVs, phones, computers, monitors, e-toys and other products to be enough to fill a 15,000-mile line of 40-tonne lorries. In Europe, Germany discards the most e-waste in total, but Norway and Liechtenstein throw away more per person. Britain is now the world's seventh most prolific producer, discarding 1.37m tonnes, or about 21kg per person. No figures are available from government or industry on how much is exported.
Although it is legal to export discarded goods to poor countries if they can be reused or refurbished, much is being sent to Africa or Asia under false pretences, says Interpol. "Much is falsely classified as 'used goods' although in reality it is non-functional. It is often diverted to the black market and disguised as used goods to avoid the costs associated with legitimate recycling," said a spokesman. "A substantial proportion of e-waste exports go to countries outside Europe, including west African countries. Treatment in these countries usually occurs in the informal sector, causing significant environmental pollution and health risks for local populations," he said.
Few countries understand the scale of the problem, because no track is kept of all e-waste, says the European Environment Agency, which estimates between 250,000 tonnes and 1.3m tonnes of used electrical products are shipped out of the EU every year, mostly to west Africa and Asia. "These goods may subsequently be processed in dangerous and inefficient conditions, harming the health of local people and damaging the environment," said a spokesman.
A new study by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology suggests that the US discarded 258.2m computers, monitors, TVs and mobile phones in 2010, of which only 66% was recycled. Nearly 120m mobile phones were collected, most of which were shipped to Hong Kong, Latin America and the Caribbean. The shelf life of a mobile phone is now less than two years, but the EU, US and Japanese governments say many hundreds of millions are thrown away each year or are left in drawers. In the US, only 12m mobile phones were collected for recycling in 2011 even though 120m were bought. Meanwhile, newer phone models are racing on to the market leaving old ones likely to end up in landfills. Most phones contain precious metals. The circuit board can contain copper, gold, zinc, beryllium, and tantalum, the coatings are typically made of lead and phone makers are now increasingly using lithium batteries. Yet fewer than 10% of mobile phones are dismantled and reused. Part of the problem is that computers, phones and other devices are becoming increasingly complex and made of smaller and smaller components.
The failure to recycle is also leading to shortages of rare-earth minerals to make future generations of electronic equipment.
http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2013/dec/14/toxic-ewaste-illegal-dumping-developing-countries


AMERICANS replace their cellphones every 22 months, junking some 150 million old phones in 2010 alone. Ever wondered what happens to all these old phones? The answer isn’t pretty.
In far-flung, mostly impoverished places like Agbogbloshie, Ghana; Delhi, India; and Guiyu, China, children pile e-waste into giant mountains and burn it so they can extract the metals — copper wires, gold and silver threads — inside, which they sell to recycling merchants for only a few dollars. In India, young boys smash computer batteries with mallets to recover cadmium, toxic flecks of which cover their hands and feet as they work. Women spend their days bent over baths of hot lead, “cooking” circuit boards so they can remove slivers of gold inside. Greenpeace, the Basel Action Network and others have posted YouTube videos of young children inhaling the smoke that rises from burned phone casings as they identify and separate different kinds of plastics for recyclers. It is hard to imagine that good health is a by-product of their unregulated industry.
Indeed, most scientists agree that exposure poses serious health risks, especially to pregnant women and children. The World Health Organization reports that even a low level of exposure to lead, cadmium and mercury (all of which can be found in old phones) can cause irreversible neurological damage and threaten the development of a child.
The growing toxic nightmare that is e-waste is not confined to third world outposts. It also poses health problems in the United States where, for several years, the Federal Bureau of Prisons has kept inmates busy processing e-waste.
The European Union provides a model for industrial regulation that would shift the burden of safe product disposal back to the manufacturers that produce electronic goods. Its Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive requires electronic sellers to accept, free of charge, any of their used products brought in by customers for recycling. The goal is to have properly recycled 85 percent of the European Union’s e-waste by 2019. Similarly, Japan requires its electronic manufacturers to establish their own recycling facilities or commission third parties to recycle a range of products, from computers and cellphones to TVs and air-conditioners.
In the absence of government regulation or industry initiative, consumers could play a role in determining what happens to products that have outlived their usefulness. Most phones and small electronics are designed with obsolescence in mind. But what if we held on to our gadgets longer and repaired, rather than replaced them? We could recycle the ones we no longer use through certified recycling services like e-Stewards, a nonprofit organization that runs certification programs for e-waste recyclers, ensuring that goods are not improperly exported.
As consumers we need to demand better end-of-life options for our high-tech trash; if manufacturers and government fall down on the job, we, the millions of Americans who own cellphones, should press for safe recycling.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/05/opinion/sunday/where-do-old-cellphones-go-to-die.html


E-WASTE AND WHERE IT COMES FROM
■ A computer circuit board can contain gold, copper, cadmium, iron, tantalum, molybdenum, palladium, lead, cobalt, tin, nickel, cerium, antimony, platinum, zinc, lanthanum, silver and mercury.
■ A chip in a smartphone can contain 60 chemical elements.
■ China made 1.18bn mobile phones in 2012.
■ The US discarded 258.2m computers, monitors, TVs and mobile phones in 2010. Each American is responsible for an average 29.8kg of hi-tech waste; it's 5.4kg in China and 21.82kg in the UK.
■ The total annual volume of e-waste is expected to grow by 33% to 65.4m tonnes by 2017.
■ The lowest levels of e-waste per person are generated in DR Congo (0.21kg) and Burkina Faso (0.81kg)
■ 10bn mobile-connected devices expected to be in use by 2017.
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/dec/14/ghana-dump-electronic-waste-not-good-place-live


When was the first time you heard about planned obsolescence?
It was in 1999 during a trip I made to the United States. There I had the chance to see a light bulb at the Livermore Fire Station in California, which has remained lit non-stop for 111 years. Seeing this light bulb gave me a feeling of indignation, that we are constantly and intentionally being messed around in order to subject us to an economic system based on consumption for its own sake.
Bernard London came up with that concept at the time when the earth’s sustainability was not a concern, because there was no research into the planet’s resources and their exhaustion. This is really important now, because we know that the world’s resources are not infinite, therefore we cannot continue to make things as if they were.
We are in a bad economic situation due to, among many other factors, insatiable consumption. If products didn’t have planned obsolescence would we be in a better situation?
Without a doubt, while the current socio-economic model is based on consumption, on planned obsolescence, on credit and on wars in countries where traditional energy sources such as oil and gas exist, with the objective of gaining control of these energy sources and to be able to continue endlessly making things with short lifespans in order to generate consumption and credit. Something that has basically led us to the point where the world’s wealth is concentrated in fewer hands, and where banks and market speculators can even bring down whole countries through speculation with its sovereign debt.
http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-fight-against-consumerism-and-planned-obsolescence-the-everlasting-light-bulb/5336950


Modular phone by Phonebloks: The current model of consumer electronics is that of planned obsolescence. Usually only one or two components in a phone will break, while the rest of the unit is still functioning, so consumers have no choice but to get a new phone. Phonebloks has designed a unit comprised of detachable blocks (battery, antenna, gyroscope, etc) which can be replaced when necessary, so the whole phone needn't be discarded. It works on an open-source platform and was originally conceived to tackle problems of e-waste. Although not on the market yet, a prototype is currently being developed.
http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/gallery/2014/apr/03/modularity-gone-wild-making-everyday-products-sustainable

More People Have Mobile Phones Than Electricity Or Drinking Water
http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-putting-global-mobile-in-context-2012-4


Cellphones that Repair Themselves? Scientists Create ‘Self-Healing’ Circuits

Cellphone, heal thyself — if you’re sick of having to work your way through a series of broken electronic devices, dulled (or dead) batteries and an endless thread of replacement cellphones, help may be at hand thanks to scientists at the University of Illinois, who are hard at work creating “self-healing electronic circuits.”

The research team has developed a system of capsules inserted along the circuit, each one filled with liquid metal that — when the circuit is broken — are released to restore connectivity and complete the circuit again. It simplifies the system, explains U of I chemistry professor, Jeffrey Moore: “Rather than having to build in redundancies or to build in a sensory diagnostics system, this material is designed to take care of the problem itself.”

The implications of a self-repairing circuit could be huge, says material science and engineering professor Nancy Sottos, who led the U of I team alongside Moore: “In general there’s not much avenue for manual repair [in electronic devices with broken circuits]. Sometimes you just can’t get to the inside. In a multilayer integrated circuit, there’s no opening it up. Normally you just replace the whole chip. It’s true for a battery too. You can’t pull a battery apart and try to find the source of the failure.”
In tests, the new system can repair circuits in a fraction of a second, with the majority returning to 99% capacity. The system is autonomous, meaning that it can be used to repair circuits even when mechanics don’t know where the broken circuit actually is, or are unable to get to it easily.
The next step for the research team is further testing to refine the system, but it’s possible that this new invention could lead to a massive reduction in the amount of electronic waste generated as a result of electronic faults. All we need now? For someone to design devices that never go out of style, so we never need a new cellphone again.
http://techland.time.com/2011/12/28/cellphones-that-repair-themselves-scientists-create-self-healing-circuits/
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Three Fates

Facing a Faustian deal
Don't chose the quick payoff
A moment that takes a future
Comes at far too high a cost

Facing a Hobson's choice
You take what you are given
From the frying pan to the fire
While hoping to keep on living

Facing a Warmock dilemma
Because of one's own making
Given what you say today
And how it may be taken

- Matthew
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Nobody can to contest the absolute priority of "M Thermodynamic resonant engine" (Absolute rotary engine) and of " Shock wave converter" , because there are new "elements" what never been used. Then is time to help me to make it and to keep those things together  against our faustian spirit.
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Hi Guys!

Yet another question.

Let's say we have a character with the Aspect I pacted with Baron Samedi and now I'm Inmortal (or similar, I'm not good with phrasing, it would seem). Said faustian pact would have a "render a service for me once every year" kind of clause, the loa would demand anything from the character and he/she should obligue.

I understand that Al Aspects Are True would involve that said character cannot be killed (though can be taken out by means of KO), but what would be good invokes/compels on said aspect? 'Cause the yearly service would be - I understand - part of the Aspect, not a compel by itself... or wouldn't it?
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Vote now! Vote often #eveonline #tweetfleet #csm9  
Watch the video: Promoting the Eve Online CSM Elections
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/proxy/cL30uVRUh_9KtrA-FFjJqyZrCxJFpKoMZWxaW5YrzHozzIM91abI5inD-sSs9Kz5opaJ-iy-W6Qk3dfG09799lijvdo=w506-h284-n
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The idea of the Faustian Bargain interested me a great deal when we were reading Dr. Faustus because during class most people said that they would not sell themselves for any price, but in reality I believe that this is false. I believe that the desire for ...
March Monthly Blog
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Nigeria youths are not fighting true liberation but faustian service for their pocket.
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