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https://plus.google.com/106346427339448935579 Olumide Fafore : TRIBUTE: Gabriel García Márquez: 'The greatest Colombian who ever lived' Godfather of Magical Realism...
TRIBUTE: Gabriel García Márquez: 'The greatest Colombian who ever lived' Godfather of Magical Realism
Gabriel García Márquez  Not many pillars of literature who held the century past upon their shoulders lived this far into the 21st. Seamus Heaney ,
Carlos Fuentes and Gabriel García Márquez were among the very few in
their league to remain among us until ...
TRIBUTE: Gabriel García Márquez: 'The greatest Colombian who ever lived' Godfather of Magical Realism
Gabriel García Márquez  Not many pillars of literature who held the century past upon their shoulders lived this far into the 21st. Seamus Heaney, Carlos Fuentes and Gabriel García Márquez were among the very few in their ...
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https://plus.google.com/111882385839339227856 artem postnikov : AURA CARLOS FUENTES PDF DESCARGAR by Trotter Name: Aura Carlos Fuentes Pdf File size: 27 MB Date added...
AURA CARLOS FUENTES PDF DESCARGAR by Trotter
Name: Aura Carlos Fuentes Pdf File size: 27 MB Date added: February 10, 2013 Price: Free Operating system: Windows XP/Vista/7/8 Total downloads: 1333 Downloads last week: 45 Product ranking: ★★★☆☆ Since my mother was sick, I couldn't go there. How long have...
AURA CARLOS FUENTES PDF DESCARGAR by Trotter
Name:Aura Carlos Fuentes PdfFile size:27 MBDate added:February 10, 2013Price:FreeOperating system:Windows XP/Vista/7/8Total downloads:1333Downloads last week:45Product ranking:★★★☆☆ Since my mother was sick, I couldn't go the...
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https://plus.google.com/102919297041813942298 Ron Shtigliz : we lost an amazing author on all levels of the literary work. Latin American author Gabriel Garcia ...
we lost an amazing author on all levels of the literary work.

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America's best-known writer.

His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.

A Writer Shaped By His Beginnings

Garcia Marquez was born in 1927 in the Colombian coast town of Aracataca, which experienced a boom after a U.S. fruit company arrived. In a 1984 interview with NPR, he said his writing was forever shaped by the grandparents who raised him as a young child:

"There was a real dichotomy in me because, on one hand ... there was the world of my grandfather; a world of stark reality, of civil wars he told me about, since he had been a colonel in the last civil war. And then, on the other hand, there was the world of my grandmother, which was full of fantasy, completely outside of reality."

One Hundred Years of Solitude
One Hundred Years of Solitude
by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Paperback, 16 pages purchase
fiction
More on this book:
NPR reviews, interviews and more
Read an excerpt
Garcia Marquez's grandfather, grandmother, their stories and their town became the raw material for his most famous work.

"One Hundred Years of Solitude is a towering book of enormous influence worldwide. And it is also as close as one could get to a perfect book," says Ilan Stavans, who wrote a biography of the author's early years, including the time Garcia Marquez spent as a newspaper journalist.

"He was a nobody," Stavans says. "He was really an unknown journalist and author of short stories, just beginning to make his career. He was, at that point, coming close to 40, and the fame and celebrity and this standing that he has as a literary giant of the 20th century really all coalesced in that particular moment when the book was published."

It was a unique moment in time, and One Hundred Years of Solitude struck a chord, says Gerald Martin, another Garcia Marquez biographer.

"You had to be in the 1960s. You had to be in the world of the Beatles and Third World revolution, psychedelia, lots of things, to understand now what impact the first page of that book had," Martin says. "It seemed to be a kind of writing that everybody had been waiting for. They didn't know they were waiting for it till it came. It was just one of those zeitgeist things."

Here's a taste of the book's first lines:

"Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendia was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice. At that time, Macondo was a village of twenty adobe houses, built on the bank of a river of clear water that ran along a bed of polished stones, which were white and enormous, like prehistoric eggs. The world was so recent that many things lacked names, and in order to indicate them it was necessary to point."
Martin says, "The first two lines, the first time you read them, you just felt, 'I've read this before. Where does this come from?' which is what [Garcia Marquez] felt when he first ... thought up the first line of the book."

Writing 'The Reality Of Latin America'

Garcia Marquez was part of a Latin American literature boom in the 1960s and '70s, along with Mexican writer Carlos Fuentes and Peruvian author Mario Vargas Llosa, with whom Garcia Marquez differed sharply in his political beliefs. The Colombian got his leftist leanings from his grandfather, and they shaped his writing.

"I write mostly about the reality I know, about the reality of Latin America," Garcia Marquez said. "Any interpretation of this reality in literature must be political. I cannot escape my own ideology when I interpret reality in my books; it's inseparable."

Colombian author Gabriel Garcia Marquez was awarded the 1982 Nobel Prize in literature "for his novels and short stories, in which the fantastic and the realistic are combined in a richly composed world of imagination, reflecting a continent's life and conflicts".i
Colombian author Gabriel Garcia Marquez was awarded the 1982 Nobel Prize in literature "for his novels and short stories, in which the fantastic and the realistic are combined in a richly composed world of imagination, reflecting a continent's life and conflicts".

Hulton Archive/Getty Images
His 10 novels include The Autumn of the Patriarch, about a Latin American dictator, but they also include a love story about two elderly people married to other people, Love in the Time of Cholera, which was made into a film in 2007.

'He Gives A Voice To Latin America'

Garcia Marquez titled his 1982 Nobel Prize acceptance speech "The Solitude of Latin America."

In it, he spoke about Latin America's wars, military coups, dictatorships and ethnocide:

"We, the inventors of tales, who will believe anything, feel entitled to believe that it is not yet too late to engage in the creation of ... a new and sweeping utopia of life, where no one will be able to decide for others how they die, where love will prove true and happiness be possible, and where the races condemned to one hundred years of solitude will have, at last and forever, a second opportunity on earth."
Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says the speech was one of the author's most important messages to the world.

"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."
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https://plus.google.com/106443631293705273808 Able Lawrence : Gabriel García Márquez (6 March 1927, Aracataca, Colombia – 17 April 2014, Mexico City, Mexico), known...
Gabriel García Márquez (6 March 1927, Aracataca, Colombia – 17 April 2014, Mexico City, Mexico), known affectionately as Gabo, was a novelist, short-story and visionary writer, journalist, and a left-leaning intellectual and political figure. Considered one of the most significant authors of the 20th century, he was awarded the 1972 Neustadt International Prize for Literature and the 1982 Nobel Prize in Literature.
 
“[F]or his novels and short stories, in which the fantastic and the realistic are combined in a richly composed world of imagination, reflecting a continent's life and conflicts.
[…]
In his novels and short stories we are led into this peculiar place where the miraculous and the real converge. The extravagant flight of his own fantasy combines with traditional folk tales and facts, literary allusions and tangible — at times obtrusively graphic — descriptions approaching the matter-of-factness of reportage.” — the Swedish Academy, Award Ceremony Speech 1982.
 
Gabo is best known for One Hundred Years of Solitude (Spanish: Cien años de soledad; 1967), a dreamlike, dynastic epic that has been translated into a large number of languages. It tells the story of seven generations of the Buendia family in the fictional village of Macondo, mainly inspired by his birthplace Aracataca where Gabo was raised by his maternal grandparents. The novel was dubbed “Latin America’s Don Quixote” by Pablo Neruda and Carlos Fuentes. Other classics from Gabo includes No One Writes to the Colonel (Spanish: El coronel no tiene quien le escriba; 1961), In Evil Hour (Spanish: La mala hora; 1962), The Autumn of the Patriarch (Spanish: El otoño del patriarca; 1975), Chronicle of a Death Foretold (Spanish: Crónica de una muerte anunciada; 1981), and Love in the Time of Cholera (Spanish: El amor en los tiempos del cólera; 1985).
 
Fidel is a very cultured man, when we're together we talk about literature.” — Gabriel García Márquez
 
Gabo was involved in politics and flirted with communism. He spent time in Cuba where he developed a close friendship with Fidel Castro, to whom he sent drafts of his books. Their friendship, which was mainly based on literature, has been analyzed in the 2004 book: Gabo and Fidel: Portrait of a Friendship.
 
A man of cosmic talent with the generosity of a child, a man for tomorrow, his literature is authentic proof of his sensibility and the fact that he will never give up his origins, his Latin American inspiration and loyalty to the truth.” — Fidel Castro
 
Due to his view on US imperialism and after he set up the New York branch of communist Cuba’s official news agency, Gabo was labeled as a subversive and was accused of funding leftist guerrillas at home, and for years was denied visas by US immigration authorities. The travel ban was lifted during the United States Presidency of Bill Clinton (1993–2001). In this period, he became friends with Clinton.
 
He captured the pain and joy of our common humanity in settings both real and magical. I was honoured to be his friend and to know his great heart and brilliant mind for more than 20 years.” — Bill Clinton
 
His works have achieved critical acclaim and commercial success, pioneering and popularizing the magic realism. With his books, he brought Latin America's charm and teaming contradictions to life in the minds of millions of people.
 
I would like for my books to have been recognized posthumously, at least in capitalist countries, where they turn you into a kind of merchandise.
[…]
A famous writer who wants to continue writing has to be constantly defending himself against fame. I don't really like to say this because it never sounds sincere, but I would really have liked for my books to have been published after my death, so I wouldn't have to go through all this business of fame and being a great writer. In my case, the only advantage to fame is that I have been able to give it a political use. Otherwise, it is quite uncomfortable. The problem is that you're famous for twenty-four hours a day, and you can't say, "Okay, I won't be famous until tomorrow," or press a button and say, "I won't be famous here or now."” — Interview with Peter Stone (winter 1981), The Paris Review Interviews: Writers at Work, Sixth Series (1984), pp. 336–337
 
Gabo is survived by his spouse, Mercedes Barcha, they got married in 1958, by their two sons, Rodrigo and Gonzalo, and by his works that will survive and will continue to find new readers everywhere and always.
 
TAGs: #Gabriel #García #Márquez
Watch the video: Crónica De Una Muerte Anunciada Gabriel García Marquez CINE COLOMBIANO720p H 264 AAC
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hombre llamado Santiago Nasar a manos de los hermanos Vicario, que pretenden con esta acción devolver la honra a su hermana, Ángela Vicario, por el desagravi...
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https://plus.google.com/108752301703161961022 aaja nepal : Gabriel Garcia Marquez, the Nobel-winning Colombian author who used magical realism to tell epic stories...

Gabriel Garcia Marquez, the Nobel-winning Colombian author who used magical realism to tell epic stories of love, family and dictatorship in Latin America, died Thursday at the age of 87.
Known affectionately as "Gabo," the author of "One Hundred Years of Solitude" and "Love in the Time of Cholera" was one of the world's most popular Latin American novelists and the godfather of a literary movement that witnessed a continent in turmoil.
The longtime journalist was a colorful character who befriended Cuban leader Fidel Castro, got punched by fellow Nobel laureate Mario Vargas Llosa and joked that he wrote to make his friends love him.
Presidents, writers and celebrities mourned his death, the cause of which was not immediately revealed.
"One thousand years of solitude and sadness for the death of the greatest Colombian of all time," Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos wrote on Twitter.
He later declared three days of national mourning.
"The world has lost one of its greatest visionary writers," US President Barack Obama said.
Garcia Marquez had made fewer public appearances in recent years. He was hospitalized for pneumonia on March 31 and discharged to recover at his Mexico City home.
His wife Mercedes and two sons were reportedly by his side at home when he died. A hearse later took his body to a funeral home under police escort.
Born March 6, 1927, in the village of Aracataca on Colombia's Caribbean coast, Garcia Marquez was the son of a telegraph operator.
He was raised by his grandparents and aunts in a tropical culture influenced by the heritage of Spanish settlers, indigenous populations and black slaves. His grandfather was a retired colonel.
The exotic legends of his homeland inspired him to write profusely. His masterpiece, "One Hundred Years of Solitude," was translated into 35 languages and sold more than 30 million copies.
The book, published in 1967, is a historical and literary saga about a family from the imaginary Caribbean village of Macondo between the 19th and 20th century -- a novel that turned the man with the mustache and thick eyebrows into an international star.
- 'Without a penny' -
Garcia Marquez wrote the novel after moving to Mexico City in 1961, taking a long bus ride from New York with his wife, Mercedes Barcha, and son Rodrigo.
His second son, Gonzalo, was born a year later in the Mexican capital, where the author lived for more than three decades.
He recalled arriving in Mexico City "without a name or a penny in my pocket."
The writer faced financial hardship, working for advertising agencies, penning screenplays and editing small magazines.
"As long as there was whisky, there was no misery," Garcia Marquez quipped.
The novelist owed nine months of rent payments when he penned "One Hundred Years of Solitude" and could barely afford to send the manuscript to his editor in Argentina.
Garcia Marquez wore a traditional white liqui-liqui costume with a high collar from his region to receive his Nobel prize in Sweden in 1982.
The Nobel committee rewarded him for books "in which the fantastic and the realistic are combined in a richly composed world of imagination, reflecting a continent's life and conflicts."
In his Nobel speech, Garcia Marquez said it was the "outsized reality" of brutal dictatorships and civil wars in Latin America, "and not just its literary expression," that got the attention of the Swedish Academy of Letters.
His other famous books include "Chronicle of a Death Foretold," "The General in His Labyrinth" and his autobiography "Living to Tell the Tale."
His final novel, "Memories of My Melancholy Whores," was published in 2004.
- Journalist, Castro friend -
Garcia Marquez also left his mark in journalism, which he considered "the most beautiful profession in the world."
He founded the Ibero-American New Journalism Foundation in the Colombian port city of Cartagena in 1994.
His first job was with Bogota's El Espectador newspaper, which published his first short story in 1947, paying him 800 pesos, or less than $0.50 per month.
He left for Europe after an article angered the military regime at the time, living in Geneva, Rome and Paris, where he finished the 1961 book "No One Writes to the Colonel."
An admirer of Cuba's revolution, he became a correspondent for the communist island's Prensa Latina news agency in Bogota and New York.
He forged a controversial friendship with Castro, who called him "a man with the goodness of a child and a cosmic talent."
But he also worked as an emissary between Castro and another powerful friend, then US president Bill Clinton, in the 1990s.
In Mexico, his circle of friends included renowned Mexican writers Octavio Paz and Carlos Fuentes.
"I write so that my friends will love me," the novelist quipped.
Garcia Marquez had a falling out with his friend Vargas Llosa that culminated with the Peruvian novelist punching him outside a Mexico City movie theater in 1976.
"We were completely stunned and astonished," Mexican writer Elena Poniatowska recalled in an interview.
Neither one ever revealed the pair had quarreled.
But Vargas Llosa paid tribute to Garcia Marquez, saying: "His novels will survive him and continue gaining readers everywhere."
Garcia Marquez, godfather of magic realism, dies at 87

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https://plus.google.com/118336990974761175128 Carlos Fuentes :

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https://plus.google.com/109093286812007576566 Columbia University Press : “For me, life without literature is inconceivable. I think that Don Quixote in a physical sense never...
“For me, life without literature is inconceivable. I think that Don Quixote in a physical sense never existed, but Don Quixote exists more than anybody who existed in 1605. Much more. There’s nobody who can compete with Don Quixote or with Hamlet. So in the end we have the reality of the book as the reality of the world and the reality of history.” – Carlos Fuentes
Columbia University Press » Blog Archive » Thursday Fiction Corner: A Conversation with Carlos Fuentes
“For me, life without literature is inconceivable. I think that Don Quixote in a physical sense never existed, but Don Quixote exists more than anybody who existed in 1605. Much more. There's nobody who can compete with Don Quixote or with Hamlet. So in the end we have the reality of the book as ...
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https://plus.google.com/104153350097142560782 Juan Carlos Fuentes : Carnaval Boliviano en Arlington, Virginia (HD) http://flip.it/CBPIE
Carnaval Boliviano en Arlington, Virginia (HD) http://flip.it/CBPIE
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La virgencita presente, dio inicio a una fiesta de colores, danzas típicas del oriente y altiplano boliviano llegan a los pies de la Virgen para hacer promes...
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https://plus.google.com/101611249558845528725 carlos fuentes : Recomendado
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Battle with your Pokémon on the internet!Note: This is not a RPG, you can m...
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https://plus.google.com/102597521011154870177 Carlos Fuentes :

Watch the video: junior GBP
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https://plus.google.com/115362949801851045759 Picturemation Vijon : Mexican Writer Carlos Fuentes 
Mexican Writer Carlos Fuentes 
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https://plus.google.com/110721448943600057526 CARLOS FUENTES LIMA : Marley at night
Marley at night
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