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https://plus.google.com/113807443797571756438 Kevin Evans : On this day: At 28th July of 1984, the 23rd Summer Olympic Games opened at the Los Angeles Coliseum ...
On this day:
At 28th July of 1984, the 23rd Summer Olympic Games opened at the Los Angeles Coliseum in Southern California. Peter V. Ueberroth, head of the U.S. Olympic Committee, welcomed 7,800 athletes from 140 nations during the 3-1/2 hour opening ceremonies.

In the late 1970s, hosting the Olympics was not a very desirable thing for a city to do. The games were seen as financially risky: Montreal's debt from the 1976 Summer Games totaled $1.5 billion dollars, which wasn't paid off until 2006. Denver was actually awarded the 1976 Winter Games but its voters did not approve public funding, so it went to Innsbruck, Austria. Plus, tensions were high when it came to international athletic competitions. Munich had suffered a deadly hostage crisis in 1972 and the Cold War was brewing. 

The 1980 games in Moscow were boycotted by the U.S. and other countries, and the U.S.S.R. and many other Eastern European boycotted the 1984 games. An early front-runner, Tehran, pulled out from the 1984 bidding process at the last minute due to social unrest. In the end, only two cities officially bid to host the 1984 Summer Games: New York City and Los Angeles. Since the U.S. could only recommend one city for the international bid, when they decided on L.A. to represent the U.S., it became the winning city by default.

The Olympics are essentially a high-profile opportunity for civic rebranding: A chance for a smaller city to put itself on the map or for a larger one to reinvent itself. While L.A. was by no means a tiny hamlet looking for validation, the city was certainly hoping to turn around its reputation as a smoggy, sprawling megalopolis lacking a center or any real civic pride. Detractors were quick to judge the choice of L.A. as too big, too unprepared, and too financially strapped. Plus, L.A. had already hosted the Summer Olympics once, back in 1932. But L.A. did have one real handicap: the 1984 Summer Olympics were the first in history not to be sponsored by the government, as they still are in many countries and had previously been in the U.S.

This called for a budget-conscious Olympics, headed by local businessman Peter Ueberroth. He organized a committee that functioned more like a corporation, dubbing it LA84 and creating a board consisting of entrepreneurs and other financially savvy leaders. Accordingly, the games would be funded by unprecedented corporate sponsorships, impressive private fundraising, and, for the first time on U.S. soil, television deals. The committee sold the television rights to the broadcast to ABC for $225 million, raising a large amount of money far in advance of the games. Leave it up to the entertainment capital of the world to strike such a smart deal.

L.A.'s fiscally responsible philosophy extended to its innovative architectural strategy. The building frenzy that accompanies a winning bid is often followed by a devastating post-Olympics blow, where the city is left with rotting stadiums and empty transit systems. This is most infamously illustrated in Athens, Greece; there, not only are most of the city's 2004 venues now empty and dilapidated, but it has been theorized that the egregious expenses may have actually contributed to Greece's ongoing financial crisis. Nagano, Japan, also fell into a recession after their 1998 Winter Olympics. Much of this is illustrated in The Olympic City, where Gary Hustwit and Jon Pack traveled to hosting cities to document what happens after the games leave.

Also, as we've seen in Sochi—which is building entire towns, not to mention a whole new highway and tunnel to access them—the infrastructural additions are often so ambitious that they aren't ready in time. Olympic cities rarely are. In Montreal in 1976, their Olympic stadium was not finished when the games began due to construction issues and labor strikes. Not finished, meaning: It was supposed to have roof, and it didn't—for 11 years.

Los Angeles's committee decided it would not allow any new sporting structures to be built. Instead they modified and upgraded existing venues. The opening ceremonies and track and field events were held in the Coliseum, which was built in 1932. Apartment villages for visiting athletes were repurposed as dorm rooms for nearby schools. The only new sporting venues were heavily financed by corporate sponsors and are still in use today.

Back then, committees only had about five years from the awarding of the games to the opening ceremonies—today's host cities get almost ten years of strategizing. A design team was quickly assembled that included leadership from two prominent design firms, Jerde Partnership and Sussman/Prejza, as well as many other firms and designers, who worked together at a studio on 8th Street in downtown Los Angeles. L.A. graphic artist Robert Miles Runyan was tapped to create the ''Stars in Motion'' logo: five stars which looked as if they were racing forward.

Faced with a minuscule budget of $10 million and a ticking clock, the designers quickly realized they would have to use materials which were affordable and plentiful to design thousands of pieces from programs to signage to temporary buildings. Inspired by the Pacific Rim, the team looked at the temporary tents and altars which were built for festivals.

Instead of hulking sculptures and tall towers which had been erected in many other cities, the team used inflatables and modified scaffolding to build simple, colorful landmarks. Signage and wayfinding was made from painted wood and Sonotubes—pretty much giant cardboard tubes like you'd find in the center of a roll of gift wrap— with a vinyl striping system. The structures were effective, inexpensive, and completely ephemeral.

As part of the lucrative TV deal that helped finance the games, LA84 would be the first games to truly become a global television event. Although many games had parts televised in some form before 1984, this broadcast would run 180 hours and be seen by the largest audience in history, not to mention very enthusiastic American fans. Knowing this, the designers focused on elements that would translate well on the small screen, with bright colors and big graphic impact. Tiny metal reflectors, like you see at car dealerships, were employed to add sparkle to buildings.

Design also helped to make Southern California's 88 cities and multiple counties, many with their own identities—feel like they were part of the same small town. With 42 venues sprinkled throughout a 305 square-mile region, some venues were 100 miles away from each other!—there was no real sense of continuity between locations (except maybe the presence of palm trees ?). The branding, which was repeated in elements across the landscape, helped to knit together an incredibly large area and create an identifiable sense of place. To global audience watching from home, this was, and will always be, L.A.

But the world was also watching for another reason: to see if L.A.'s famously suburban landscape could handle it. It was by far the most spatially dispersed summer games of all time. Residents fretted about L.A.'s normally horrible traffic becoming paralyzing. But the apocalyptic gridlock never happened. "Olympic fever" took hold. People stayed home, carpooled and used shuttles, and the city was miraculously navigable.

In 1979, the L.A. organizing committee had made a deal. If the games saw any profits, LA84 would give 60 percent back to the U.S. Olympic Committee and keep 40 percent for Southern California. At the end of the games, the total expenditures came in at a respectable $546 million, but even more impressive was the profit: A surplus of $232.5 million, meaning $93 million would stay in the region. This was huge. The only other games at the time which could claim to be financially successful at all were the other L.A. Olympics: The ones held in the city in 1932.

The profits were used to create an endowment called the LA84 Foundation, which funds youth sporting events, resources, and facilities throughout the area. With smart management, the endowment has grown over the years, and over $214 million has helped an estimated three million children and 1,100 organizations in Southern California. Recently, the LA84 Foundation helped raise money to pay coaches and buy equipment at LAUSD high schools after budget cuts decimated their programs.

What Los Angeles was able to do was bring some foresight to the hosting of the games by looking at what will be left for the city after the athletes, press, and spectators have gone home. Not every city to host the games since has learned this lesson, of course. But Los Angeles became a model for cities like Barcelona (1992) and Atlanta (1996), which orchestrated both successful games and positive development which revitalized their urban cores, and not at the expense of residents. Although other Olympic cities have been profitable, it remains the most financially successful Olympic games—by far.

L.A. also helped make the Olympics something for a city to be proud of again. Striking, innovative design that captured the imagination of both its residents and a global audience made the city feel visually united. Los Angeles itself was made smaller by the experience, seeing itself not just as a city but as a region, with far-flung communities that for the first time felt like they were part of this growing swell of Southern California pride. If it could happen in L.A., it could happen anywhere.

The first gold medal to be awarded at the Los Angeles Olympics was also the first-ever medal to be won by an athlete from China when Xu Haifeng won the 50 m Pistol event. Archer Neroli Fairhall from New Zealand was the first paraplegic Olympian at any Olympic Games, coming 35th in the Women's individual event. Synchronized swimming and rhythmic gymnastics debuted in Los Angeles as Olympic events, as did wind surfing.

Li Ning from the People's Republic of China won 6 medals in gymnastics, 3 gold, 2 silver, and 1 bronze, earning him the nickname "Prince of Gymnasts" in China. Li would later light the Olympic Cauldron at the 2008 Olympics. Steve Redgrave won his first title in rowing of the record five he would go on to win in five Olympic competitions. Victor Davis set a new world record in winning the gold medal in the 200-metre breaststroke in swimming. Mary Lou Retton became the first gymnast outside Eastern Europe to win the gymnastics all-around competition.

France won the Olympic football tournament, defeating Brazil 2–0 in the final. Olympic football was unexpectedly played before massive crowds throughout America, with several sell-outs at the 100,000+ seat Rose Bowl. This interest eventually led to the US hosting the 1994 FIFA World Cup. The Soviet-led boycott affected weightlifting more than any other sport: 94 of the world's top 100 ranked lifters were absent, as were 29 of the 30 medalists from the recent world championships. All 10 of the defending world champions in the 10 weight categories were absent.

Future Dream Team members Michael Jordan, Patrick Ewing, and Chris Mullin were on the team that won the gold medal in basketball. The 1984 US men's Olympic basketball team was coached by Indiana Hoosiers head coach Bobby Knight. Carl Lewis, making his first of four appearances at the Olympics, equaled the 1936 performance of Jesse Owens by winning four gold medals, in the 100 m, 200 m, 4x100 m relay and long jump.

Eighteen-year-old Zola Budd, a South African runner given British citizenship in order to dodge the apartheid-based ban on South African competitors, collided with home favourite Mary Decker-Slaney in the final of the 3000 m, causing the American to fall. With the crowd booing her for the rest of the race, Budd dropped back and finished well down the order. She was later cleared of wrongdoing and was also declared not culpable by Decker-Slaney. 

Carlos Lopes, from Portugal, won the Marathon with a time of 2:09:21, an Olympic record that stood for 24 years. It was the first gold medal ever for Portugal. Gold medal favourite, World Record holder and the then World Champion, Robert de Castella from Australia, finished in 5th place, 1:48 behind Lopes. Daley Thompson apparently missed a new world record in winning his second consecutive gold medal in the decathlon; the next year his score was retroactively raised to 8847, giving him the record.

Los Angeles is reportedly planning to bid for the 2024 games, which would make for a nice 40th anniversary celebration of its most shining moment.

#OlympicGames     #SummerOlympicGames
#80sMemories     #Olympics
#LosAngeles     #LA
#LA84     #Sports
#Onthisday     #SportEvent
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-ayJZd1I-6lw/Vbdkfgk649I/AAAAAAAAcoU/OPZyRkIIk7c/w506-h750/Los%2BAngeles%2B84.jpg
6 hours ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/100079786914762981249 Lisa Fulkerson : On this day: At 28th July of 1984, the 23rd Summer Olympic Games opened at the Los Angeles Coliseum ...
On this day:
At 28th July of 1984, the 23rd Summer Olympic Games opened at the Los Angeles Coliseum in Southern California. Peter V. Ueberroth, head of the U.S. Olympic Committee, welcomed 7,800 athletes from 140 nations during the 3-1/2 hour opening ceremonies.

In the late 1970s, hosting the Olympics was not a very desirable thing for a city to do. The games were seen as financially risky: Montreal's debt from the 1976 Summer Games totaled $1.5 billion dollars, which wasn't paid off until 2006. Denver was actually awarded the 1976 Winter Games but its voters did not approve public funding, so it went to Innsbruck, Austria. Plus, tensions were high when it came to international athletic competitions. Munich had suffered a deadly hostage crisis in 1972 and the Cold War was brewing. 

The 1980 games in Moscow were boycotted by the U.S. and other countries, and the U.S.S.R. and many other Eastern European boycotted the 1984 games. An early front-runner, Tehran, pulled out from the 1984 bidding process at the last minute due to social unrest. In the end, only two cities officially bid to host the 1984 Summer Games: New York City and Los Angeles. Since the U.S. could only recommend one city for the international bid, when they decided on L.A. to represent the U.S., it became the winning city by default.

The Olympics are essentially a high-profile opportunity for civic rebranding: A chance for a smaller city to put itself on the map or for a larger one to reinvent itself. While L.A. was by no means a tiny hamlet looking for validation, the city was certainly hoping to turn around its reputation as a smoggy, sprawling megalopolis lacking a center or any real civic pride. Detractors were quick to judge the choice of L.A. as too big, too unprepared, and too financially strapped. Plus, L.A. had already hosted the Summer Olympics once, back in 1932. But L.A. did have one real handicap: the 1984 Summer Olympics were the first in history not to be sponsored by the government, as they still are in many countries and had previously been in the U.S.

This called for a budget-conscious Olympics, headed by local businessman Peter Ueberroth. He organized a committee that functioned more like a corporation, dubbing it LA84 and creating a board consisting of entrepreneurs and other financially savvy leaders. Accordingly, the games would be funded by unprecedented corporate sponsorships, impressive private fundraising, and, for the first time on U.S. soil, television deals. The committee sold the television rights to the broadcast to ABC for $225 million, raising a large amount of money far in advance of the games. Leave it up to the entertainment capital of the world to strike such a smart deal.

L.A.'s fiscally responsible philosophy extended to its innovative architectural strategy. The building frenzy that accompanies a winning bid is often followed by a devastating post-Olympics blow, where the city is left with rotting stadiums and empty transit systems. This is most infamously illustrated in Athens, Greece; there, not only are most of the city's 2004 venues now empty and dilapidated, but it has been theorized that the egregious expenses may have actually contributed to Greece's ongoing financial crisis. Nagano, Japan, also fell into a recession after their 1998 Winter Olympics. Much of this is illustrated in The Olympic City, where Gary Hustwit and Jon Pack traveled to hosting cities to document what happens after the games leave.

Also, as we've seen in Sochi—which is building entire towns, not to mention a whole new highway and tunnel to access them—the infrastructural additions are often so ambitious that they aren't ready in time. Olympic cities rarely are. In Montreal in 1976, their Olympic stadium was not finished when the games began due to construction issues and labor strikes. Not finished, meaning: It was supposed to have roof, and it didn't—for 11 years.

Los Angeles's committee decided it would not allow any new sporting structures to be built. Instead they modified and upgraded existing venues. The opening ceremonies and track and field events were held in the Coliseum, which was built in 1932. Apartment villages for visiting athletes were repurposed as dorm rooms for nearby schools. The only new sporting venues were heavily financed by corporate sponsors and are still in use today.

Back then, committees only had about five years from the awarding of the games to the opening ceremonies—today's host cities get almost ten years of strategizing. A design team was quickly assembled that included leadership from two prominent design firms, Jerde Partnership and Sussman/Prejza, as well as many other firms and designers, who worked together at a studio on 8th Street in downtown Los Angeles. L.A. graphic artist Robert Miles Runyan was tapped to create the ''Stars in Motion'' logo: five stars which looked as if they were racing forward.

Faced with a minuscule budget of $10 million and a ticking clock, the designers quickly realized they would have to use materials which were affordable and plentiful to design thousands of pieces from programs to signage to temporary buildings. Inspired by the Pacific Rim, the team looked at the temporary tents and altars which were built for festivals.

Instead of hulking sculptures and tall towers which had been erected in many other cities, the team used inflatables and modified scaffolding to build simple, colorful landmarks. Signage and wayfinding was made from painted wood and Sonotubes—pretty much giant cardboard tubes like you'd find in the center of a roll of gift wrap— with a vinyl striping system. The structures were effective, inexpensive, and completely ephemeral.

As part of the lucrative TV deal that helped finance the games, LA84 would be the first games to truly become a global television event. Although many games had parts televised in some form before 1984, this broadcast would run 180 hours and be seen by the largest audience in history, not to mention very enthusiastic American fans. Knowing this, the designers focused on elements that would translate well on the small screen, with bright colors and big graphic impact. Tiny metal reflectors, like you see at car dealerships, were employed to add sparkle to buildings.

Design also helped to make Southern California's 88 cities and multiple counties, many with their own identities—feel like they were part of the same small town. With 42 venues sprinkled throughout a 305 square-mile region, some venues were 100 miles away from each other!—there was no real sense of continuity between locations (except maybe the presence of palm trees ?). The branding, which was repeated in elements across the landscape, helped to knit together an incredibly large area and create an identifiable sense of place. To global audience watching from home, this was, and will always be, L.A.

But the world was also watching for another reason: to see if L.A.'s famously suburban landscape could handle it. It was by far the most spatially dispersed summer games of all time. Residents fretted about L.A.'s normally horrible traffic becoming paralyzing. But the apocalyptic gridlock never happened. "Olympic fever" took hold. People stayed home, carpooled and used shuttles, and the city was miraculously navigable.

In 1979, the L.A. organizing committee had made a deal. If the games saw any profits, LA84 would give 60 percent back to the U.S. Olympic Committee and keep 40 percent for Southern California. At the end of the games, the total expenditures came in at a respectable $546 million, but even more impressive was the profit: A surplus of $232.5 million, meaning $93 million would stay in the region. This was huge. The only other games at the time which could claim to be financially successful at all were the other L.A. Olympics: The ones held in the city in 1932.

The profits were used to create an endowment called the LA84 Foundation, which funds youth sporting events, resources, and facilities throughout the area. With smart management, the endowment has grown over the years, and over $214 million has helped an estimated three million children and 1,100 organizations in Southern California. Recently, the LA84 Foundation helped raise money to pay coaches and buy equipment at LAUSD high schools after budget cuts decimated their programs.

What Los Angeles was able to do was bring some foresight to the hosting of the games by looking at what will be left for the city after the athletes, press, and spectators have gone home. Not every city to host the games since has learned this lesson, of course. But Los Angeles became a model for cities like Barcelona (1992) and Atlanta (1996), which orchestrated both successful games and positive development which revitalized their urban cores, and not at the expense of residents. Although other Olympic cities have been profitable, it remains the most financially successful Olympic games—by far.

L.A. also helped make the Olympics something for a city to be proud of again. Striking, innovative design that captured the imagination of both its residents and a global audience made the city feel visually united. Los Angeles itself was made smaller by the experience, seeing itself not just as a city but as a region, with far-flung communities that for the first time felt like they were part of this growing swell of Southern California pride. If it could happen in L.A., it could happen anywhere.

The first gold medal to be awarded at the Los Angeles Olympics was also the first-ever medal to be won by an athlete from China when Xu Haifeng won the 50 m Pistol event. Archer Neroli Fairhall from New Zealand was the first paraplegic Olympian at any Olympic Games, coming 35th in the Women's individual event. Synchronized swimming and rhythmic gymnastics debuted in Los Angeles as Olympic events, as did wind surfing.

Li Ning from the People's Republic of China won 6 medals in gymnastics, 3 gold, 2 silver, and 1 bronze, earning him the nickname "Prince of Gymnasts" in China. Li would later light the Olympic Cauldron at the 2008 Olympics. Steve Redgrave won his first title in rowing of the record five he would go on to win in five Olympic competitions. Victor Davis set a new world record in winning the gold medal in the 200-metre breaststroke in swimming. Mary Lou Retton became the first gymnast outside Eastern Europe to win the gymnastics all-around competition.

France won the Olympic football tournament, defeating Brazil 2–0 in the final. Olympic football was unexpectedly played before massive crowds throughout America, with several sell-outs at the 100,000+ seat Rose Bowl. This interest eventually led to the US hosting the 1994 FIFA World Cup. The Soviet-led boycott affected weightlifting more than any other sport: 94 of the world's top 100 ranked lifters were absent, as were 29 of the 30 medalists from the recent world championships. All 10 of the defending world champions in the 10 weight categories were absent.

Future Dream Team members Michael Jordan, Patrick Ewing, and Chris Mullin were on the team that won the gold medal in basketball. The 1984 US men's Olympic basketball team was coached by Indiana Hoosiers head coach Bobby Knight. Carl Lewis, making his first of four appearances at the Olympics, equaled the 1936 performance of Jesse Owens by winning four gold medals, in the 100 m, 200 m, 4x100 m relay and long jump.

Eighteen-year-old Zola Budd, a South African runner given British citizenship in order to dodge the apartheid-based ban on South African competitors, collided with home favourite Mary Decker-Slaney in the final of the 3000 m, causing the American to fall. With the crowd booing her for the rest of the race, Budd dropped back and finished well down the order. She was later cleared of wrongdoing and was also declared not culpable by Decker-Slaney. 

Carlos Lopes, from Portugal, won the Marathon with a time of 2:09:21, an Olympic record that stood for 24 years. It was the first gold medal ever for Portugal. Gold medal favourite, World Record holder and the then World Champion, Robert de Castella from Australia, finished in 5th place, 1:48 behind Lopes. Daley Thompson apparently missed a new world record in winning his second consecutive gold medal in the decathlon; the next year his score was retroactively raised to 8847, giving him the record.

Los Angeles is reportedly planning to bid for the 2024 games, which would make for a nice 40th anniversary celebration of its most shining moment.

#OlympicGames     #SummerOlympicGames
#80sMemories     #Olympics
#LosAngeles     #LA
#LA84     #Sports
#Onthisday     #SportEvent
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-ayJZd1I-6lw/Vbdkfgk649I/AAAAAAAAcoU/OPZyRkIIk7c/w506-h750/Los%2BAngeles%2B84.jpg
7 hours ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/117992924801566642024 Donald Tso : On this day: At 28th July of 1984, the 23rd Summer Olympic Games opened at the Los Angeles Coliseum ...
On this day:
At 28th July of 1984, the 23rd Summer Olympic Games opened at the Los Angeles Coliseum in Southern California. Peter V. Ueberroth, head of the U.S. Olympic Committee, welcomed 7,800 athletes from 140 nations during the 3-1/2 hour opening ceremonies.

In the late 1970s, hosting the Olympics was not a very desirable thing for a city to do. The games were seen as financially risky: Montreal's debt from the 1976 Summer Games totaled $1.5 billion dollars, which wasn't paid off until 2006. Denver was actually awarded the 1976 Winter Games but its voters did not approve public funding, so it went to Innsbruck, Austria. Plus, tensions were high when it came to international athletic competitions. Munich had suffered a deadly hostage crisis in 1972 and the Cold War was brewing. 

The 1980 games in Moscow were boycotted by the U.S. and other countries, and the U.S.S.R. and many other Eastern European boycotted the 1984 games. An early front-runner, Tehran, pulled out from the 1984 bidding process at the last minute due to social unrest. In the end, only two cities officially bid to host the 1984 Summer Games: New York City and Los Angeles. Since the U.S. could only recommend one city for the international bid, when they decided on L.A. to represent the U.S., it became the winning city by default.

The Olympics are essentially a high-profile opportunity for civic rebranding: A chance for a smaller city to put itself on the map or for a larger one to reinvent itself. While L.A. was by no means a tiny hamlet looking for validation, the city was certainly hoping to turn around its reputation as a smoggy, sprawling megalopolis lacking a center or any real civic pride. Detractors were quick to judge the choice of L.A. as too big, too unprepared, and too financially strapped. Plus, L.A. had already hosted the Summer Olympics once, back in 1932. But L.A. did have one real handicap: the 1984 Summer Olympics were the first in history not to be sponsored by the government, as they still are in many countries and had previously been in the U.S.

This called for a budget-conscious Olympics, headed by local businessman Peter Ueberroth. He organized a committee that functioned more like a corporation, dubbing it LA84 and creating a board consisting of entrepreneurs and other financially savvy leaders. Accordingly, the games would be funded by unprecedented corporate sponsorships, impressive private fundraising, and, for the first time on U.S. soil, television deals. The committee sold the television rights to the broadcast to ABC for $225 million, raising a large amount of money far in advance of the games. Leave it up to the entertainment capital of the world to strike such a smart deal.

L.A.'s fiscally responsible philosophy extended to its innovative architectural strategy. The building frenzy that accompanies a winning bid is often followed by a devastating post-Olympics blow, where the city is left with rotting stadiums and empty transit systems. This is most infamously illustrated in Athens, Greece; there, not only are most of the city's 2004 venues now empty and dilapidated, but it has been theorized that the egregious expenses may have actually contributed to Greece's ongoing financial crisis. Nagano, Japan, also fell into a recession after their 1998 Winter Olympics. Much of this is illustrated in The Olympic City, where Gary Hustwit and Jon Pack traveled to hosting cities to document what happens after the games leave.

Also, as we've seen in Sochi—which is building entire towns, not to mention a whole new highway and tunnel to access them—the infrastructural additions are often so ambitious that they aren't ready in time. Olympic cities rarely are. In Montreal in 1976, their Olympic stadium was not finished when the games began due to construction issues and labor strikes. Not finished, meaning: It was supposed to have roof, and it didn't—for 11 years.

Los Angeles's committee decided it would not allow any new sporting structures to be built. Instead they modified and upgraded existing venues. The opening ceremonies and track and field events were held in the Coliseum, which was built in 1932. Apartment villages for visiting athletes were repurposed as dorm rooms for nearby schools. The only new sporting venues were heavily financed by corporate sponsors and are still in use today.

Back then, committees only had about five years from the awarding of the games to the opening ceremonies—today's host cities get almost ten years of strategizing. A design team was quickly assembled that included leadership from two prominent design firms, Jerde Partnership and Sussman/Prejza, as well as many other firms and designers, who worked together at a studio on 8th Street in downtown Los Angeles. L.A. graphic artist Robert Miles Runyan was tapped to create the ''Stars in Motion'' logo: five stars which looked as if they were racing forward.

Faced with a minuscule budget of $10 million and a ticking clock, the designers quickly realized they would have to use materials which were affordable and plentiful to design thousands of pieces from programs to signage to temporary buildings. Inspired by the Pacific Rim, the team looked at the temporary tents and altars which were built for festivals.

Instead of hulking sculptures and tall towers which had been erected in many other cities, the team used inflatables and modified scaffolding to build simple, colorful landmarks. Signage and wayfinding was made from painted wood and Sonotubes—pretty much giant cardboard tubes like you'd find in the center of a roll of gift wrap— with a vinyl striping system. The structures were effective, inexpensive, and completely ephemeral.

As part of the lucrative TV deal that helped finance the games, LA84 would be the first games to truly become a global television event. Although many games had parts televised in some form before 1984, this broadcast would run 180 hours and be seen by the largest audience in history, not to mention very enthusiastic American fans. Knowing this, the designers focused on elements that would translate well on the small screen, with bright colors and big graphic impact. Tiny metal reflectors, like you see at car dealerships, were employed to add sparkle to buildings.

Design also helped to make Southern California's 88 cities and multiple counties, many with their own identities—feel like they were part of the same small town. With 42 venues sprinkled throughout a 305 square-mile region, some venues were 100 miles away from each other!—there was no real sense of continuity between locations (except maybe the presence of palm trees ?). The branding, which was repeated in elements across the landscape, helped to knit together an incredibly large area and create an identifiable sense of place. To global audience watching from home, this was, and will always be, L.A.

But the world was also watching for another reason: to see if L.A.'s famously suburban landscape could handle it. It was by far the most spatially dispersed summer games of all time. Residents fretted about L.A.'s normally horrible traffic becoming paralyzing. But the apocalyptic gridlock never happened. "Olympic fever" took hold. People stayed home, carpooled and used shuttles, and the city was miraculously navigable.

In 1979, the L.A. organizing committee had made a deal. If the games saw any profits, LA84 would give 60 percent back to the U.S. Olympic Committee and keep 40 percent for Southern California. At the end of the games, the total expenditures came in at a respectable $546 million, but even more impressive was the profit: A surplus of $232.5 million, meaning $93 million would stay in the region. This was huge. The only other games at the time which could claim to be financially successful at all were the other L.A. Olympics: The ones held in the city in 1932.

The profits were used to create an endowment called the LA84 Foundation, which funds youth sporting events, resources, and facilities throughout the area. With smart management, the endowment has grown over the years, and over $214 million has helped an estimated three million children and 1,100 organizations in Southern California. Recently, the LA84 Foundation helped raise money to pay coaches and buy equipment at LAUSD high schools after budget cuts decimated their programs.

What Los Angeles was able to do was bring some foresight to the hosting of the games by looking at what will be left for the city after the athletes, press, and spectators have gone home. Not every city to host the games since has learned this lesson, of course. But Los Angeles became a model for cities like Barcelona (1992) and Atlanta (1996), which orchestrated both successful games and positive development which revitalized their urban cores, and not at the expense of residents. Although other Olympic cities have been profitable, it remains the most financially successful Olympic games—by far.

L.A. also helped make the Olympics something for a city to be proud of again. Striking, innovative design that captured the imagination of both its residents and a global audience made the city feel visually united. Los Angeles itself was made smaller by the experience, seeing itself not just as a city but as a region, with far-flung communities that for the first time felt like they were part of this growing swell of Southern California pride. If it could happen in L.A., it could happen anywhere.

The first gold medal to be awarded at the Los Angeles Olympics was also the first-ever medal to be won by an athlete from China when Xu Haifeng won the 50 m Pistol event. Archer Neroli Fairhall from New Zealand was the first paraplegic Olympian at any Olympic Games, coming 35th in the Women's individual event. Synchronized swimming and rhythmic gymnastics debuted in Los Angeles as Olympic events, as did wind surfing.

Li Ning from the People's Republic of China won 6 medals in gymnastics, 3 gold, 2 silver, and 1 bronze, earning him the nickname "Prince of Gymnasts" in China. Li would later light the Olympic Cauldron at the 2008 Olympics. Steve Redgrave won his first title in rowing of the record five he would go on to win in five Olympic competitions. Victor Davis set a new world record in winning the gold medal in the 200-metre breaststroke in swimming. Mary Lou Retton became the first gymnast outside Eastern Europe to win the gymnastics all-around competition.

France won the Olympic football tournament, defeating Brazil 2–0 in the final. Olympic football was unexpectedly played before massive crowds throughout America, with several sell-outs at the 100,000+ seat Rose Bowl. This interest eventually led to the US hosting the 1994 FIFA World Cup. The Soviet-led boycott affected weightlifting more than any other sport: 94 of the world's top 100 ranked lifters were absent, as were 29 of the 30 medalists from the recent world championships. All 10 of the defending world champions in the 10 weight categories were absent.

Future Dream Team members Michael Jordan, Patrick Ewing, and Chris Mullin were on the team that won the gold medal in basketball. The 1984 US men's Olympic basketball team was coached by Indiana Hoosiers head coach Bobby Knight. Carl Lewis, making his first of four appearances at the Olympics, equaled the 1936 performance of Jesse Owens by winning four gold medals, in the 100 m, 200 m, 4x100 m relay and long jump.

Eighteen-year-old Zola Budd, a South African runner given British citizenship in order to dodge the apartheid-based ban on South African competitors, collided with home favourite Mary Decker-Slaney in the final of the 3000 m, causing the American to fall. With the crowd booing her for the rest of the race, Budd dropped back and finished well down the order. She was later cleared of wrongdoing and was also declared not culpable by Decker-Slaney. 

Carlos Lopes, from Portugal, won the Marathon with a time of 2:09:21, an Olympic record that stood for 24 years. It was the first gold medal ever for Portugal. Gold medal favourite, World Record holder and the then World Champion, Robert de Castella from Australia, finished in 5th place, 1:48 behind Lopes. Daley Thompson apparently missed a new world record in winning his second consecutive gold medal in the decathlon; the next year his score was retroactively raised to 8847, giving him the record.

Los Angeles is reportedly planning to bid for the 2024 games, which would make for a nice 40th anniversary celebration of its most shining moment.

#OlympicGames     #SummerOlympicGames
#80sMemories     #Olympics
#LosAngeles     #LA
#LA84     #Sports
#Onthisday     #SportEvent
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-ayJZd1I-6lw/Vbdkfgk649I/AAAAAAAAcoU/OPZyRkIIk7c/w506-h750/Los%2BAngeles%2B84.jpg
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https://plus.google.com/112033878461441224809 DiDee Marley : On this day: At 28th July of 1984, the 23rd Summer Olympic Games opened at the Los Angeles Coliseum ...
On this day:
At 28th July of 1984, the 23rd Summer Olympic Games opened at the Los Angeles Coliseum in Southern California. Peter V. Ueberroth, head of the U.S. Olympic Committee, welcomed 7,800 athletes from 140 nations during the 3-1/2 hour opening ceremonies.

In the late 1970s, hosting the Olympics was not a very desirable thing for a city to do. The games were seen as financially risky: Montreal's debt from the 1976 Summer Games totaled $1.5 billion dollars, which wasn't paid off until 2006. Denver was actually awarded the 1976 Winter Games but its voters did not approve public funding, so it went to Innsbruck, Austria. Plus, tensions were high when it came to international athletic competitions. Munich had suffered a deadly hostage crisis in 1972 and the Cold War was brewing. 

The 1980 games in Moscow were boycotted by the U.S. and other countries, and the U.S.S.R. and many other Eastern European boycotted the 1984 games. An early front-runner, Tehran, pulled out from the 1984 bidding process at the last minute due to social unrest. In the end, only two cities officially bid to host the 1984 Summer Games: New York City and Los Angeles. Since the U.S. could only recommend one city for the international bid, when they decided on L.A. to represent the U.S., it became the winning city by default.

The Olympics are essentially a high-profile opportunity for civic rebranding: A chance for a smaller city to put itself on the map or for a larger one to reinvent itself. While L.A. was by no means a tiny hamlet looking for validation, the city was certainly hoping to turn around its reputation as a smoggy, sprawling megalopolis lacking a center or any real civic pride. Detractors were quick to judge the choice of L.A. as too big, too unprepared, and too financially strapped. Plus, L.A. had already hosted the Summer Olympics once, back in 1932. But L.A. did have one real handicap: the 1984 Summer Olympics were the first in history not to be sponsored by the government, as they still are in many countries and had previously been in the U.S.

This called for a budget-conscious Olympics, headed by local businessman Peter Ueberroth. He organized a committee that functioned more like a corporation, dubbing it LA84 and creating a board consisting of entrepreneurs and other financially savvy leaders. Accordingly, the games would be funded by unprecedented corporate sponsorships, impressive private fundraising, and, for the first time on U.S. soil, television deals. The committee sold the television rights to the broadcast to ABC for $225 million, raising a large amount of money far in advance of the games. Leave it up to the entertainment capital of the world to strike such a smart deal.

L.A.'s fiscally responsible philosophy extended to its innovative architectural strategy. The building frenzy that accompanies a winning bid is often followed by a devastating post-Olympics blow, where the city is left with rotting stadiums and empty transit systems. This is most infamously illustrated in Athens, Greece; there, not only are most of the city's 2004 venues now empty and dilapidated, but it has been theorized that the egregious expenses may have actually contributed to Greece's ongoing financial crisis. Nagano, Japan, also fell into a recession after their 1998 Winter Olympics. Much of this is illustrated in The Olympic City, where Gary Hustwit and Jon Pack traveled to hosting cities to document what happens after the games leave.

Also, as we've seen in Sochi—which is building entire towns, not to mention a whole new highway and tunnel to access them—the infrastructural additions are often so ambitious that they aren't ready in time. Olympic cities rarely are. In Montreal in 1976, their Olympic stadium was not finished when the games began due to construction issues and labor strikes. Not finished, meaning: It was supposed to have roof, and it didn't—for 11 years.

Los Angeles's committee decided it would not allow any new sporting structures to be built. Instead they modified and upgraded existing venues. The opening ceremonies and track and field events were held in the Coliseum, which was built in 1932. Apartment villages for visiting athletes were repurposed as dorm rooms for nearby schools. The only new sporting venues were heavily financed by corporate sponsors and are still in use today.

Back then, committees only had about five years from the awarding of the games to the opening ceremonies—today's host cities get almost ten years of strategizing. A design team was quickly assembled that included leadership from two prominent design firms, Jerde Partnership and Sussman/Prejza, as well as many other firms and designers, who worked together at a studio on 8th Street in downtown Los Angeles. L.A. graphic artist Robert Miles Runyan was tapped to create the ''Stars in Motion'' logo: five stars which looked as if they were racing forward.

Faced with a minuscule budget of $10 million and a ticking clock, the designers quickly realized they would have to use materials which were affordable and plentiful to design thousands of pieces from programs to signage to temporary buildings. Inspired by the Pacific Rim, the team looked at the temporary tents and altars which were built for festivals.

Instead of hulking sculptures and tall towers which had been erected in many other cities, the team used inflatables and modified scaffolding to build simple, colorful landmarks. Signage and wayfinding was made from painted wood and Sonotubes—pretty much giant cardboard tubes like you'd find in the center of a roll of gift wrap— with a vinyl striping system. The structures were effective, inexpensive, and completely ephemeral.

As part of the lucrative TV deal that helped finance the games, LA84 would be the first games to truly become a global television event. Although many games had parts televised in some form before 1984, this broadcast would run 180 hours and be seen by the largest audience in history, not to mention very enthusiastic American fans. Knowing this, the designers focused on elements that would translate well on the small screen, with bright colors and big graphic impact. Tiny metal reflectors, like you see at car dealerships, were employed to add sparkle to buildings.

Design also helped to make Southern California's 88 cities and multiple counties, many with their own identities—feel like they were part of the same small town. With 42 venues sprinkled throughout a 305 square-mile region, some venues were 100 miles away from each other!—there was no real sense of continuity between locations (except maybe the presence of palm trees ?). The branding, which was repeated in elements across the landscape, helped to knit together an incredibly large area and create an identifiable sense of place. To global audience watching from home, this was, and will always be, L.A.

But the world was also watching for another reason: to see if L.A.'s famously suburban landscape could handle it. It was by far the most spatially dispersed summer games of all time. Residents fretted about L.A.'s normally horrible traffic becoming paralyzing. But the apocalyptic gridlock never happened. "Olympic fever" took hold. People stayed home, carpooled and used shuttles, and the city was miraculously navigable.

In 1979, the L.A. organizing committee had made a deal. If the games saw any profits, LA84 would give 60 percent back to the U.S. Olympic Committee and keep 40 percent for Southern California. At the end of the games, the total expenditures came in at a respectable $546 million, but even more impressive was the profit: A surplus of $232.5 million, meaning $93 million would stay in the region. This was huge. The only other games at the time which could claim to be financially successful at all were the other L.A. Olympics: The ones held in the city in 1932.

The profits were used to create an endowment called the LA84 Foundation, which funds youth sporting events, resources, and facilities throughout the area. With smart management, the endowment has grown over the years, and over $214 million has helped an estimated three million children and 1,100 organizations in Southern California. Recently, the LA84 Foundation helped raise money to pay coaches and buy equipment at LAUSD high schools after budget cuts decimated their programs.

What Los Angeles was able to do was bring some foresight to the hosting of the games by looking at what will be left for the city after the athletes, press, and spectators have gone home. Not every city to host the games since has learned this lesson, of course. But Los Angeles became a model for cities like Barcelona (1992) and Atlanta (1996), which orchestrated both successful games and positive development which revitalized their urban cores, and not at the expense of residents. Although other Olympic cities have been profitable, it remains the most financially successful Olympic games—by far.

L.A. also helped make the Olympics something for a city to be proud of again. Striking, innovative design that captured the imagination of both its residents and a global audience made the city feel visually united. Los Angeles itself was made smaller by the experience, seeing itself not just as a city but as a region, with far-flung communities that for the first time felt like they were part of this growing swell of Southern California pride. If it could happen in L.A., it could happen anywhere.

The first gold medal to be awarded at the Los Angeles Olympics was also the first-ever medal to be won by an athlete from China when Xu Haifeng won the 50 m Pistol event. Archer Neroli Fairhall from New Zealand was the first paraplegic Olympian at any Olympic Games, coming 35th in the Women's individual event. Synchronized swimming and rhythmic gymnastics debuted in Los Angeles as Olympic events, as did wind surfing.

Li Ning from the People's Republic of China won 6 medals in gymnastics, 3 gold, 2 silver, and 1 bronze, earning him the nickname "Prince of Gymnasts" in China. Li would later light the Olympic Cauldron at the 2008 Olympics. Steve Redgrave won his first title in rowing of the record five he would go on to win in five Olympic competitions. Victor Davis set a new world record in winning the gold medal in the 200-metre breaststroke in swimming. Mary Lou Retton became the first gymnast outside Eastern Europe to win the gymnastics all-around competition.

France won the Olympic football tournament, defeating Brazil 2–0 in the final. Olympic football was unexpectedly played before massive crowds throughout America, with several sell-outs at the 100,000+ seat Rose Bowl. This interest eventually led to the US hosting the 1994 FIFA World Cup. The Soviet-led boycott affected weightlifting more than any other sport: 94 of the world's top 100 ranked lifters were absent, as were 29 of the 30 medalists from the recent world championships. All 10 of the defending world champions in the 10 weight categories were absent.

Future Dream Team members Michael Jordan, Patrick Ewing, and Chris Mullin were on the team that won the gold medal in basketball. The 1984 US men's Olympic basketball team was coached by Indiana Hoosiers head coach Bobby Knight. Carl Lewis, making his first of four appearances at the Olympics, equaled the 1936 performance of Jesse Owens by winning four gold medals, in the 100 m, 200 m, 4x100 m relay and long jump.

Eighteen-year-old Zola Budd, a South African runner given British citizenship in order to dodge the apartheid-based ban on South African competitors, collided with home favourite Mary Decker-Slaney in the final of the 3000 m, causing the American to fall. With the crowd booing her for the rest of the race, Budd dropped back and finished well down the order. She was later cleared of wrongdoing and was also declared not culpable by Decker-Slaney. 

Carlos Lopes, from Portugal, won the Marathon with a time of 2:09:21, an Olympic record that stood for 24 years. It was the first gold medal ever for Portugal. Gold medal favourite, World Record holder and the then World Champion, Robert de Castella from Australia, finished in 5th place, 1:48 behind Lopes. Daley Thompson apparently missed a new world record in winning his second consecutive gold medal in the decathlon; the next year his score was retroactively raised to 8847, giving him the record.

Los Angeles is reportedly planning to bid for the 2024 games, which would make for a nice 40th anniversary celebration of its most shining moment.

#OlympicGames     #SummerOlympicGames
#80sMemories     #Olympics
#LosAngeles     #LA
#LA84     #Sports
#Onthisday     #SportEvent
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-ayJZd1I-6lw/Vbdkfgk649I/AAAAAAAAcoU/OPZyRkIIk7c/w506-h750/Los%2BAngeles%2B84.jpg
8 hours ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/104153292881404182920 Old School 4 Life : On this day: At 28th July of 1984, the 23rd Summer Olympic Games opened at the Los Angeles Coliseum ...
On this day:
At 28th July of 1984, the 23rd Summer Olympic Games opened at the Los Angeles Coliseum in Southern California. Peter V. Ueberroth, head of the U.S. Olympic Committee, welcomed 7,800 athletes from 140 nations during the 3-1/2 hour opening ceremonies.

In the late 1970s, hosting the Olympics was not a very desirable thing for a city to do. The games were seen as financially risky: Montreal's debt from the 1976 Summer Games totaled $1.5 billion dollars, which wasn't paid off until 2006. Denver was actually awarded the 1976 Winter Games but its voters did not approve public funding, so it went to Innsbruck, Austria. Plus, tensions were high when it came to international athletic competitions. Munich had suffered a deadly hostage crisis in 1972 and the Cold War was brewing. 

The 1980 games in Moscow were boycotted by the U.S. and other countries, and the U.S.S.R. and many other Eastern European boycotted the 1984 games. An early front-runner, Tehran, pulled out from the 1984 bidding process at the last minute due to social unrest. In the end, only two cities officially bid to host the 1984 Summer Games: New York City and Los Angeles. Since the U.S. could only recommend one city for the international bid, when they decided on L.A. to represent the U.S., it became the winning city by default.

The Olympics are essentially a high-profile opportunity for civic rebranding: A chance for a smaller city to put itself on the map or for a larger one to reinvent itself. While L.A. was by no means a tiny hamlet looking for validation, the city was certainly hoping to turn around its reputation as a smoggy, sprawling megalopolis lacking a center or any real civic pride. Detractors were quick to judge the choice of L.A. as too big, too unprepared, and too financially strapped. Plus, L.A. had already hosted the Summer Olympics once, back in 1932. But L.A. did have one real handicap: the 1984 Summer Olympics were the first in history not to be sponsored by the government, as they still are in many countries and had previously been in the U.S.

This called for a budget-conscious Olympics, headed by local businessman Peter Ueberroth. He organized a committee that functioned more like a corporation, dubbing it LA84 and creating a board consisting of entrepreneurs and other financially savvy leaders. Accordingly, the games would be funded by unprecedented corporate sponsorships, impressive private fundraising, and, for the first time on U.S. soil, television deals. The committee sold the television rights to the broadcast to ABC for $225 million, raising a large amount of money far in advance of the games. Leave it up to the entertainment capital of the world to strike such a smart deal.

L.A.'s fiscally responsible philosophy extended to its innovative architectural strategy. The building frenzy that accompanies a winning bid is often followed by a devastating post-Olympics blow, where the city is left with rotting stadiums and empty transit systems. This is most infamously illustrated in Athens, Greece; there, not only are most of the city's 2004 venues now empty and dilapidated, but it has been theorized that the egregious expenses may have actually contributed to Greece's ongoing financial crisis. Nagano, Japan, also fell into a recession after their 1998 Winter Olympics. Much of this is illustrated in The Olympic City, where Gary Hustwit and Jon Pack traveled to hosting cities to document what happens after the games leave.

Also, as we've seen in Sochi—which is building entire towns, not to mention a whole new highway and tunnel to access them—the infrastructural additions are often so ambitious that they aren't ready in time. Olympic cities rarely are. In Montreal in 1976, their Olympic stadium was not finished when the games began due to construction issues and labor strikes. Not finished, meaning: It was supposed to have roof, and it didn't—for 11 years.

Los Angeles's committee decided it would not allow any new sporting structures to be built. Instead they modified and upgraded existing venues. The opening ceremonies and track and field events were held in the Coliseum, which was built in 1932. Apartment villages for visiting athletes were repurposed as dorm rooms for nearby schools. The only new sporting venues were heavily financed by corporate sponsors and are still in use today.

Back then, committees only had about five years from the awarding of the games to the opening ceremonies—today's host cities get almost ten years of strategizing. A design team was quickly assembled that included leadership from two prominent design firms, Jerde Partnership and Sussman/Prejza, as well as many other firms and designers, who worked together at a studio on 8th Street in downtown Los Angeles. L.A. graphic artist Robert Miles Runyan was tapped to create the ''Stars in Motion'' logo: five stars which looked as if they were racing forward.

Faced with a minuscule budget of $10 million and a ticking clock, the designers quickly realized they would have to use materials which were affordable and plentiful to design thousands of pieces from programs to signage to temporary buildings. Inspired by the Pacific Rim, the team looked at the temporary tents and altars which were built for festivals.

Instead of hulking sculptures and tall towers which had been erected in many other cities, the team used inflatables and modified scaffolding to build simple, colorful landmarks. Signage and wayfinding was made from painted wood and Sonotubes—pretty much giant cardboard tubes like you'd find in the center of a roll of gift wrap— with a vinyl striping system. The structures were effective, inexpensive, and completely ephemeral.

As part of the lucrative TV deal that helped finance the games, LA84 would be the first games to truly become a global television event. Although many games had parts televised in some form before 1984, this broadcast would run 180 hours and be seen by the largest audience in history, not to mention very enthusiastic American fans. Knowing this, the designers focused on elements that would translate well on the small screen, with bright colors and big graphic impact. Tiny metal reflectors, like you see at car dealerships, were employed to add sparkle to buildings.

Design also helped to make Southern California's 88 cities and multiple counties, many with their own identities—feel like they were part of the same small town. With 42 venues sprinkled throughout a 305 square-mile region, some venues were 100 miles away from each other!—there was no real sense of continuity between locations (except maybe the presence of palm trees ?). The branding, which was repeated in elements across the landscape, helped to knit together an incredibly large area and create an identifiable sense of place. To global audience watching from home, this was, and will always be, L.A.

But the world was also watching for another reason: to see if L.A.'s famously suburban landscape could handle it. It was by far the most spatially dispersed summer games of all time. Residents fretted about L.A.'s normally horrible traffic becoming paralyzing. But the apocalyptic gridlock never happened. "Olympic fever" took hold. People stayed home, carpooled and used shuttles, and the city was miraculously navigable.

In 1979, the L.A. organizing committee had made a deal. If the games saw any profits, LA84 would give 60 percent back to the U.S. Olympic Committee and keep 40 percent for Southern California. At the end of the games, the total expenditures came in at a respectable $546 million, but even more impressive was the profit: A surplus of $232.5 million, meaning $93 million would stay in the region. This was huge. The only other games at the time which could claim to be financially successful at all were the other L.A. Olympics: The ones held in the city in 1932.

The profits were used to create an endowment called the LA84 Foundation, which funds youth sporting events, resources, and facilities throughout the area. With smart management, the endowment has grown over the years, and over $214 million has helped an estimated three million children and 1,100 organizations in Southern California. Recently, the LA84 Foundation helped raise money to pay coaches and buy equipment at LAUSD high schools after budget cuts decimated their programs.

What Los Angeles was able to do was bring some foresight to the hosting of the games by looking at what will be left for the city after the athletes, press, and spectators have gone home. Not every city to host the games since has learned this lesson, of course. But Los Angeles became a model for cities like Barcelona (1992) and Atlanta (1996), which orchestrated both successful games and positive development which revitalized their urban cores, and not at the expense of residents. Although other Olympic cities have been profitable, it remains the most financially successful Olympic games—by far.

L.A. also helped make the Olympics something for a city to be proud of again. Striking, innovative design that captured the imagination of both its residents and a global audience made the city feel visually united. Los Angeles itself was made smaller by the experience, seeing itself not just as a city but as a region, with far-flung communities that for the first time felt like they were part of this growing swell of Southern California pride. If it could happen in L.A., it could happen anywhere.

The first gold medal to be awarded at the Los Angeles Olympics was also the first-ever medal to be won by an athlete from China when Xu Haifeng won the 50 m Pistol event. Archer Neroli Fairhall from New Zealand was the first paraplegic Olympian at any Olympic Games, coming 35th in the Women's individual event. Synchronized swimming and rhythmic gymnastics debuted in Los Angeles as Olympic events, as did wind surfing.

Li Ning from the People's Republic of China won 6 medals in gymnastics, 3 gold, 2 silver, and 1 bronze, earning him the nickname "Prince of Gymnasts" in China. Li would later light the Olympic Cauldron at the 2008 Olympics. Steve Redgrave won his first title in rowing of the record five he would go on to win in five Olympic competitions. Victor Davis set a new world record in winning the gold medal in the 200-metre breaststroke in swimming. Mary Lou Retton became the first gymnast outside Eastern Europe to win the gymnastics all-around competition.

France won the Olympic football tournament, defeating Brazil 2–0 in the final. Olympic football was unexpectedly played before massive crowds throughout America, with several sell-outs at the 100,000+ seat Rose Bowl. This interest eventually led to the US hosting the 1994 FIFA World Cup. The Soviet-led boycott affected weightlifting more than any other sport: 94 of the world's top 100 ranked lifters were absent, as were 29 of the 30 medalists from the recent world championships. All 10 of the defending world champions in the 10 weight categories were absent.

Future Dream Team members Michael Jordan, Patrick Ewing, and Chris Mullin were on the team that won the gold medal in basketball. The 1984 US men's Olympic basketball team was coached by Indiana Hoosiers head coach Bobby Knight. Carl Lewis, making his first of four appearances at the Olympics, equaled the 1936 performance of Jesse Owens by winning four gold medals, in the 100 m, 200 m, 4x100 m relay and long jump.

Eighteen-year-old Zola Budd, a South African runner given British citizenship in order to dodge the apartheid-based ban on South African competitors, collided with home favourite Mary Decker-Slaney in the final of the 3000 m, causing the American to fall. With the crowd booing her for the rest of the race, Budd dropped back and finished well down the order. She was later cleared of wrongdoing and was also declared not culpable by Decker-Slaney. 

Carlos Lopes, from Portugal, won the Marathon with a time of 2:09:21, an Olympic record that stood for 24 years. It was the first gold medal ever for Portugal. Gold medal favourite, World Record holder and the then World Champion, Robert de Castella from Australia, finished in 5th place, 1:48 behind Lopes. Daley Thompson apparently missed a new world record in winning his second consecutive gold medal in the decathlon; the next year his score was retroactively raised to 8847, giving him the record.

Los Angeles is reportedly planning to bid for the 2024 games, which would make for a nice 40th anniversary celebration of its most shining moment.

#OlympicGames     #SummerOlympicGames
#80sMemories     #Olympics
#LosAngeles     #LA
#LA84     #Sports
#Onthisday     #SportEvent
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-ayJZd1I-6lw/Vbdkfgk649I/AAAAAAAAcoU/OPZyRkIIk7c/w506-h750/Los%2BAngeles%2B84.jpg
8 hours ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/114269910958751331764 Mr Jay Jay : On June 8, 1967, 34 American servicemen were killed and 174 were wounded during an Israeli attack on...
On June 8, 1967, 34 American servicemen were killed and 174 were wounded during an Israeli attack on the USS Liberty. According to former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Thomas Moorer, “Those men were then betrayed and left to die by our own government.” The survivors are still awaiting justice.

Rest In Peace

LT James Cecil Pierce, USN, 649805/6462
Born 11 July 1924, Clinton, North Carolina
Active duty since 6 August 1941
Wife: Pauline M. Pierce, Virginia Beach (died later)
Parents: deceased
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
while destroying registered publications
Wife: died soon after.
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, grave 8576R, Section 13

Jerry Leroy Converse, June 11, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Jerry Leroy Converse, USN, 794 79 44
Born 11 June 1943, Puyallup, Washington
Active duty since 1 February 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Melvin Ray Converse, Iowa
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Oak Hill Cemetery, Cherokee, Iowa, Plot Blk 2N, Lot 15, grave 4

Thomas Ray Thornton, February 1, 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Thomas Ray Thornton, USN, 997 97 91
Born 1 Febuary 1944, Springfield, Ohio
Active duty since 27 July 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Ray Thornton, Springfield, Ohio
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
- body recovered later
Buried: Ferncliff Cemetery, Springfield, Ohio.

Francis Brown, May 6, 1947 - June 8, 1967
QM3 Francis Brown, USN, 778 76 70
Born 6 May 1947, Albany, New York
Active duty since 6 August 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wade Brown, Troy, NY
Died on bridge while operating the helm

James Lee Lenau, January 9, 1947 - June 8, 1967
CTSN James Lee Lenau, USN, 997 56 58
Born 9 January 1947, Washington, Missouri
Active duty since 24 September 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Leander J. Lenau, Union, MO
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
in forward typewriter repair shop

Curtis Alan Graves, February 10, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT1 Curtis Alan Graves, USN, 519 58 24
Born 10 February 1943, Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan
Active duty since 22 August 1961
Mother: Florence McCullum Graves, Ft. Lauderdale, FL
Father: deceased
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #3773, Section 67
Remembrance: Memorial display planned for Military and Space Museum,
Frankenmuth, Michigan (dedication summer 1990).
Remembrance: Graves Hall (barracks) in Pensacola, Florida.

PC2 John Clarence Spicher, USN, 473 41 77
Born 15 Febuary 1937, Terentum, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 23 September 1954
Wife: Linda Lee Spicher
7901 Hampton Blvd., Norfolk, Virginia
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John E. Spicher, Brackenridge, PA
Hit with rocket on main deck, died receiving emergency aid
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #11362D, Section 13

John Spicher, February 15, 1937 - June 8, 1967
PC2 John Clarence Spicher, USN, 473 41 77
Born 15 Febuary 1937, Terentum, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 23 September 1954
Wife: Linda Lee Spicher
7901 Hampton Blvd., Norfolk, Virginia
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John E. Spicher, Brackenridge, PA
Hit with rocket on main deck, died receiving emergency aid
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #11362D, Section 13

Philippe Charles Tiedtke, 17 October 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Philippe Charles Tiedtke, USN, 914 32 84
Born 17 October 1944, Santa Cruz, California
Active duty since 2 September 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Arthur L. Tiedtke, Modesto, CA
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Lakewood Memorial Park, Hughson, CA

Robert Burton Eisenberg, 12 October 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Robert Burton Eisenberg, USN, 776 09 35
Born 12 October 1944, St. Paul, Minnesota
Active duty since 3 February 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Benj. Eisenberg, St. Paul, MN
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Duane Marggraf, January 27, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Duane Rowe Marggraf, USN, 773 96 50
Born 27 January 1945, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin
Active duty since 6 July 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Carlton H. Marggraf, Fond du Lac, WI
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Remembrance: Brass Marker initially installed at Lakeside Park,
Fon du Lac, in the 1980s, later vanished to storage in the basement
of a city building. Following protests from local citizens, it was
placed on a wall in the Fon du Lac Court House.

John Caleb Smith, July 13, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT1 John Caleb Smith, Jr., USN, 237 77 94
Born 13 July 1943, Ithaca, New York
Active duty since 30 June 1961
Wife: Sandra Ann Smith, 203 Wood Street, Ithica, NY
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John Caleb Smith, Sr., Ithica, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Jack Lewis Raper, August 28, 1944 - June 8, 1967
SGT Jack Lewis Raper, USMC, 1994072
Born 28 August 1944, Cedartown, Georgia
Active duty since 1 August 1962
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

Philip McCutcheon Armstrong July 4, 1929 - June 8, 1967

LCDR Philip McCutcheon Armstrong, Jr., USN, 569825/1100
Born 4 July 1929, Detroit, Michigan
Active duty since 5 June 1953
US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Class of 1953
Wife: Marie Kearney "Weetie" Armstrong, Virginia Beach, VA
Father: Philip M.C. Armstrong, Detroit, Michigan
Mortally wounded near the bridge attempting to extinguish large fire
Died about 4 hours later in battle dressing station
Received Navy Cross for heroism during battle
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery grave 2096X, Section 3
His wife died in 1988 of cancer.
Remembrance: Memorial display: Hall of Heroes, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland
Memorial display: Military and Space Museum,
Frankenmuth, Michigan, dedicated November, 1990, contains
his Navy Cross, uniform, story of attack, copy of Ennes' book.

Lawrence P. Hayden, June 16, 1947 - June 8, 1967
CTSN Lawrence Paul Hayden, USN, B70 53 70
Born 16 June 1947, Houston, Texas
Active duty since 2 May 1966
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. James H. Hayden, Houston, Texas
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

David Skolak, August 12, 1946 - June 8, 1967
ICFN David NMN Skolak, USN, B50 17 83
Born 12 August 1946, Gary, Indiana
Active duty since 24 January 1966
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Rudolph J. Skolak, Gary, Indiana
Died in forward gun mount returning fire

Richard W. Keene, October 23, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Richard Walter Keene, Jr., USN, 778 82 75
Born 23 October 1945, Batavia, New York
Active duty since 10 November 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Richard W. Keene, Sr., Poughkeepsie, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Carl C. Nygren, May 17, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CTSN Carl Christian Nygren, USN, 788 37 16
Born 17 May 1945, Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 19 August 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Arvid C. Nygren, North Babylon, LI, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

Frederick James Walton, November 28, 1935 - June 8, 1967
CT1 Frederick James Walton, USN, 236 31 86
Born 28 November 1935, Niagara Falls, New York
Active duty since 8 December 1952
Wife: Audry Jane Walton, #3 Deuro Drive, Niagara Falls, NY
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Horace F. Walton, Niagara Falls, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Edward Emory Rehmeyer III, September 25, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CPL Edward Emory Rehmeyer, III, USMC 2120919
Born 25 September 1945, York, Pennsylvania
Parents address 10/93: Mr. & Mrs. Ed Rehmeyer, Jr., Shrewsbury, PA 17361
Active duty since 8 October 1964
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Ronnie Jordon Campbell, November 4, 1942 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Ronnie Jordon Campbell, USN, 586 13 23
Born 4 November 1942, Sevierville, Tennessee
Active duty since 6 September 1961
Wife: Elizabeth E. Campbell
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Raymond C. Campbell, Sevierville, Tennessee
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave 1145C, Section 13
Remembrance: Ronnie Campbell Barracks in Edzell, Scotland

Alan Higgins, January 27, 1948 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Alan (NMN) Higgins, USN, 788 62 97
Born 27 January 1948, Weymouth, Massachusetts
Active duty since 16 September 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wilbur C. Higgins, Dover, Delaware
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #1773, Section 12

Alexander Neil Thompson, Jr., April 5, 1943 - June 8, 1967
GMG3 Alexander Neil Thompson, Jr., USN, 770 47 21
Born 5 April 1943, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 5 September 1963
Wife: Gail E. Thompson, 4 Crystal Drive, Warwick, Rhode Island
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Alexander A. Thompson, Greely, Pennsylvania
Died in forward gun mount
Remembrance: Navy gunnery training building for the Aegis system
named in his memory in 1990.

Jerry Lee Goss, Jr., May 30, 1941 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Jerry Lee Goss, USNR, 773 61 55
Born 30 May 1941, North Vernon, Indiana
Active duty since 29 June 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Harry Herschel Goss, North Vernon, IN
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

James Mahlon Lupton, October 29, 1942 - June 8, 1967
CT1 James Mahlon Lupton, USN, 511 31 28
Born 20 October 1942, Shreveport, Louisiana
Active duty since 26 June 1962
Wife: Barbara Joan Lupton, 25E Sobria Loka, Yalova, Turkey
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Clyde Knot Lupton, Shreveport, LA
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

William Bernard Allenbaugh, January 23, 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT3 William Bernard Allenbaugh, USN, 684 49 96
Born 23 January 1944, Baltimore, Maryland
Active duty since 10 June 1964
Wife: Sandra Lee Allenbaugh, Lothian, Maryland
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Francis Allenbaugh, Baltimore, Maryland
Memorial: Mr. & Mrs. Allenbaugh presented a memorial plaque to
Calvert Hall College, a catholic high school attended by Wm. Allenbaugh,
in his memory.

Untitled Poem - By William B. Allenbaugh, Jr.
This is dedicated to my father, William Bernard Allenbaugh, Sr. killed on the USS LIBERTY, 8 June 1967

Fathers work,
To earn their pay,
To raise their families,
Day by Day.

Fathers console their children,
When they are sad,
They punish their children
When they are bad.

Some families don't have Fathers,
They are killed or die,
Some are in prison,
Others run away and cry.

But without Fathers,
Where would we be,
Probably swimming out farther,
Then drowning, helplessly at sea.

Warren Edward Hersey, October 14, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT1 Warren Edward Hersey, USN, 903 67 11
Born 14 October 1943, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 4 April 1961
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Warren O. Hersey, Stoneham, Mass.
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Raymond Eugene Linn, June 30, 1928 - June 8, 1967
CTC Raymond Eugene Linn, USN, 571 13 74
Born 30 June 1928, Adamsville, Ohio
Active duty since 25 September 1946
Divorced
Adopted Daughter: Linda Loucille Linn, Zanesville, Ohio
Daughter: Joy (Mrs. Larry R.) Linn Evans, Aurora, Ohio 44202
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #1724, Section 12
Remembrance: Linn Barracks in Japan
Linn Operations Building in Sugar Grove, West Virginia

Gary Ray Blanchard, September 16, 1946 - June 8, 1967
SN Gary Ray Blanchard, USN, 771 77 22
Born 16 September 1946, Wichita, Kansas
Active duty since 11 February 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Earl T. Blanchard, Wichita, Kansas
Died on operating table 0315 June 9, 1967
Buried: Lakeview Cemetery and Mausoleum, Wichita, Kansas

Anthony Peter Mendle, December, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Anthony Peter Mendle, USN, 777 62 87
Born 4 December 1945, Waterbury, Connecticut
Active duty since 11 August 1964 or 1965 (dates conflict)
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John J. Mendle, Glendale, Arizona
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Resthaven Park Cemetary (West), Glendale AZ

David W. Marlborough, September 28, 1948 - June 8, 1967
CTSN David Walter Marlborough, USN, B10 04 80
Born 28 September 1948, Waterville, Maine
Active duty since 26 July 1966
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wm. M. Marlborough, Springfield, Mass.
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

Carl Lewis Hoar, May 29, 1945 - June 8, 1967
SN Carl Lewis Hoar, USN, 774 46 48
(Shown as Carl Lewis Hoar on list sent for Navy Memorial)
(Shown as Carl Louis Hoar on official 1967 final casualty list)
Born 29 May 1945, Mount Vernon, Ohio
Active duty since 29 November 1963
Parents: Mr. and Mrs. James B. Hoar, Mt. Vernon, Ohio
Buried: Mt. Vernon, Ohio

Allen Merle Blue, September 5, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Allen Merle Blue, USNR-R, 391 18 71
Born 5 September 1943, Yakima, Washington
Active duty USN from 22 SEP 61 to 21 JAN 66
Serving as a civilian for NSA
Parents: Washington State
Wife: Patricia Baccus Blue
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave 745, Section 48

Stephen Spencer Toth, September 12, 1939 - June 8, 1967
LT Stephen Spencer Toth, USN, 669613/1100
Born 12 September 1939, San Diego, California
Active duty since 5 June 1963
US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Class of 1963
Wife: Regina Chermont Toth, US Mission to Brazil
Avenida Morambi 3819, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Parents: Capt. & Mrs. Joseph C. Toth, USN, Virginia Beach, VA
Father: deceased - died about 1968.
Died 01 or 02 level, port side, of rocket fire
Received Silver Star for heroism during battle
Memorial display, Hall of Heroes, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland
Buried: U. S. Naval Academy Cemetery, Annapolis, Maryland

Melvin Douglas Smith, February 27, 1938 - June 8, 1967
CTC Melvin Douglas Smith, USN, 493 95 96
Born 27 February 1938, Alamance, North Carolina
Active duty since 4 April 1956
Wife: Judith Ann Smith, 304 Moreno Courts, Warrington, Florida
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Carlton Melvin Smith, Alamance, North Carolina
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Remembrance: Smith Barracks in Florida

In May of 1966 Doug received an assignment to sea duty, and he boarded the USS Liberty on May 31, 1966. The family had moved back to North Carolina, and another son, Tim, was born there. The Liberty docked on February 28, 1967, and Doug rushed home to see his youngest son for the first time.

Doug's death on the Liberty continues to shiver through the lives of those who loved him. His oldest son, Douglas, recently wrote a poem for his father, "Epitaph at Sea with Constellation Above." In the poem, his father disappears, line by line, from the world:

Mariner, descend, and the sea conceal
bird and sky and the drowned father below,
who shall not sing, who shall not rise, but dwells
among the abandoned gods, a body
unfolding dark, restless and fathoms deep.
____________________________________________________________________
Join the memorial service for the USS Liberty victims on June 8, 2013 at noon at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery.
Please call for an investigation to help bring closure to the sailors and their families who have suffered and felt betrayed by their country for 45 years.

Please read some of the articles about the USS Liberty published by the Washington Reportover the past 30 years. On Jan. 12, 2004 the U.S. State Department held a highly charged panel discussion on the attack, and prevented survivors and military experts who played a role in the tragedy from speaking (see Washington Report, March 2004, pages 9-11,http://www.wrmea.org/archives/259-washington-report-archives-2000-2005/march-2004/5019-those-not-invited-to-speak-steal-the-show-at-state-department-liberty-discussion.html.
It’s past time for a serious discussion with USS Liberty survivors and other experts. It is the least these unsung heroes—and all Americans—deserve.
https://www.facebook.com/events/186293598165055/
____________________________________________________________________

A former Navy attorney who helped lead the military investigation of the 1967 Israeli attack on the USS Liberty that killed 34 American servicemen says former President Lyndon Johnson and his defense secretary, Robert McNamara, ordered that the inquiry conclude the incident was an accident.

In a signed affidavit released at a Capitol Hill news conference, retired Capt. Ward Boston said Johnson and McNamara told those heading the Navy's inquiry to "conclude that the attack was a case of 'mistaken identity' despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary."

It was “one of the classic all-American cover-ups,” said retired Admiral Thomas Moorer, a former Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman who spent a year investigating the attack as part of an independent panel he formed with other former military officials. The panel also included a former US ambassador to Saudi Arabia, James Akins.

Torpedo hole in USS Liberty

“Why would our government put Israel’s interests ahead of our own?” Moorer asked from his wheelchair at the news conference. He was chief of naval operations at the time of the attack.

Moorer, who has long held that the attack was a deliberate act, wants Congress to investigate. [Newsday]

Israel claims the USS Liberty was mistaken for the out-of-service Egyptian horse carrier El Quseir. Giddy up!

Fifteen years after the attack, an Israeli pilot approached Liberty survivors and then held extensive interviews with former Congressman Paul N. (Pete) McCloskey about his role. According to this senior Israeli lead pilot, he recognized the Liberty as American immediately, so informed his headquarters, and was told to ignore the American flag and continue his attack. He refused to do so and returned to base, where he was arrested.

Later, a dual-citizen Israeli major told survivors that he was in an Israeli war room where he heard that pilot's radio report. The attacking pilots and everyone in the Israeli war room knew that they were attacking an American ship, the major said. He recanted the statement only after he received threatening phone calls from Israel.

The pilot's protests also were heard by radio monitors in the U.S. Embassy in Lebanon. Then-U.S. Ambassador to Lebanon Dwight Porter has confirmed this. Porter told his story to syndicated columnists Rowland Evans and Robert Novak and offered to submit to further questioning by authorities. Unfortunately, no one in the U.S. government has any interest in hearing these first-person accounts of Israeli treachery. [Washington Report]

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Then, inexplicably, at 2 p.m., unmarked Israeli aircraft began attacking the ship." [Ledger Enquirer]

Israel attacked the USS Liberty using UNMARKED AIRCRAFT. This is the single fact which proves Israel knew exactly who they were attacking. Israel's story is that they thought USS Liberty was an Egyptian ship and therefore a legitimate target of war. Were that true, there would be no reason to attack a supposedly Egyptian ship with unmarked aircraft. The only possible reason to use unmarked aircraft to attack the ship is that Israel knew it was an American ship and intended to sink it, then to blame the attack on Egypt.

Moorer, who as top legal council to the official investigation is in a position to know, agrees that Israel intended to sink the USS Liberty and blame Egypt for it, thus dragging the United States into a war on Israel's behalf. This seems to be a common trick of Israel. Starting with the Lavon affair, through the USS Liberty, to the fake radio transmitter that tricked Reagan into attacking Libya, to potentially 9-11 itself, Israel's game is to frame Arabs and set them up as targets for the United States.

The official US investigation is discredited. And with it, every claim of innocence for Israel that relied on the official investigation as a source.

The real question facing the American people is why the US Government seems more concerned with protecting Israel after they are caught playing these dirty tricks, rather than doing something to convince Israel not to kill any more Americans.

"Evidence linking these Israelis to 9/11 is classified. I cannot tell you about evidence that has been gathered. It's classified information." -- US official quoted in Carl Cameron's Fox News report on the Israeli spy ring and its connections to 9-11.

Dead In The Water - The Sinking of the USS Liberty
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iy2gkkp8Cl8

USS Liberty Cover Up - Full Movie- The Loss Of Liberty
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFQrsdj7BLs
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-LITjLrjbEU0/VKBRhor_KiI/AAAAAAAE1FQ/LVeHnyARW0k/w506-h750/1511077_10154172416050005_2522448360988742617_n.jpg
2 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/111809803781927815801 König Thomas : On June 8, 1967, 34 American servicemen were killed and 174 were wounded during an Israeli attack on...
On June 8, 1967, 34 American servicemen were killed and 174 were wounded during an Israeli attack on the USS Liberty. According to former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Thomas Moorer, “Those men were then betrayed and left to die by our own government.” The survivors are still awaiting justice.

Rest In Peace

LT James Cecil Pierce, USN, 649805/6462
Born 11 July 1924, Clinton, North Carolina
Active duty since 6 August 1941
Wife: Pauline M. Pierce, Virginia Beach (died later)
Parents: deceased
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
while destroying registered publications
Wife: died soon after.
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, grave 8576R, Section 13

Jerry Leroy Converse, June 11, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Jerry Leroy Converse, USN, 794 79 44
Born 11 June 1943, Puyallup, Washington
Active duty since 1 February 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Melvin Ray Converse, Iowa
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Oak Hill Cemetery, Cherokee, Iowa, Plot Blk 2N, Lot 15, grave 4

Thomas Ray Thornton, February 1, 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Thomas Ray Thornton, USN, 997 97 91
Born 1 Febuary 1944, Springfield, Ohio
Active duty since 27 July 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Ray Thornton, Springfield, Ohio
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
- body recovered later
Buried: Ferncliff Cemetery, Springfield, Ohio.

Francis Brown, May 6, 1947 - June 8, 1967
QM3 Francis Brown, USN, 778 76 70
Born 6 May 1947, Albany, New York
Active duty since 6 August 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wade Brown, Troy, NY
Died on bridge while operating the helm

James Lee Lenau, January 9, 1947 - June 8, 1967
CTSN James Lee Lenau, USN, 997 56 58
Born 9 January 1947, Washington, Missouri
Active duty since 24 September 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Leander J. Lenau, Union, MO
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
in forward typewriter repair shop

Curtis Alan Graves, February 10, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT1 Curtis Alan Graves, USN, 519 58 24
Born 10 February 1943, Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan
Active duty since 22 August 1961
Mother: Florence McCullum Graves, Ft. Lauderdale, FL
Father: deceased
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #3773, Section 67
Remembrance: Memorial display planned for Military and Space Museum,
Frankenmuth, Michigan (dedication summer 1990).
Remembrance: Graves Hall (barracks) in Pensacola, Florida.

PC2 John Clarence Spicher, USN, 473 41 77
Born 15 Febuary 1937, Terentum, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 23 September 1954
Wife: Linda Lee Spicher
7901 Hampton Blvd., Norfolk, Virginia
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John E. Spicher, Brackenridge, PA
Hit with rocket on main deck, died receiving emergency aid
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #11362D, Section 13

John Spicher, February 15, 1937 - June 8, 1967
PC2 John Clarence Spicher, USN, 473 41 77
Born 15 Febuary 1937, Terentum, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 23 September 1954
Wife: Linda Lee Spicher
7901 Hampton Blvd., Norfolk, Virginia
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John E. Spicher, Brackenridge, PA
Hit with rocket on main deck, died receiving emergency aid
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #11362D, Section 13

Philippe Charles Tiedtke, 17 October 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Philippe Charles Tiedtke, USN, 914 32 84
Born 17 October 1944, Santa Cruz, California
Active duty since 2 September 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Arthur L. Tiedtke, Modesto, CA
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Lakewood Memorial Park, Hughson, CA

Robert Burton Eisenberg, 12 October 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Robert Burton Eisenberg, USN, 776 09 35
Born 12 October 1944, St. Paul, Minnesota
Active duty since 3 February 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Benj. Eisenberg, St. Paul, MN
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Duane Marggraf, January 27, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Duane Rowe Marggraf, USN, 773 96 50
Born 27 January 1945, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin
Active duty since 6 July 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Carlton H. Marggraf, Fond du Lac, WI
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Remembrance: Brass Marker initially installed at Lakeside Park,
Fon du Lac, in the 1980s, later vanished to storage in the basement
of a city building. Following protests from local citizens, it was
placed on a wall in the Fon du Lac Court House.

John Caleb Smith, July 13, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT1 John Caleb Smith, Jr., USN, 237 77 94
Born 13 July 1943, Ithaca, New York
Active duty since 30 June 1961
Wife: Sandra Ann Smith, 203 Wood Street, Ithica, NY
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John Caleb Smith, Sr., Ithica, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Jack Lewis Raper, August 28, 1944 - June 8, 1967
SGT Jack Lewis Raper, USMC, 1994072
Born 28 August 1944, Cedartown, Georgia
Active duty since 1 August 1962
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

Philip McCutcheon Armstrong July 4, 1929 - June 8, 1967

LCDR Philip McCutcheon Armstrong, Jr., USN, 569825/1100
Born 4 July 1929, Detroit, Michigan
Active duty since 5 June 1953
US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Class of 1953
Wife: Marie Kearney "Weetie" Armstrong, Virginia Beach, VA
Father: Philip M.C. Armstrong, Detroit, Michigan
Mortally wounded near the bridge attempting to extinguish large fire
Died about 4 hours later in battle dressing station
Received Navy Cross for heroism during battle
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery grave 2096X, Section 3
His wife died in 1988 of cancer.
Remembrance: Memorial display: Hall of Heroes, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland
Memorial display: Military and Space Museum,
Frankenmuth, Michigan, dedicated November, 1990, contains
his Navy Cross, uniform, story of attack, copy of Ennes' book.

Lawrence P. Hayden, June 16, 1947 - June 8, 1967
CTSN Lawrence Paul Hayden, USN, B70 53 70
Born 16 June 1947, Houston, Texas
Active duty since 2 May 1966
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. James H. Hayden, Houston, Texas
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

David Skolak, August 12, 1946 - June 8, 1967
ICFN David NMN Skolak, USN, B50 17 83
Born 12 August 1946, Gary, Indiana
Active duty since 24 January 1966
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Rudolph J. Skolak, Gary, Indiana
Died in forward gun mount returning fire

Richard W. Keene, October 23, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Richard Walter Keene, Jr., USN, 778 82 75
Born 23 October 1945, Batavia, New York
Active duty since 10 November 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Richard W. Keene, Sr., Poughkeepsie, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Carl C. Nygren, May 17, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CTSN Carl Christian Nygren, USN, 788 37 16
Born 17 May 1945, Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 19 August 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Arvid C. Nygren, North Babylon, LI, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

Frederick James Walton, November 28, 1935 - June 8, 1967
CT1 Frederick James Walton, USN, 236 31 86
Born 28 November 1935, Niagara Falls, New York
Active duty since 8 December 1952
Wife: Audry Jane Walton, #3 Deuro Drive, Niagara Falls, NY
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Horace F. Walton, Niagara Falls, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Edward Emory Rehmeyer III, September 25, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CPL Edward Emory Rehmeyer, III, USMC 2120919
Born 25 September 1945, York, Pennsylvania
Parents address 10/93: Mr. & Mrs. Ed Rehmeyer, Jr., Shrewsbury, PA 17361
Active duty since 8 October 1964
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Ronnie Jordon Campbell, November 4, 1942 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Ronnie Jordon Campbell, USN, 586 13 23
Born 4 November 1942, Sevierville, Tennessee
Active duty since 6 September 1961
Wife: Elizabeth E. Campbell
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Raymond C. Campbell, Sevierville, Tennessee
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave 1145C, Section 13
Remembrance: Ronnie Campbell Barracks in Edzell, Scotland

Alan Higgins, January 27, 1948 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Alan (NMN) Higgins, USN, 788 62 97
Born 27 January 1948, Weymouth, Massachusetts
Active duty since 16 September 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wilbur C. Higgins, Dover, Delaware
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #1773, Section 12

Alexander Neil Thompson, Jr., April 5, 1943 - June 8, 1967
GMG3 Alexander Neil Thompson, Jr., USN, 770 47 21
Born 5 April 1943, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 5 September 1963
Wife: Gail E. Thompson, 4 Crystal Drive, Warwick, Rhode Island
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Alexander A. Thompson, Greely, Pennsylvania
Died in forward gun mount
Remembrance: Navy gunnery training building for the Aegis system
named in his memory in 1990.

Jerry Lee Goss, Jr., May 30, 1941 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Jerry Lee Goss, USNR, 773 61 55
Born 30 May 1941, North Vernon, Indiana
Active duty since 29 June 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Harry Herschel Goss, North Vernon, IN
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

James Mahlon Lupton, October 29, 1942 - June 8, 1967
CT1 James Mahlon Lupton, USN, 511 31 28
Born 20 October 1942, Shreveport, Louisiana
Active duty since 26 June 1962
Wife: Barbara Joan Lupton, 25E Sobria Loka, Yalova, Turkey
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Clyde Knot Lupton, Shreveport, LA
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

William Bernard Allenbaugh, January 23, 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT3 William Bernard Allenbaugh, USN, 684 49 96
Born 23 January 1944, Baltimore, Maryland
Active duty since 10 June 1964
Wife: Sandra Lee Allenbaugh, Lothian, Maryland
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Francis Allenbaugh, Baltimore, Maryland
Memorial: Mr. & Mrs. Allenbaugh presented a memorial plaque to
Calvert Hall College, a catholic high school attended by Wm. Allenbaugh,
in his memory.

Untitled Poem - By William B. Allenbaugh, Jr.
This is dedicated to my father, William Bernard Allenbaugh, Sr. killed on the USS LIBERTY, 8 June 1967

Fathers work,
To earn their pay,
To raise their families,
Day by Day.

Fathers console their children,
When they are sad,
They punish their children
When they are bad.

Some families don't have Fathers,
They are killed or die,
Some are in prison,
Others run away and cry.

But without Fathers,
Where would we be,
Probably swimming out farther,
Then drowning, helplessly at sea.

Warren Edward Hersey, October 14, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT1 Warren Edward Hersey, USN, 903 67 11
Born 14 October 1943, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 4 April 1961
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Warren O. Hersey, Stoneham, Mass.
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Raymond Eugene Linn, June 30, 1928 - June 8, 1967
CTC Raymond Eugene Linn, USN, 571 13 74
Born 30 June 1928, Adamsville, Ohio
Active duty since 25 September 1946
Divorced
Adopted Daughter: Linda Loucille Linn, Zanesville, Ohio
Daughter: Joy (Mrs. Larry R.) Linn Evans, Aurora, Ohio 44202
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #1724, Section 12
Remembrance: Linn Barracks in Japan
Linn Operations Building in Sugar Grove, West Virginia

Gary Ray Blanchard, September 16, 1946 - June 8, 1967
SN Gary Ray Blanchard, USN, 771 77 22
Born 16 September 1946, Wichita, Kansas
Active duty since 11 February 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Earl T. Blanchard, Wichita, Kansas
Died on operating table 0315 June 9, 1967
Buried: Lakeview Cemetery and Mausoleum, Wichita, Kansas

Anthony Peter Mendle, December, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Anthony Peter Mendle, USN, 777 62 87
Born 4 December 1945, Waterbury, Connecticut
Active duty since 11 August 1964 or 1965 (dates conflict)
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John J. Mendle, Glendale, Arizona
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Resthaven Park Cemetary (West), Glendale AZ

David W. Marlborough, September 28, 1948 - June 8, 1967
CTSN David Walter Marlborough, USN, B10 04 80
Born 28 September 1948, Waterville, Maine
Active duty since 26 July 1966
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wm. M. Marlborough, Springfield, Mass.
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

Carl Lewis Hoar, May 29, 1945 - June 8, 1967
SN Carl Lewis Hoar, USN, 774 46 48
(Shown as Carl Lewis Hoar on list sent for Navy Memorial)
(Shown as Carl Louis Hoar on official 1967 final casualty list)
Born 29 May 1945, Mount Vernon, Ohio
Active duty since 29 November 1963
Parents: Mr. and Mrs. James B. Hoar, Mt. Vernon, Ohio
Buried: Mt. Vernon, Ohio

Allen Merle Blue, September 5, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Allen Merle Blue, USNR-R, 391 18 71
Born 5 September 1943, Yakima, Washington
Active duty USN from 22 SEP 61 to 21 JAN 66
Serving as a civilian for NSA
Parents: Washington State
Wife: Patricia Baccus Blue
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave 745, Section 48

Stephen Spencer Toth, September 12, 1939 - June 8, 1967
LT Stephen Spencer Toth, USN, 669613/1100
Born 12 September 1939, San Diego, California
Active duty since 5 June 1963
US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Class of 1963
Wife: Regina Chermont Toth, US Mission to Brazil
Avenida Morambi 3819, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Parents: Capt. & Mrs. Joseph C. Toth, USN, Virginia Beach, VA
Father: deceased - died about 1968.
Died 01 or 02 level, port side, of rocket fire
Received Silver Star for heroism during battle
Memorial display, Hall of Heroes, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland
Buried: U. S. Naval Academy Cemetery, Annapolis, Maryland

Melvin Douglas Smith, February 27, 1938 - June 8, 1967
CTC Melvin Douglas Smith, USN, 493 95 96
Born 27 February 1938, Alamance, North Carolina
Active duty since 4 April 1956
Wife: Judith Ann Smith, 304 Moreno Courts, Warrington, Florida
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Carlton Melvin Smith, Alamance, North Carolina
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Remembrance: Smith Barracks in Florida

In May of 1966 Doug received an assignment to sea duty, and he boarded the USS Liberty on May 31, 1966. The family had moved back to North Carolina, and another son, Tim, was born there. The Liberty docked on February 28, 1967, and Doug rushed home to see his youngest son for the first time.

Doug's death on the Liberty continues to shiver through the lives of those who loved him. His oldest son, Douglas, recently wrote a poem for his father, "Epitaph at Sea with Constellation Above." In the poem, his father disappears, line by line, from the world:

Mariner, descend, and the sea conceal
bird and sky and the drowned father below,
who shall not sing, who shall not rise, but dwells
among the abandoned gods, a body
unfolding dark, restless and fathoms deep.
____________________________________________________________________
Join the memorial service for the USS Liberty victims on June 8, 2013 at noon at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery.
Please call for an investigation to help bring closure to the sailors and their families who have suffered and felt betrayed by their country for 45 years.

Please read some of the articles about the USS Liberty published by the Washington Reportover the past 30 years. On Jan. 12, 2004 the U.S. State Department held a highly charged panel discussion on the attack, and prevented survivors and military experts who played a role in the tragedy from speaking (see Washington Report, March 2004, pages 9-11,http://www.wrmea.org/archives/259-washington-report-archives-2000-2005/march-2004/5019-those-not-invited-to-speak-steal-the-show-at-state-department-liberty-discussion.html.
It’s past time for a serious discussion with USS Liberty survivors and other experts. It is the least these unsung heroes—and all Americans—deserve.
https://www.facebook.com/events/186293598165055/
____________________________________________________________________

A former Navy attorney who helped lead the military investigation of the 1967 Israeli attack on the USS Liberty that killed 34 American servicemen says former President Lyndon Johnson and his defense secretary, Robert McNamara, ordered that the inquiry conclude the incident was an accident.

In a signed affidavit released at a Capitol Hill news conference, retired Capt. Ward Boston said Johnson and McNamara told those heading the Navy's inquiry to "conclude that the attack was a case of 'mistaken identity' despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary."

It was “one of the classic all-American cover-ups,” said retired Admiral Thomas Moorer, a former Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman who spent a year investigating the attack as part of an independent panel he formed with other former military officials. The panel also included a former US ambassador to Saudi Arabia, James Akins.

Torpedo hole in USS Liberty

“Why would our government put Israel’s interests ahead of our own?” Moorer asked from his wheelchair at the news conference. He was chief of naval operations at the time of the attack.

Moorer, who has long held that the attack was a deliberate act, wants Congress to investigate. [Newsday]

Israel claims the USS Liberty was mistaken for the out-of-service Egyptian horse carrier El Quseir. Giddy up!

Fifteen years after the attack, an Israeli pilot approached Liberty survivors and then held extensive interviews with former Congressman Paul N. (Pete) McCloskey about his role. According to this senior Israeli lead pilot, he recognized the Liberty as American immediately, so informed his headquarters, and was told to ignore the American flag and continue his attack. He refused to do so and returned to base, where he was arrested.

Later, a dual-citizen Israeli major told survivors that he was in an Israeli war room where he heard that pilot's radio report. The attacking pilots and everyone in the Israeli war room knew that they were attacking an American ship, the major said. He recanted the statement only after he received threatening phone calls from Israel.

The pilot's protests also were heard by radio monitors in the U.S. Embassy in Lebanon. Then-U.S. Ambassador to Lebanon Dwight Porter has confirmed this. Porter told his story to syndicated columnists Rowland Evans and Robert Novak and offered to submit to further questioning by authorities. Unfortunately, no one in the U.S. government has any interest in hearing these first-person accounts of Israeli treachery. [Washington Report]

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Then, inexplicably, at 2 p.m., unmarked Israeli aircraft began attacking the ship." [Ledger Enquirer]

Israel attacked the USS Liberty using UNMARKED AIRCRAFT. This is the single fact which proves Israel knew exactly who they were attacking. Israel's story is that they thought USS Liberty was an Egyptian ship and therefore a legitimate target of war. Were that true, there would be no reason to attack a supposedly Egyptian ship with unmarked aircraft. The only possible reason to use unmarked aircraft to attack the ship is that Israel knew it was an American ship and intended to sink it, then to blame the attack on Egypt.

Moorer, who as top legal council to the official investigation is in a position to know, agrees that Israel intended to sink the USS Liberty and blame Egypt for it, thus dragging the United States into a war on Israel's behalf. This seems to be a common trick of Israel. Starting with the Lavon affair, through the USS Liberty, to the fake radio transmitter that tricked Reagan into attacking Libya, to potentially 9-11 itself, Israel's game is to frame Arabs and set them up as targets for the United States.

The official US investigation is discredited. And with it, every claim of innocence for Israel that relied on the official investigation as a source.

The real question facing the American people is why the US Government seems more concerned with protecting Israel after they are caught playing these dirty tricks, rather than doing something to convince Israel not to kill any more Americans.

"Evidence linking these Israelis to 9/11 is classified. I cannot tell you about evidence that has been gathered. It's classified information." -- US official quoted in Carl Cameron's Fox News report on the Israeli spy ring and its connections to 9-11.

Dead In The Water - The Sinking of the USS Liberty
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iy2gkkp8Cl8

USS Liberty Cover Up - Full Movie- The Loss Of Liberty
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFQrsdj7BLs
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-LITjLrjbEU0/VKBRhor_KiI/AAAAAAAE1FQ/LVeHnyARW0k/w506-h750/1511077_10154172416050005_2522448360988742617_n.jpg
2 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/101817495009579781549 ARCHAIC SYMBOLISM : On June 8, 1967, 34 American servicemen were killed and 174 were wounded during an Israeli attack on...
On June 8, 1967, 34 American servicemen were killed and 174 were wounded during an Israeli attack on the USS Liberty. According to former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Thomas Moorer, “Those men were then betrayed and left to die by our own government.” The survivors are still awaiting justice.

Rest In Peace

LT James Cecil Pierce, USN, 649805/6462
Born 11 July 1924, Clinton, North Carolina
Active duty since 6 August 1941
Wife: Pauline M. Pierce, Virginia Beach (died later)
Parents: deceased
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
while destroying registered publications
Wife: died soon after.
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, grave 8576R, Section 13

Jerry Leroy Converse, June 11, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Jerry Leroy Converse, USN, 794 79 44
Born 11 June 1943, Puyallup, Washington
Active duty since 1 February 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Melvin Ray Converse, Iowa
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Oak Hill Cemetery, Cherokee, Iowa, Plot Blk 2N, Lot 15, grave 4

Thomas Ray Thornton, February 1, 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Thomas Ray Thornton, USN, 997 97 91
Born 1 Febuary 1944, Springfield, Ohio
Active duty since 27 July 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Ray Thornton, Springfield, Ohio
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
- body recovered later
Buried: Ferncliff Cemetery, Springfield, Ohio.

Francis Brown, May 6, 1947 - June 8, 1967
QM3 Francis Brown, USN, 778 76 70
Born 6 May 1947, Albany, New York
Active duty since 6 August 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wade Brown, Troy, NY
Died on bridge while operating the helm

James Lee Lenau, January 9, 1947 - June 8, 1967
CTSN James Lee Lenau, USN, 997 56 58
Born 9 January 1947, Washington, Missouri
Active duty since 24 September 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Leander J. Lenau, Union, MO
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
in forward typewriter repair shop

Curtis Alan Graves, February 10, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT1 Curtis Alan Graves, USN, 519 58 24
Born 10 February 1943, Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan
Active duty since 22 August 1961
Mother: Florence McCullum Graves, Ft. Lauderdale, FL
Father: deceased
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #3773, Section 67
Remembrance: Memorial display planned for Military and Space Museum,
Frankenmuth, Michigan (dedication summer 1990).
Remembrance: Graves Hall (barracks) in Pensacola, Florida.

PC2 John Clarence Spicher, USN, 473 41 77
Born 15 Febuary 1937, Terentum, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 23 September 1954
Wife: Linda Lee Spicher
7901 Hampton Blvd., Norfolk, Virginia
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John E. Spicher, Brackenridge, PA
Hit with rocket on main deck, died receiving emergency aid
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #11362D, Section 13

John Spicher, February 15, 1937 - June 8, 1967
PC2 John Clarence Spicher, USN, 473 41 77
Born 15 Febuary 1937, Terentum, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 23 September 1954
Wife: Linda Lee Spicher
7901 Hampton Blvd., Norfolk, Virginia
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John E. Spicher, Brackenridge, PA
Hit with rocket on main deck, died receiving emergency aid
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #11362D, Section 13

Philippe Charles Tiedtke, 17 October 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Philippe Charles Tiedtke, USN, 914 32 84
Born 17 October 1944, Santa Cruz, California
Active duty since 2 September 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Arthur L. Tiedtke, Modesto, CA
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Lakewood Memorial Park, Hughson, CA

Robert Burton Eisenberg, 12 October 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Robert Burton Eisenberg, USN, 776 09 35
Born 12 October 1944, St. Paul, Minnesota
Active duty since 3 February 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Benj. Eisenberg, St. Paul, MN
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Duane Marggraf, January 27, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Duane Rowe Marggraf, USN, 773 96 50
Born 27 January 1945, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin
Active duty since 6 July 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Carlton H. Marggraf, Fond du Lac, WI
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Remembrance: Brass Marker initially installed at Lakeside Park,
Fon du Lac, in the 1980s, later vanished to storage in the basement
of a city building. Following protests from local citizens, it was
placed on a wall in the Fon du Lac Court House.

John Caleb Smith, July 13, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT1 John Caleb Smith, Jr., USN, 237 77 94
Born 13 July 1943, Ithaca, New York
Active duty since 30 June 1961
Wife: Sandra Ann Smith, 203 Wood Street, Ithica, NY
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John Caleb Smith, Sr., Ithica, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Jack Lewis Raper, August 28, 1944 - June 8, 1967
SGT Jack Lewis Raper, USMC, 1994072
Born 28 August 1944, Cedartown, Georgia
Active duty since 1 August 1962
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

Philip McCutcheon Armstrong July 4, 1929 - June 8, 1967

LCDR Philip McCutcheon Armstrong, Jr., USN, 569825/1100
Born 4 July 1929, Detroit, Michigan
Active duty since 5 June 1953
US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Class of 1953
Wife: Marie Kearney "Weetie" Armstrong, Virginia Beach, VA
Father: Philip M.C. Armstrong, Detroit, Michigan
Mortally wounded near the bridge attempting to extinguish large fire
Died about 4 hours later in battle dressing station
Received Navy Cross for heroism during battle
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery grave 2096X, Section 3
His wife died in 1988 of cancer.
Remembrance: Memorial display: Hall of Heroes, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland
Memorial display: Military and Space Museum,
Frankenmuth, Michigan, dedicated November, 1990, contains
his Navy Cross, uniform, story of attack, copy of Ennes' book.

Lawrence P. Hayden, June 16, 1947 - June 8, 1967
CTSN Lawrence Paul Hayden, USN, B70 53 70
Born 16 June 1947, Houston, Texas
Active duty since 2 May 1966
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. James H. Hayden, Houston, Texas
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

David Skolak, August 12, 1946 - June 8, 1967
ICFN David NMN Skolak, USN, B50 17 83
Born 12 August 1946, Gary, Indiana
Active duty since 24 January 1966
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Rudolph J. Skolak, Gary, Indiana
Died in forward gun mount returning fire

Richard W. Keene, October 23, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Richard Walter Keene, Jr., USN, 778 82 75
Born 23 October 1945, Batavia, New York
Active duty since 10 November 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Richard W. Keene, Sr., Poughkeepsie, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Carl C. Nygren, May 17, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CTSN Carl Christian Nygren, USN, 788 37 16
Born 17 May 1945, Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 19 August 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Arvid C. Nygren, North Babylon, LI, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

Frederick James Walton, November 28, 1935 - June 8, 1967
CT1 Frederick James Walton, USN, 236 31 86
Born 28 November 1935, Niagara Falls, New York
Active duty since 8 December 1952
Wife: Audry Jane Walton, #3 Deuro Drive, Niagara Falls, NY
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Horace F. Walton, Niagara Falls, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Edward Emory Rehmeyer III, September 25, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CPL Edward Emory Rehmeyer, III, USMC 2120919
Born 25 September 1945, York, Pennsylvania
Parents address 10/93: Mr. & Mrs. Ed Rehmeyer, Jr., Shrewsbury, PA 17361
Active duty since 8 October 1964
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Ronnie Jordon Campbell, November 4, 1942 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Ronnie Jordon Campbell, USN, 586 13 23
Born 4 November 1942, Sevierville, Tennessee
Active duty since 6 September 1961
Wife: Elizabeth E. Campbell
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Raymond C. Campbell, Sevierville, Tennessee
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave 1145C, Section 13
Remembrance: Ronnie Campbell Barracks in Edzell, Scotland

Alan Higgins, January 27, 1948 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Alan (NMN) Higgins, USN, 788 62 97
Born 27 January 1948, Weymouth, Massachusetts
Active duty since 16 September 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wilbur C. Higgins, Dover, Delaware
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #1773, Section 12

Alexander Neil Thompson, Jr., April 5, 1943 - June 8, 1967
GMG3 Alexander Neil Thompson, Jr., USN, 770 47 21
Born 5 April 1943, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 5 September 1963
Wife: Gail E. Thompson, 4 Crystal Drive, Warwick, Rhode Island
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Alexander A. Thompson, Greely, Pennsylvania
Died in forward gun mount
Remembrance: Navy gunnery training building for the Aegis system
named in his memory in 1990.

Jerry Lee Goss, Jr., May 30, 1941 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Jerry Lee Goss, USNR, 773 61 55
Born 30 May 1941, North Vernon, Indiana
Active duty since 29 June 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Harry Herschel Goss, North Vernon, IN
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

James Mahlon Lupton, October 29, 1942 - June 8, 1967
CT1 James Mahlon Lupton, USN, 511 31 28
Born 20 October 1942, Shreveport, Louisiana
Active duty since 26 June 1962
Wife: Barbara Joan Lupton, 25E Sobria Loka, Yalova, Turkey
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Clyde Knot Lupton, Shreveport, LA
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

William Bernard Allenbaugh, January 23, 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT3 William Bernard Allenbaugh, USN, 684 49 96
Born 23 January 1944, Baltimore, Maryland
Active duty since 10 June 1964
Wife: Sandra Lee Allenbaugh, Lothian, Maryland
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Francis Allenbaugh, Baltimore, Maryland
Memorial: Mr. & Mrs. Allenbaugh presented a memorial plaque to
Calvert Hall College, a catholic high school attended by Wm. Allenbaugh,
in his memory.

Untitled Poem - By William B. Allenbaugh, Jr.
This is dedicated to my father, William Bernard Allenbaugh, Sr. killed on the USS LIBERTY, 8 June 1967

Fathers work,
To earn their pay,
To raise their families,
Day by Day.

Fathers console their children,
When they are sad,
They punish their children
When they are bad.

Some families don't have Fathers,
They are killed or die,
Some are in prison,
Others run away and cry.

But without Fathers,
Where would we be,
Probably swimming out farther,
Then drowning, helplessly at sea.

Warren Edward Hersey, October 14, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT1 Warren Edward Hersey, USN, 903 67 11
Born 14 October 1943, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 4 April 1961
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Warren O. Hersey, Stoneham, Mass.
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Raymond Eugene Linn, June 30, 1928 - June 8, 1967
CTC Raymond Eugene Linn, USN, 571 13 74
Born 30 June 1928, Adamsville, Ohio
Active duty since 25 September 1946
Divorced
Adopted Daughter: Linda Loucille Linn, Zanesville, Ohio
Daughter: Joy (Mrs. Larry R.) Linn Evans, Aurora, Ohio 44202
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #1724, Section 12
Remembrance: Linn Barracks in Japan
Linn Operations Building in Sugar Grove, West Virginia

Gary Ray Blanchard, September 16, 1946 - June 8, 1967
SN Gary Ray Blanchard, USN, 771 77 22
Born 16 September 1946, Wichita, Kansas
Active duty since 11 February 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Earl T. Blanchard, Wichita, Kansas
Died on operating table 0315 June 9, 1967
Buried: Lakeview Cemetery and Mausoleum, Wichita, Kansas

Anthony Peter Mendle, December, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Anthony Peter Mendle, USN, 777 62 87
Born 4 December 1945, Waterbury, Connecticut
Active duty since 11 August 1964 or 1965 (dates conflict)
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John J. Mendle, Glendale, Arizona
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Resthaven Park Cemetary (West), Glendale AZ

David W. Marlborough, September 28, 1948 - June 8, 1967
CTSN David Walter Marlborough, USN, B10 04 80
Born 28 September 1948, Waterville, Maine
Active duty since 26 July 1966
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wm. M. Marlborough, Springfield, Mass.
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

Carl Lewis Hoar, May 29, 1945 - June 8, 1967
SN Carl Lewis Hoar, USN, 774 46 48
(Shown as Carl Lewis Hoar on list sent for Navy Memorial)
(Shown as Carl Louis Hoar on official 1967 final casualty list)
Born 29 May 1945, Mount Vernon, Ohio
Active duty since 29 November 1963
Parents: Mr. and Mrs. James B. Hoar, Mt. Vernon, Ohio
Buried: Mt. Vernon, Ohio

Allen Merle Blue, September 5, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Allen Merle Blue, USNR-R, 391 18 71
Born 5 September 1943, Yakima, Washington
Active duty USN from 22 SEP 61 to 21 JAN 66
Serving as a civilian for NSA
Parents: Washington State
Wife: Patricia Baccus Blue
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave 745, Section 48

Stephen Spencer Toth, September 12, 1939 - June 8, 1967
LT Stephen Spencer Toth, USN, 669613/1100
Born 12 September 1939, San Diego, California
Active duty since 5 June 1963
US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Class of 1963
Wife: Regina Chermont Toth, US Mission to Brazil
Avenida Morambi 3819, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Parents: Capt. & Mrs. Joseph C. Toth, USN, Virginia Beach, VA
Father: deceased - died about 1968.
Died 01 or 02 level, port side, of rocket fire
Received Silver Star for heroism during battle
Memorial display, Hall of Heroes, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland
Buried: U. S. Naval Academy Cemetery, Annapolis, Maryland

Melvin Douglas Smith, February 27, 1938 - June 8, 1967
CTC Melvin Douglas Smith, USN, 493 95 96
Born 27 February 1938, Alamance, North Carolina
Active duty since 4 April 1956
Wife: Judith Ann Smith, 304 Moreno Courts, Warrington, Florida
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Carlton Melvin Smith, Alamance, North Carolina
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Remembrance: Smith Barracks in Florida

In May of 1966 Doug received an assignment to sea duty, and he boarded the USS Liberty on May 31, 1966. The family had moved back to North Carolina, and another son, Tim, was born there. The Liberty docked on February 28, 1967, and Doug rushed home to see his youngest son for the first time.

Doug's death on the Liberty continues to shiver through the lives of those who loved him. His oldest son, Douglas, recently wrote a poem for his father, "Epitaph at Sea with Constellation Above." In the poem, his father disappears, line by line, from the world:

Mariner, descend, and the sea conceal
bird and sky and the drowned father below,
who shall not sing, who shall not rise, but dwells
among the abandoned gods, a body
unfolding dark, restless and fathoms deep.
____________________________________________________________________
Join the memorial service for the USS Liberty victims on June 8, 2013 at noon at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery.
Please call for an investigation to help bring closure to the sailors and their families who have suffered and felt betrayed by their country for 45 years.

Please read some of the articles about the USS Liberty published by the Washington Reportover the past 30 years. On Jan. 12, 2004 the U.S. State Department held a highly charged panel discussion on the attack, and prevented survivors and military experts who played a role in the tragedy from speaking (see Washington Report, March 2004, pages 9-11,http://www.wrmea.org/archives/259-washington-report-archives-2000-2005/march-2004/5019-those-not-invited-to-speak-steal-the-show-at-state-department-liberty-discussion.html.
It’s past time for a serious discussion with USS Liberty survivors and other experts. It is the least these unsung heroes—and all Americans—deserve.
https://www.facebook.com/events/186293598165055/
____________________________________________________________________

A former Navy attorney who helped lead the military investigation of the 1967 Israeli attack on the USS Liberty that killed 34 American servicemen says former President Lyndon Johnson and his defense secretary, Robert McNamara, ordered that the inquiry conclude the incident was an accident.

In a signed affidavit released at a Capitol Hill news conference, retired Capt. Ward Boston said Johnson and McNamara told those heading the Navy's inquiry to "conclude that the attack was a case of 'mistaken identity' despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary."

It was “one of the classic all-American cover-ups,” said retired Admiral Thomas Moorer, a former Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman who spent a year investigating the attack as part of an independent panel he formed with other former military officials. The panel also included a former US ambassador to Saudi Arabia, James Akins.

Torpedo hole in USS Liberty

“Why would our government put Israel’s interests ahead of our own?” Moorer asked from his wheelchair at the news conference. He was chief of naval operations at the time of the attack.

Moorer, who has long held that the attack was a deliberate act, wants Congress to investigate. [Newsday]

Israel claims the USS Liberty was mistaken for the out-of-service Egyptian horse carrier El Quseir. Giddy up!

Fifteen years after the attack, an Israeli pilot approached Liberty survivors and then held extensive interviews with former Congressman Paul N. (Pete) McCloskey about his role. According to this senior Israeli lead pilot, he recognized the Liberty as American immediately, so informed his headquarters, and was told to ignore the American flag and continue his attack. He refused to do so and returned to base, where he was arrested.

Later, a dual-citizen Israeli major told survivors that he was in an Israeli war room where he heard that pilot's radio report. The attacking pilots and everyone in the Israeli war room knew that they were attacking an American ship, the major said. He recanted the statement only after he received threatening phone calls from Israel.

The pilot's protests also were heard by radio monitors in the U.S. Embassy in Lebanon. Then-U.S. Ambassador to Lebanon Dwight Porter has confirmed this. Porter told his story to syndicated columnists Rowland Evans and Robert Novak and offered to submit to further questioning by authorities. Unfortunately, no one in the U.S. government has any interest in hearing these first-person accounts of Israeli treachery. [Washington Report]

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Then, inexplicably, at 2 p.m., unmarked Israeli aircraft began attacking the ship." [Ledger Enquirer]

Israel attacked the USS Liberty using UNMARKED AIRCRAFT. This is the single fact which proves Israel knew exactly who they were attacking. Israel's story is that they thought USS Liberty was an Egyptian ship and therefore a legitimate target of war. Were that true, there would be no reason to attack a supposedly Egyptian ship with unmarked aircraft. The only possible reason to use unmarked aircraft to attack the ship is that Israel knew it was an American ship and intended to sink it, then to blame the attack on Egypt.

Moorer, who as top legal council to the official investigation is in a position to know, agrees that Israel intended to sink the USS Liberty and blame Egypt for it, thus dragging the United States into a war on Israel's behalf. This seems to be a common trick of Israel. Starting with the Lavon affair, through the USS Liberty, to the fake radio transmitter that tricked Reagan into attacking Libya, to potentially 9-11 itself, Israel's game is to frame Arabs and set them up as targets for the United States.

The official US investigation is discredited. And with it, every claim of innocence for Israel that relied on the official investigation as a source.

The real question facing the American people is why the US Government seems more concerned with protecting Israel after they are caught playing these dirty tricks, rather than doing something to convince Israel not to kill any more Americans.

"Evidence linking these Israelis to 9/11 is classified. I cannot tell you about evidence that has been gathered. It's classified information." -- US official quoted in Carl Cameron's Fox News report on the Israeli spy ring and its connections to 9-11.

Dead In The Water - The Sinking of the USS Liberty
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iy2gkkp8Cl8

USS Liberty Cover Up - Full Movie- The Loss Of Liberty
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFQrsdj7BLs
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-LITjLrjbEU0/VKBRhor_KiI/AAAAAAAE1FQ/LVeHnyARW0k/w506-h750/1511077_10154172416050005_2522448360988742617_n.jpg
4 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/101053863656289501674 CHUCK W (CHUCK RAINBOWMAN) : On June 8, 1967, 34 American servicemen were killed and 174 were wounded during an Israeli attack on...
On June 8, 1967, 34 American servicemen were killed and 174 were wounded during an Israeli attack on the USS Liberty. According to former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Thomas Moorer, “Those men were then betrayed and left to die by our own government.” The survivors are still awaiting justice.

Rest In Peace

LT James Cecil Pierce, USN, 649805/6462
Born 11 July 1924, Clinton, North Carolina
Active duty since 6 August 1941
Wife: Pauline M. Pierce, Virginia Beach (died later)
Parents: deceased
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
while destroying registered publications
Wife: died soon after.
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, grave 8576R, Section 13

Jerry Leroy Converse, June 11, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Jerry Leroy Converse, USN, 794 79 44
Born 11 June 1943, Puyallup, Washington
Active duty since 1 February 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Melvin Ray Converse, Iowa
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Oak Hill Cemetery, Cherokee, Iowa, Plot Blk 2N, Lot 15, grave 4

Thomas Ray Thornton, February 1, 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Thomas Ray Thornton, USN, 997 97 91
Born 1 Febuary 1944, Springfield, Ohio
Active duty since 27 July 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Ray Thornton, Springfield, Ohio
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
- body recovered later
Buried: Ferncliff Cemetery, Springfield, Ohio.

Francis Brown, May 6, 1947 - June 8, 1967
QM3 Francis Brown, USN, 778 76 70
Born 6 May 1947, Albany, New York
Active duty since 6 August 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wade Brown, Troy, NY
Died on bridge while operating the helm

James Lee Lenau, January 9, 1947 - June 8, 1967
CTSN James Lee Lenau, USN, 997 56 58
Born 9 January 1947, Washington, Missouri
Active duty since 24 September 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Leander J. Lenau, Union, MO
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
in forward typewriter repair shop

Curtis Alan Graves, February 10, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT1 Curtis Alan Graves, USN, 519 58 24
Born 10 February 1943, Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan
Active duty since 22 August 1961
Mother: Florence McCullum Graves, Ft. Lauderdale, FL
Father: deceased
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #3773, Section 67
Remembrance: Memorial display planned for Military and Space Museum,
Frankenmuth, Michigan (dedication summer 1990).
Remembrance: Graves Hall (barracks) in Pensacola, Florida.

PC2 John Clarence Spicher, USN, 473 41 77
Born 15 Febuary 1937, Terentum, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 23 September 1954
Wife: Linda Lee Spicher
7901 Hampton Blvd., Norfolk, Virginia
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John E. Spicher, Brackenridge, PA
Hit with rocket on main deck, died receiving emergency aid
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #11362D, Section 13

John Spicher, February 15, 1937 - June 8, 1967
PC2 John Clarence Spicher, USN, 473 41 77
Born 15 Febuary 1937, Terentum, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 23 September 1954
Wife: Linda Lee Spicher
7901 Hampton Blvd., Norfolk, Virginia
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John E. Spicher, Brackenridge, PA
Hit with rocket on main deck, died receiving emergency aid
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #11362D, Section 13

Philippe Charles Tiedtke, 17 October 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Philippe Charles Tiedtke, USN, 914 32 84
Born 17 October 1944, Santa Cruz, California
Active duty since 2 September 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Arthur L. Tiedtke, Modesto, CA
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Lakewood Memorial Park, Hughson, CA

Robert Burton Eisenberg, 12 October 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Robert Burton Eisenberg, USN, 776 09 35
Born 12 October 1944, St. Paul, Minnesota
Active duty since 3 February 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Benj. Eisenberg, St. Paul, MN
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Duane Marggraf, January 27, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Duane Rowe Marggraf, USN, 773 96 50
Born 27 January 1945, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin
Active duty since 6 July 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Carlton H. Marggraf, Fond du Lac, WI
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Remembrance: Brass Marker initially installed at Lakeside Park,
Fon du Lac, in the 1980s, later vanished to storage in the basement
of a city building. Following protests from local citizens, it was
placed on a wall in the Fon du Lac Court House.

John Caleb Smith, July 13, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT1 John Caleb Smith, Jr., USN, 237 77 94
Born 13 July 1943, Ithaca, New York
Active duty since 30 June 1961
Wife: Sandra Ann Smith, 203 Wood Street, Ithica, NY
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John Caleb Smith, Sr., Ithica, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Jack Lewis Raper, August 28, 1944 - June 8, 1967
SGT Jack Lewis Raper, USMC, 1994072
Born 28 August 1944, Cedartown, Georgia
Active duty since 1 August 1962
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

Philip McCutcheon Armstrong July 4, 1929 - June 8, 1967

LCDR Philip McCutcheon Armstrong, Jr., USN, 569825/1100
Born 4 July 1929, Detroit, Michigan
Active duty since 5 June 1953
US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Class of 1953
Wife: Marie Kearney "Weetie" Armstrong, Virginia Beach, VA
Father: Philip M.C. Armstrong, Detroit, Michigan
Mortally wounded near the bridge attempting to extinguish large fire
Died about 4 hours later in battle dressing station
Received Navy Cross for heroism during battle
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery grave 2096X, Section 3
His wife died in 1988 of cancer.
Remembrance: Memorial display: Hall of Heroes, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland
Memorial display: Military and Space Museum,
Frankenmuth, Michigan, dedicated November, 1990, contains
his Navy Cross, uniform, story of attack, copy of Ennes' book.

Lawrence P. Hayden, June 16, 1947 - June 8, 1967
CTSN Lawrence Paul Hayden, USN, B70 53 70
Born 16 June 1947, Houston, Texas
Active duty since 2 May 1966
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. James H. Hayden, Houston, Texas
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

David Skolak, August 12, 1946 - June 8, 1967
ICFN David NMN Skolak, USN, B50 17 83
Born 12 August 1946, Gary, Indiana
Active duty since 24 January 1966
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Rudolph J. Skolak, Gary, Indiana
Died in forward gun mount returning fire

Richard W. Keene, October 23, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Richard Walter Keene, Jr., USN, 778 82 75
Born 23 October 1945, Batavia, New York
Active duty since 10 November 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Richard W. Keene, Sr., Poughkeepsie, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Carl C. Nygren, May 17, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CTSN Carl Christian Nygren, USN, 788 37 16
Born 17 May 1945, Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 19 August 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Arvid C. Nygren, North Babylon, LI, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

Frederick James Walton, November 28, 1935 - June 8, 1967
CT1 Frederick James Walton, USN, 236 31 86
Born 28 November 1935, Niagara Falls, New York
Active duty since 8 December 1952
Wife: Audry Jane Walton, #3 Deuro Drive, Niagara Falls, NY
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Horace F. Walton, Niagara Falls, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Edward Emory Rehmeyer III, September 25, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CPL Edward Emory Rehmeyer, III, USMC 2120919
Born 25 September 1945, York, Pennsylvania
Parents address 10/93: Mr. & Mrs. Ed Rehmeyer, Jr., Shrewsbury, PA 17361
Active duty since 8 October 1964
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Ronnie Jordon Campbell, November 4, 1942 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Ronnie Jordon Campbell, USN, 586 13 23
Born 4 November 1942, Sevierville, Tennessee
Active duty since 6 September 1961
Wife: Elizabeth E. Campbell
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Raymond C. Campbell, Sevierville, Tennessee
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave 1145C, Section 13
Remembrance: Ronnie Campbell Barracks in Edzell, Scotland

Alan Higgins, January 27, 1948 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Alan (NMN) Higgins, USN, 788 62 97
Born 27 January 1948, Weymouth, Massachusetts
Active duty since 16 September 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wilbur C. Higgins, Dover, Delaware
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #1773, Section 12

Alexander Neil Thompson, Jr., April 5, 1943 - June 8, 1967
GMG3 Alexander Neil Thompson, Jr., USN, 770 47 21
Born 5 April 1943, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 5 September 1963
Wife: Gail E. Thompson, 4 Crystal Drive, Warwick, Rhode Island
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Alexander A. Thompson, Greely, Pennsylvania
Died in forward gun mount
Remembrance: Navy gunnery training building for the Aegis system
named in his memory in 1990.

Jerry Lee Goss, Jr., May 30, 1941 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Jerry Lee Goss, USNR, 773 61 55
Born 30 May 1941, North Vernon, Indiana
Active duty since 29 June 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Harry Herschel Goss, North Vernon, IN
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

James Mahlon Lupton, October 29, 1942 - June 8, 1967
CT1 James Mahlon Lupton, USN, 511 31 28
Born 20 October 1942, Shreveport, Louisiana
Active duty since 26 June 1962
Wife: Barbara Joan Lupton, 25E Sobria Loka, Yalova, Turkey
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Clyde Knot Lupton, Shreveport, LA
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

William Bernard Allenbaugh, January 23, 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT3 William Bernard Allenbaugh, USN, 684 49 96
Born 23 January 1944, Baltimore, Maryland
Active duty since 10 June 1964
Wife: Sandra Lee Allenbaugh, Lothian, Maryland
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Francis Allenbaugh, Baltimore, Maryland
Memorial: Mr. & Mrs. Allenbaugh presented a memorial plaque to
Calvert Hall College, a catholic high school attended by Wm. Allenbaugh,
in his memory.

Untitled Poem - By William B. Allenbaugh, Jr.
This is dedicated to my father, William Bernard Allenbaugh, Sr. killed on the USS LIBERTY, 8 June 1967

Fathers work,
To earn their pay,
To raise their families,
Day by Day.

Fathers console their children,
When they are sad,
They punish their children
When they are bad.

Some families don't have Fathers,
They are killed or die,
Some are in prison,
Others run away and cry.

But without Fathers,
Where would we be,
Probably swimming out farther,
Then drowning, helplessly at sea.

Warren Edward Hersey, October 14, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT1 Warren Edward Hersey, USN, 903 67 11
Born 14 October 1943, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 4 April 1961
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Warren O. Hersey, Stoneham, Mass.
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Raymond Eugene Linn, June 30, 1928 - June 8, 1967
CTC Raymond Eugene Linn, USN, 571 13 74
Born 30 June 1928, Adamsville, Ohio
Active duty since 25 September 1946
Divorced
Adopted Daughter: Linda Loucille Linn, Zanesville, Ohio
Daughter: Joy (Mrs. Larry R.) Linn Evans, Aurora, Ohio 44202
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #1724, Section 12
Remembrance: Linn Barracks in Japan
Linn Operations Building in Sugar Grove, West Virginia

Gary Ray Blanchard, September 16, 1946 - June 8, 1967
SN Gary Ray Blanchard, USN, 771 77 22
Born 16 September 1946, Wichita, Kansas
Active duty since 11 February 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Earl T. Blanchard, Wichita, Kansas
Died on operating table 0315 June 9, 1967
Buried: Lakeview Cemetery and Mausoleum, Wichita, Kansas

Anthony Peter Mendle, December, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Anthony Peter Mendle, USN, 777 62 87
Born 4 December 1945, Waterbury, Connecticut
Active duty since 11 August 1964 or 1965 (dates conflict)
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John J. Mendle, Glendale, Arizona
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Resthaven Park Cemetary (West), Glendale AZ

David W. Marlborough, September 28, 1948 - June 8, 1967
CTSN David Walter Marlborough, USN, B10 04 80
Born 28 September 1948, Waterville, Maine
Active duty since 26 July 1966
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wm. M. Marlborough, Springfield, Mass.
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

Carl Lewis Hoar, May 29, 1945 - June 8, 1967
SN Carl Lewis Hoar, USN, 774 46 48
(Shown as Carl Lewis Hoar on list sent for Navy Memorial)
(Shown as Carl Louis Hoar on official 1967 final casualty list)
Born 29 May 1945, Mount Vernon, Ohio
Active duty since 29 November 1963
Parents: Mr. and Mrs. James B. Hoar, Mt. Vernon, Ohio
Buried: Mt. Vernon, Ohio

Allen Merle Blue, September 5, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Allen Merle Blue, USNR-R, 391 18 71
Born 5 September 1943, Yakima, Washington
Active duty USN from 22 SEP 61 to 21 JAN 66
Serving as a civilian for NSA
Parents: Washington State
Wife: Patricia Baccus Blue
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave 745, Section 48

Stephen Spencer Toth, September 12, 1939 - June 8, 1967
LT Stephen Spencer Toth, USN, 669613/1100
Born 12 September 1939, San Diego, California
Active duty since 5 June 1963
US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Class of 1963
Wife: Regina Chermont Toth, US Mission to Brazil
Avenida Morambi 3819, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Parents: Capt. & Mrs. Joseph C. Toth, USN, Virginia Beach, VA
Father: deceased - died about 1968.
Died 01 or 02 level, port side, of rocket fire
Received Silver Star for heroism during battle
Memorial display, Hall of Heroes, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland
Buried: U. S. Naval Academy Cemetery, Annapolis, Maryland

Melvin Douglas Smith, February 27, 1938 - June 8, 1967
CTC Melvin Douglas Smith, USN, 493 95 96
Born 27 February 1938, Alamance, North Carolina
Active duty since 4 April 1956
Wife: Judith Ann Smith, 304 Moreno Courts, Warrington, Florida
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Carlton Melvin Smith, Alamance, North Carolina
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Remembrance: Smith Barracks in Florida

In May of 1966 Doug received an assignment to sea duty, and he boarded the USS Liberty on May 31, 1966. The family had moved back to North Carolina, and another son, Tim, was born there. The Liberty docked on February 28, 1967, and Doug rushed home to see his youngest son for the first time.

Doug's death on the Liberty continues to shiver through the lives of those who loved him. His oldest son, Douglas, recently wrote a poem for his father, "Epitaph at Sea with Constellation Above." In the poem, his father disappears, line by line, from the world:

Mariner, descend, and the sea conceal
bird and sky and the drowned father below,
who shall not sing, who shall not rise, but dwells
among the abandoned gods, a body
unfolding dark, restless and fathoms deep.
____________________________________________________________________
Join the memorial service for the USS Liberty victims on June 8, 2013 at noon at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery.
Please call for an investigation to help bring closure to the sailors and their families who have suffered and felt betrayed by their country for 45 years.

Please read some of the articles about the USS Liberty published by the Washington Reportover the past 30 years. On Jan. 12, 2004 the U.S. State Department held a highly charged panel discussion on the attack, and prevented survivors and military experts who played a role in the tragedy from speaking (see Washington Report, March 2004, pages 9-11,http://www.wrmea.org/archives/259-washington-report-archives-2000-2005/march-2004/5019-those-not-invited-to-speak-steal-the-show-at-state-department-liberty-discussion.html.
It’s past time for a serious discussion with USS Liberty survivors and other experts. It is the least these unsung heroes—and all Americans—deserve.
https://www.facebook.com/events/186293598165055/
____________________________________________________________________

A former Navy attorney who helped lead the military investigation of the 1967 Israeli attack on the USS Liberty that killed 34 American servicemen says former President Lyndon Johnson and his defense secretary, Robert McNamara, ordered that the inquiry conclude the incident was an accident.

In a signed affidavit released at a Capitol Hill news conference, retired Capt. Ward Boston said Johnson and McNamara told those heading the Navy's inquiry to "conclude that the attack was a case of 'mistaken identity' despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary."

It was “one of the classic all-American cover-ups,” said retired Admiral Thomas Moorer, a former Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman who spent a year investigating the attack as part of an independent panel he formed with other former military officials. The panel also included a former US ambassador to Saudi Arabia, James Akins.

Torpedo hole in USS Liberty

“Why would our government put Israel’s interests ahead of our own?” Moorer asked from his wheelchair at the news conference. He was chief of naval operations at the time of the attack.

Moorer, who has long held that the attack was a deliberate act, wants Congress to investigate. [Newsday]

Israel claims the USS Liberty was mistaken for the out-of-service Egyptian horse carrier El Quseir. Giddy up!

Fifteen years after the attack, an Israeli pilot approached Liberty survivors and then held extensive interviews with former Congressman Paul N. (Pete) McCloskey about his role. According to this senior Israeli lead pilot, he recognized the Liberty as American immediately, so informed his headquarters, and was told to ignore the American flag and continue his attack. He refused to do so and returned to base, where he was arrested.

Later, a dual-citizen Israeli major told survivors that he was in an Israeli war room where he heard that pilot's radio report. The attacking pilots and everyone in the Israeli war room knew that they were attacking an American ship, the major said. He recanted the statement only after he received threatening phone calls from Israel.

The pilot's protests also were heard by radio monitors in the U.S. Embassy in Lebanon. Then-U.S. Ambassador to Lebanon Dwight Porter has confirmed this. Porter told his story to syndicated columnists Rowland Evans and Robert Novak and offered to submit to further questioning by authorities. Unfortunately, no one in the U.S. government has any interest in hearing these first-person accounts of Israeli treachery. [Washington Report]

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Then, inexplicably, at 2 p.m., unmarked Israeli aircraft began attacking the ship." [Ledger Enquirer]

Israel attacked the USS Liberty using UNMARKED AIRCRAFT. This is the single fact which proves Israel knew exactly who they were attacking. Israel's story is that they thought USS Liberty was an Egyptian ship and therefore a legitimate target of war. Were that true, there would be no reason to attack a supposedly Egyptian ship with unmarked aircraft. The only possible reason to use unmarked aircraft to attack the ship is that Israel knew it was an American ship and intended to sink it, then to blame the attack on Egypt.

Moorer, who as top legal council to the official investigation is in a position to know, agrees that Israel intended to sink the USS Liberty and blame Egypt for it, thus dragging the United States into a war on Israel's behalf. This seems to be a common trick of Israel. Starting with the Lavon affair, through the USS Liberty, to the fake radio transmitter that tricked Reagan into attacking Libya, to potentially 9-11 itself, Israel's game is to frame Arabs and set them up as targets for the United States.

The official US investigation is discredited. And with it, every claim of innocence for Israel that relied on the official investigation as a source.

The real question facing the American people is why the US Government seems more concerned with protecting Israel after they are caught playing these dirty tricks, rather than doing something to convince Israel not to kill any more Americans.

"Evidence linking these Israelis to 9/11 is classified. I cannot tell you about evidence that has been gathered. It's classified information." -- US official quoted in Carl Cameron's Fox News report on the Israeli spy ring and its connections to 9-11.

Dead In The Water - The Sinking of the USS Liberty
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iy2gkkp8Cl8

USS Liberty Cover Up - Full Movie- The Loss Of Liberty
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFQrsdj7BLs
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-LITjLrjbEU0/VKBRhor_KiI/AAAAAAAE1FQ/LVeHnyARW0k/w506-h750/1511077_10154172416050005_2522448360988742617_n.jpg
4 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/112263988974242763527 fazekas ildikó : On June 8, 1967, 34 American servicemen were killed and 174 were wounded during an Israeli attack on...
On June 8, 1967, 34 American servicemen were killed and 174 were wounded during an Israeli attack on the USS Liberty. According to former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Thomas Moorer, “Those men were then betrayed and left to die by our own government.” The survivors are still awaiting justice.

Rest In Peace

LT James Cecil Pierce, USN, 649805/6462
Born 11 July 1924, Clinton, North Carolina
Active duty since 6 August 1941
Wife: Pauline M. Pierce, Virginia Beach (died later)
Parents: deceased
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
while destroying registered publications
Wife: died soon after.
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, grave 8576R, Section 13

Jerry Leroy Converse, June 11, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Jerry Leroy Converse, USN, 794 79 44
Born 11 June 1943, Puyallup, Washington
Active duty since 1 February 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Melvin Ray Converse, Iowa
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Oak Hill Cemetery, Cherokee, Iowa, Plot Blk 2N, Lot 15, grave 4

Thomas Ray Thornton, February 1, 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Thomas Ray Thornton, USN, 997 97 91
Born 1 Febuary 1944, Springfield, Ohio
Active duty since 27 July 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Ray Thornton, Springfield, Ohio
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
- body recovered later
Buried: Ferncliff Cemetery, Springfield, Ohio.

Francis Brown, May 6, 1947 - June 8, 1967
QM3 Francis Brown, USN, 778 76 70
Born 6 May 1947, Albany, New York
Active duty since 6 August 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wade Brown, Troy, NY
Died on bridge while operating the helm

James Lee Lenau, January 9, 1947 - June 8, 1967
CTSN James Lee Lenau, USN, 997 56 58
Born 9 January 1947, Washington, Missouri
Active duty since 24 September 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Leander J. Lenau, Union, MO
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
in forward typewriter repair shop

Curtis Alan Graves, February 10, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT1 Curtis Alan Graves, USN, 519 58 24
Born 10 February 1943, Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan
Active duty since 22 August 1961
Mother: Florence McCullum Graves, Ft. Lauderdale, FL
Father: deceased
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #3773, Section 67
Remembrance: Memorial display planned for Military and Space Museum,
Frankenmuth, Michigan (dedication summer 1990).
Remembrance: Graves Hall (barracks) in Pensacola, Florida.

PC2 John Clarence Spicher, USN, 473 41 77
Born 15 Febuary 1937, Terentum, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 23 September 1954
Wife: Linda Lee Spicher
7901 Hampton Blvd., Norfolk, Virginia
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John E. Spicher, Brackenridge, PA
Hit with rocket on main deck, died receiving emergency aid
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #11362D, Section 13

John Spicher, February 15, 1937 - June 8, 1967
PC2 John Clarence Spicher, USN, 473 41 77
Born 15 Febuary 1937, Terentum, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 23 September 1954
Wife: Linda Lee Spicher
7901 Hampton Blvd., Norfolk, Virginia
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John E. Spicher, Brackenridge, PA
Hit with rocket on main deck, died receiving emergency aid
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #11362D, Section 13

Philippe Charles Tiedtke, 17 October 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Philippe Charles Tiedtke, USN, 914 32 84
Born 17 October 1944, Santa Cruz, California
Active duty since 2 September 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Arthur L. Tiedtke, Modesto, CA
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Lakewood Memorial Park, Hughson, CA

Robert Burton Eisenberg, 12 October 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Robert Burton Eisenberg, USN, 776 09 35
Born 12 October 1944, St. Paul, Minnesota
Active duty since 3 February 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Benj. Eisenberg, St. Paul, MN
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Duane Marggraf, January 27, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Duane Rowe Marggraf, USN, 773 96 50
Born 27 January 1945, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin
Active duty since 6 July 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Carlton H. Marggraf, Fond du Lac, WI
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Remembrance: Brass Marker initially installed at Lakeside Park,
Fon du Lac, in the 1980s, later vanished to storage in the basement
of a city building. Following protests from local citizens, it was
placed on a wall in the Fon du Lac Court House.

John Caleb Smith, July 13, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT1 John Caleb Smith, Jr., USN, 237 77 94
Born 13 July 1943, Ithaca, New York
Active duty since 30 June 1961
Wife: Sandra Ann Smith, 203 Wood Street, Ithica, NY
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John Caleb Smith, Sr., Ithica, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Jack Lewis Raper, August 28, 1944 - June 8, 1967
SGT Jack Lewis Raper, USMC, 1994072
Born 28 August 1944, Cedartown, Georgia
Active duty since 1 August 1962
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

Philip McCutcheon Armstrong July 4, 1929 - June 8, 1967

LCDR Philip McCutcheon Armstrong, Jr., USN, 569825/1100
Born 4 July 1929, Detroit, Michigan
Active duty since 5 June 1953
US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Class of 1953
Wife: Marie Kearney "Weetie" Armstrong, Virginia Beach, VA
Father: Philip M.C. Armstrong, Detroit, Michigan
Mortally wounded near the bridge attempting to extinguish large fire
Died about 4 hours later in battle dressing station
Received Navy Cross for heroism during battle
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery grave 2096X, Section 3
His wife died in 1988 of cancer.
Remembrance: Memorial display: Hall of Heroes, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland
Memorial display: Military and Space Museum,
Frankenmuth, Michigan, dedicated November, 1990, contains
his Navy Cross, uniform, story of attack, copy of Ennes' book.

Lawrence P. Hayden, June 16, 1947 - June 8, 1967
CTSN Lawrence Paul Hayden, USN, B70 53 70
Born 16 June 1947, Houston, Texas
Active duty since 2 May 1966
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. James H. Hayden, Houston, Texas
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

David Skolak, August 12, 1946 - June 8, 1967
ICFN David NMN Skolak, USN, B50 17 83
Born 12 August 1946, Gary, Indiana
Active duty since 24 January 1966
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Rudolph J. Skolak, Gary, Indiana
Died in forward gun mount returning fire

Richard W. Keene, October 23, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Richard Walter Keene, Jr., USN, 778 82 75
Born 23 October 1945, Batavia, New York
Active duty since 10 November 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Richard W. Keene, Sr., Poughkeepsie, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Carl C. Nygren, May 17, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CTSN Carl Christian Nygren, USN, 788 37 16
Born 17 May 1945, Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 19 August 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Arvid C. Nygren, North Babylon, LI, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

Frederick James Walton, November 28, 1935 - June 8, 1967
CT1 Frederick James Walton, USN, 236 31 86
Born 28 November 1935, Niagara Falls, New York
Active duty since 8 December 1952
Wife: Audry Jane Walton, #3 Deuro Drive, Niagara Falls, NY
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Horace F. Walton, Niagara Falls, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Edward Emory Rehmeyer III, September 25, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CPL Edward Emory Rehmeyer, III, USMC 2120919
Born 25 September 1945, York, Pennsylvania
Parents address 10/93: Mr. & Mrs. Ed Rehmeyer, Jr., Shrewsbury, PA 17361
Active duty since 8 October 1964
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Ronnie Jordon Campbell, November 4, 1942 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Ronnie Jordon Campbell, USN, 586 13 23
Born 4 November 1942, Sevierville, Tennessee
Active duty since 6 September 1961
Wife: Elizabeth E. Campbell
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Raymond C. Campbell, Sevierville, Tennessee
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave 1145C, Section 13
Remembrance: Ronnie Campbell Barracks in Edzell, Scotland

Alan Higgins, January 27, 1948 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Alan (NMN) Higgins, USN, 788 62 97
Born 27 January 1948, Weymouth, Massachusetts
Active duty since 16 September 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wilbur C. Higgins, Dover, Delaware
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #1773, Section 12

Alexander Neil Thompson, Jr., April 5, 1943 - June 8, 1967
GMG3 Alexander Neil Thompson, Jr., USN, 770 47 21
Born 5 April 1943, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 5 September 1963
Wife: Gail E. Thompson, 4 Crystal Drive, Warwick, Rhode Island
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Alexander A. Thompson, Greely, Pennsylvania
Died in forward gun mount
Remembrance: Navy gunnery training building for the Aegis system
named in his memory in 1990.

Jerry Lee Goss, Jr., May 30, 1941 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Jerry Lee Goss, USNR, 773 61 55
Born 30 May 1941, North Vernon, Indiana
Active duty since 29 June 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Harry Herschel Goss, North Vernon, IN
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

James Mahlon Lupton, October 29, 1942 - June 8, 1967
CT1 James Mahlon Lupton, USN, 511 31 28
Born 20 October 1942, Shreveport, Louisiana
Active duty since 26 June 1962
Wife: Barbara Joan Lupton, 25E Sobria Loka, Yalova, Turkey
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Clyde Knot Lupton, Shreveport, LA
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

William Bernard Allenbaugh, January 23, 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT3 William Bernard Allenbaugh, USN, 684 49 96
Born 23 January 1944, Baltimore, Maryland
Active duty since 10 June 1964
Wife: Sandra Lee Allenbaugh, Lothian, Maryland
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Francis Allenbaugh, Baltimore, Maryland
Memorial: Mr. & Mrs. Allenbaugh presented a memorial plaque to
Calvert Hall College, a catholic high school attended by Wm. Allenbaugh,
in his memory.

Untitled Poem - By William B. Allenbaugh, Jr.
This is dedicated to my father, William Bernard Allenbaugh, Sr. killed on the USS LIBERTY, 8 June 1967

Fathers work,
To earn their pay,
To raise their families,
Day by Day.

Fathers console their children,
When they are sad,
They punish their children
When they are bad.

Some families don't have Fathers,
They are killed or die,
Some are in prison,
Others run away and cry.

But without Fathers,
Where would we be,
Probably swimming out farther,
Then drowning, helplessly at sea.

Warren Edward Hersey, October 14, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT1 Warren Edward Hersey, USN, 903 67 11
Born 14 October 1943, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 4 April 1961
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Warren O. Hersey, Stoneham, Mass.
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Raymond Eugene Linn, June 30, 1928 - June 8, 1967
CTC Raymond Eugene Linn, USN, 571 13 74
Born 30 June 1928, Adamsville, Ohio
Active duty since 25 September 1946
Divorced
Adopted Daughter: Linda Loucille Linn, Zanesville, Ohio
Daughter: Joy (Mrs. Larry R.) Linn Evans, Aurora, Ohio 44202
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #1724, Section 12
Remembrance: Linn Barracks in Japan
Linn Operations Building in Sugar Grove, West Virginia

Gary Ray Blanchard, September 16, 1946 - June 8, 1967
SN Gary Ray Blanchard, USN, 771 77 22
Born 16 September 1946, Wichita, Kansas
Active duty since 11 February 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Earl T. Blanchard, Wichita, Kansas
Died on operating table 0315 June 9, 1967
Buried: Lakeview Cemetery and Mausoleum, Wichita, Kansas

Anthony Peter Mendle, December, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Anthony Peter Mendle, USN, 777 62 87
Born 4 December 1945, Waterbury, Connecticut
Active duty since 11 August 1964 or 1965 (dates conflict)
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John J. Mendle, Glendale, Arizona
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Resthaven Park Cemetary (West), Glendale AZ

David W. Marlborough, September 28, 1948 - June 8, 1967
CTSN David Walter Marlborough, USN, B10 04 80
Born 28 September 1948, Waterville, Maine
Active duty since 26 July 1966
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wm. M. Marlborough, Springfield, Mass.
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

Carl Lewis Hoar, May 29, 1945 - June 8, 1967
SN Carl Lewis Hoar, USN, 774 46 48
(Shown as Carl Lewis Hoar on list sent for Navy Memorial)
(Shown as Carl Louis Hoar on official 1967 final casualty list)
Born 29 May 1945, Mount Vernon, Ohio
Active duty since 29 November 1963
Parents: Mr. and Mrs. James B. Hoar, Mt. Vernon, Ohio
Buried: Mt. Vernon, Ohio

Allen Merle Blue, September 5, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Allen Merle Blue, USNR-R, 391 18 71
Born 5 September 1943, Yakima, Washington
Active duty USN from 22 SEP 61 to 21 JAN 66
Serving as a civilian for NSA
Parents: Washington State
Wife: Patricia Baccus Blue
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave 745, Section 48

Stephen Spencer Toth, September 12, 1939 - June 8, 1967
LT Stephen Spencer Toth, USN, 669613/1100
Born 12 September 1939, San Diego, California
Active duty since 5 June 1963
US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Class of 1963
Wife: Regina Chermont Toth, US Mission to Brazil
Avenida Morambi 3819, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Parents: Capt. & Mrs. Joseph C. Toth, USN, Virginia Beach, VA
Father: deceased - died about 1968.
Died 01 or 02 level, port side, of rocket fire
Received Silver Star for heroism during battle
Memorial display, Hall of Heroes, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland
Buried: U. S. Naval Academy Cemetery, Annapolis, Maryland

Melvin Douglas Smith, February 27, 1938 - June 8, 1967
CTC Melvin Douglas Smith, USN, 493 95 96
Born 27 February 1938, Alamance, North Carolina
Active duty since 4 April 1956
Wife: Judith Ann Smith, 304 Moreno Courts, Warrington, Florida
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Carlton Melvin Smith, Alamance, North Carolina
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Remembrance: Smith Barracks in Florida

In May of 1966 Doug received an assignment to sea duty, and he boarded the USS Liberty on May 31, 1966. The family had moved back to North Carolina, and another son, Tim, was born there. The Liberty docked on February 28, 1967, and Doug rushed home to see his youngest son for the first time.

Doug's death on the Liberty continues to shiver through the lives of those who loved him. His oldest son, Douglas, recently wrote a poem for his father, "Epitaph at Sea with Constellation Above." In the poem, his father disappears, line by line, from the world:

Mariner, descend, and the sea conceal
bird and sky and the drowned father below,
who shall not sing, who shall not rise, but dwells
among the abandoned gods, a body
unfolding dark, restless and fathoms deep.
____________________________________________________________________
Join the memorial service for the USS Liberty victims on June 8, 2013 at noon at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery.
Please call for an investigation to help bring closure to the sailors and their families who have suffered and felt betrayed by their country for 45 years.

Please read some of the articles about the USS Liberty published by the Washington Reportover the past 30 years. On Jan. 12, 2004 the U.S. State Department held a highly charged panel discussion on the attack, and prevented survivors and military experts who played a role in the tragedy from speaking (see Washington Report, March 2004, pages 9-11,http://www.wrmea.org/archives/259-washington-report-archives-2000-2005/march-2004/5019-those-not-invited-to-speak-steal-the-show-at-state-department-liberty-discussion.html.
It’s past time for a serious discussion with USS Liberty survivors and other experts. It is the least these unsung heroes—and all Americans—deserve.
https://www.facebook.com/events/186293598165055/
____________________________________________________________________

A former Navy attorney who helped lead the military investigation of the 1967 Israeli attack on the USS Liberty that killed 34 American servicemen says former President Lyndon Johnson and his defense secretary, Robert McNamara, ordered that the inquiry conclude the incident was an accident.

In a signed affidavit released at a Capitol Hill news conference, retired Capt. Ward Boston said Johnson and McNamara told those heading the Navy's inquiry to "conclude that the attack was a case of 'mistaken identity' despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary."

It was “one of the classic all-American cover-ups,” said retired Admiral Thomas Moorer, a former Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman who spent a year investigating the attack as part of an independent panel he formed with other former military officials. The panel also included a former US ambassador to Saudi Arabia, James Akins.

Torpedo hole in USS Liberty

“Why would our government put Israel’s interests ahead of our own?” Moorer asked from his wheelchair at the news conference. He was chief of naval operations at the time of the attack.

Moorer, who has long held that the attack was a deliberate act, wants Congress to investigate. [Newsday]

Israel claims the USS Liberty was mistaken for the out-of-service Egyptian horse carrier El Quseir. Giddy up!

Fifteen years after the attack, an Israeli pilot approached Liberty survivors and then held extensive interviews with former Congressman Paul N. (Pete) McCloskey about his role. According to this senior Israeli lead pilot, he recognized the Liberty as American immediately, so informed his headquarters, and was told to ignore the American flag and continue his attack. He refused to do so and returned to base, where he was arrested.

Later, a dual-citizen Israeli major told survivors that he was in an Israeli war room where he heard that pilot's radio report. The attacking pilots and everyone in the Israeli war room knew that they were attacking an American ship, the major said. He recanted the statement only after he received threatening phone calls from Israel.

The pilot's protests also were heard by radio monitors in the U.S. Embassy in Lebanon. Then-U.S. Ambassador to Lebanon Dwight Porter has confirmed this. Porter told his story to syndicated columnists Rowland Evans and Robert Novak and offered to submit to further questioning by authorities. Unfortunately, no one in the U.S. government has any interest in hearing these first-person accounts of Israeli treachery. [Washington Report]

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Then, inexplicably, at 2 p.m., unmarked Israeli aircraft began attacking the ship." [Ledger Enquirer]

Israel attacked the USS Liberty using UNMARKED AIRCRAFT. This is the single fact which proves Israel knew exactly who they were attacking. Israel's story is that they thought USS Liberty was an Egyptian ship and therefore a legitimate target of war. Were that true, there would be no reason to attack a supposedly Egyptian ship with unmarked aircraft. The only possible reason to use unmarked aircraft to attack the ship is that Israel knew it was an American ship and intended to sink it, then to blame the attack on Egypt.

Moorer, who as top legal council to the official investigation is in a position to know, agrees that Israel intended to sink the USS Liberty and blame Egypt for it, thus dragging the United States into a war on Israel's behalf. This seems to be a common trick of Israel. Starting with the Lavon affair, through the USS Liberty, to the fake radio transmitter that tricked Reagan into attacking Libya, to potentially 9-11 itself, Israel's game is to frame Arabs and set them up as targets for the United States.

The official US investigation is discredited. And with it, every claim of innocence for Israel that relied on the official investigation as a source.

The real question facing the American people is why the US Government seems more concerned with protecting Israel after they are caught playing these dirty tricks, rather than doing something to convince Israel not to kill any more Americans.

"Evidence linking these Israelis to 9/11 is classified. I cannot tell you about evidence that has been gathered. It's classified information." -- US official quoted in Carl Cameron's Fox News report on the Israeli spy ring and its connections to 9-11.

Dead In The Water - The Sinking of the USS Liberty
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iy2gkkp8Cl8

USS Liberty Cover Up - Full Movie- The Loss Of Liberty
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFQrsdj7BLs
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-LITjLrjbEU0/VKBRhor_KiI/AAAAAAAE1FQ/LVeHnyARW0k/w506-h750/1511077_10154172416050005_2522448360988742617_n.jpg
4 days ago - Via Reshared Post - View -
https://plus.google.com/114529371273443966439 H George Tavakoli : On June 8, 1967, 34 American servicemen were killed and 174 were wounded during an Israeli attack on...
On June 8, 1967, 34 American servicemen were killed and 174 were wounded during an Israeli attack on the USS Liberty. According to former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Thomas Moorer, “Those men were then betrayed and left to die by our own government.” The survivors are still awaiting justice.

Rest In Peace

LT James Cecil Pierce, USN, 649805/6462
Born 11 July 1924, Clinton, North Carolina
Active duty since 6 August 1941
Wife: Pauline M. Pierce, Virginia Beach (died later)
Parents: deceased
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
while destroying registered publications
Wife: died soon after.
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, grave 8576R, Section 13

Jerry Leroy Converse, June 11, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Jerry Leroy Converse, USN, 794 79 44
Born 11 June 1943, Puyallup, Washington
Active duty since 1 February 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Melvin Ray Converse, Iowa
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Oak Hill Cemetery, Cherokee, Iowa, Plot Blk 2N, Lot 15, grave 4

Thomas Ray Thornton, February 1, 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Thomas Ray Thornton, USN, 997 97 91
Born 1 Febuary 1944, Springfield, Ohio
Active duty since 27 July 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Ray Thornton, Springfield, Ohio
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
- body recovered later
Buried: Ferncliff Cemetery, Springfield, Ohio.

Francis Brown, May 6, 1947 - June 8, 1967
QM3 Francis Brown, USN, 778 76 70
Born 6 May 1947, Albany, New York
Active duty since 6 August 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wade Brown, Troy, NY
Died on bridge while operating the helm

James Lee Lenau, January 9, 1947 - June 8, 1967
CTSN James Lee Lenau, USN, 997 56 58
Born 9 January 1947, Washington, Missouri
Active duty since 24 September 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Leander J. Lenau, Union, MO
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
in forward typewriter repair shop

Curtis Alan Graves, February 10, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT1 Curtis Alan Graves, USN, 519 58 24
Born 10 February 1943, Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan
Active duty since 22 August 1961
Mother: Florence McCullum Graves, Ft. Lauderdale, FL
Father: deceased
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #3773, Section 67
Remembrance: Memorial display planned for Military and Space Museum,
Frankenmuth, Michigan (dedication summer 1990).
Remembrance: Graves Hall (barracks) in Pensacola, Florida.

PC2 John Clarence Spicher, USN, 473 41 77
Born 15 Febuary 1937, Terentum, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 23 September 1954
Wife: Linda Lee Spicher
7901 Hampton Blvd., Norfolk, Virginia
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John E. Spicher, Brackenridge, PA
Hit with rocket on main deck, died receiving emergency aid
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #11362D, Section 13

John Spicher, February 15, 1937 - June 8, 1967
PC2 John Clarence Spicher, USN, 473 41 77
Born 15 Febuary 1937, Terentum, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 23 September 1954
Wife: Linda Lee Spicher
7901 Hampton Blvd., Norfolk, Virginia
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John E. Spicher, Brackenridge, PA
Hit with rocket on main deck, died receiving emergency aid
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #11362D, Section 13

Philippe Charles Tiedtke, 17 October 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Philippe Charles Tiedtke, USN, 914 32 84
Born 17 October 1944, Santa Cruz, California
Active duty since 2 September 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Arthur L. Tiedtke, Modesto, CA
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Lakewood Memorial Park, Hughson, CA

Robert Burton Eisenberg, 12 October 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Robert Burton Eisenberg, USN, 776 09 35
Born 12 October 1944, St. Paul, Minnesota
Active duty since 3 February 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Benj. Eisenberg, St. Paul, MN
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Duane Marggraf, January 27, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Duane Rowe Marggraf, USN, 773 96 50
Born 27 January 1945, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin
Active duty since 6 July 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Carlton H. Marggraf, Fond du Lac, WI
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Remembrance: Brass Marker initially installed at Lakeside Park,
Fon du Lac, in the 1980s, later vanished to storage in the basement
of a city building. Following protests from local citizens, it was
placed on a wall in the Fon du Lac Court House.

John Caleb Smith, July 13, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT1 John Caleb Smith, Jr., USN, 237 77 94
Born 13 July 1943, Ithaca, New York
Active duty since 30 June 1961
Wife: Sandra Ann Smith, 203 Wood Street, Ithica, NY
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John Caleb Smith, Sr., Ithica, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Jack Lewis Raper, August 28, 1944 - June 8, 1967
SGT Jack Lewis Raper, USMC, 1994072
Born 28 August 1944, Cedartown, Georgia
Active duty since 1 August 1962
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

Philip McCutcheon Armstrong July 4, 1929 - June 8, 1967

LCDR Philip McCutcheon Armstrong, Jr., USN, 569825/1100
Born 4 July 1929, Detroit, Michigan
Active duty since 5 June 1953
US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Class of 1953
Wife: Marie Kearney "Weetie" Armstrong, Virginia Beach, VA
Father: Philip M.C. Armstrong, Detroit, Michigan
Mortally wounded near the bridge attempting to extinguish large fire
Died about 4 hours later in battle dressing station
Received Navy Cross for heroism during battle
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery grave 2096X, Section 3
His wife died in 1988 of cancer.
Remembrance: Memorial display: Hall of Heroes, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland
Memorial display: Military and Space Museum,
Frankenmuth, Michigan, dedicated November, 1990, contains
his Navy Cross, uniform, story of attack, copy of Ennes' book.

Lawrence P. Hayden, June 16, 1947 - June 8, 1967
CTSN Lawrence Paul Hayden, USN, B70 53 70
Born 16 June 1947, Houston, Texas
Active duty since 2 May 1966
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. James H. Hayden, Houston, Texas
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

David Skolak, August 12, 1946 - June 8, 1967
ICFN David NMN Skolak, USN, B50 17 83
Born 12 August 1946, Gary, Indiana
Active duty since 24 January 1966
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Rudolph J. Skolak, Gary, Indiana
Died in forward gun mount returning fire

Richard W. Keene, October 23, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Richard Walter Keene, Jr., USN, 778 82 75
Born 23 October 1945, Batavia, New York
Active duty since 10 November 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Richard W. Keene, Sr., Poughkeepsie, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Carl C. Nygren, May 17, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CTSN Carl Christian Nygren, USN, 788 37 16
Born 17 May 1945, Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 19 August 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Arvid C. Nygren, North Babylon, LI, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

Frederick James Walton, November 28, 1935 - June 8, 1967
CT1 Frederick James Walton, USN, 236 31 86
Born 28 November 1935, Niagara Falls, New York
Active duty since 8 December 1952
Wife: Audry Jane Walton, #3 Deuro Drive, Niagara Falls, NY
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Horace F. Walton, Niagara Falls, NY
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Edward Emory Rehmeyer III, September 25, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CPL Edward Emory Rehmeyer, III, USMC 2120919
Born 25 September 1945, York, Pennsylvania
Parents address 10/93: Mr. & Mrs. Ed Rehmeyer, Jr., Shrewsbury, PA 17361
Active duty since 8 October 1964
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Ronnie Jordon Campbell, November 4, 1942 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Ronnie Jordon Campbell, USN, 586 13 23
Born 4 November 1942, Sevierville, Tennessee
Active duty since 6 September 1961
Wife: Elizabeth E. Campbell
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Raymond C. Campbell, Sevierville, Tennessee
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave 1145C, Section 13
Remembrance: Ronnie Campbell Barracks in Edzell, Scotland

Alan Higgins, January 27, 1948 - June 8, 1967
CT3 Alan (NMN) Higgins, USN, 788 62 97
Born 27 January 1948, Weymouth, Massachusetts
Active duty since 16 September 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wilbur C. Higgins, Dover, Delaware
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #1773, Section 12

Alexander Neil Thompson, Jr., April 5, 1943 - June 8, 1967
GMG3 Alexander Neil Thompson, Jr., USN, 770 47 21
Born 5 April 1943, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 5 September 1963
Wife: Gail E. Thompson, 4 Crystal Drive, Warwick, Rhode Island
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Alexander A. Thompson, Greely, Pennsylvania
Died in forward gun mount
Remembrance: Navy gunnery training building for the Aegis system
named in his memory in 1990.

Jerry Lee Goss, Jr., May 30, 1941 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Jerry Lee Goss, USNR, 773 61 55
Born 30 May 1941, North Vernon, Indiana
Active duty since 29 June 1965
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Harry Herschel Goss, North Vernon, IN
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

James Mahlon Lupton, October 29, 1942 - June 8, 1967
CT1 James Mahlon Lupton, USN, 511 31 28
Born 20 October 1942, Shreveport, Louisiana
Active duty since 26 June 1962
Wife: Barbara Joan Lupton, 25E Sobria Loka, Yalova, Turkey
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Clyde Knot Lupton, Shreveport, LA
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

William Bernard Allenbaugh, January 23, 1944 - June 8, 1967
CT3 William Bernard Allenbaugh, USN, 684 49 96
Born 23 January 1944, Baltimore, Maryland
Active duty since 10 June 1964
Wife: Sandra Lee Allenbaugh, Lothian, Maryland
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Francis Allenbaugh, Baltimore, Maryland
Memorial: Mr. & Mrs. Allenbaugh presented a memorial plaque to
Calvert Hall College, a catholic high school attended by Wm. Allenbaugh,
in his memory.

Untitled Poem - By William B. Allenbaugh, Jr.
This is dedicated to my father, William Bernard Allenbaugh, Sr. killed on the USS LIBERTY, 8 June 1967

Fathers work,
To earn their pay,
To raise their families,
Day by Day.

Fathers console their children,
When they are sad,
They punish their children
When they are bad.

Some families don't have Fathers,
They are killed or die,
Some are in prison,
Others run away and cry.

But without Fathers,
Where would we be,
Probably swimming out farther,
Then drowning, helplessly at sea.

Warren Edward Hersey, October 14, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT1 Warren Edward Hersey, USN, 903 67 11
Born 14 October 1943, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Active duty since 4 April 1961
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Warren O. Hersey, Stoneham, Mass.
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces

Raymond Eugene Linn, June 30, 1928 - June 8, 1967
CTC Raymond Eugene Linn, USN, 571 13 74
Born 30 June 1928, Adamsville, Ohio
Active duty since 25 September 1946
Divorced
Adopted Daughter: Linda Loucille Linn, Zanesville, Ohio
Daughter: Joy (Mrs. Larry R.) Linn Evans, Aurora, Ohio 44202
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave #1724, Section 12
Remembrance: Linn Barracks in Japan
Linn Operations Building in Sugar Grove, West Virginia

Gary Ray Blanchard, September 16, 1946 - June 8, 1967
SN Gary Ray Blanchard, USN, 771 77 22
Born 16 September 1946, Wichita, Kansas
Active duty since 11 February 1964
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Earl T. Blanchard, Wichita, Kansas
Died on operating table 0315 June 9, 1967
Buried: Lakeview Cemetery and Mausoleum, Wichita, Kansas

Anthony Peter Mendle, December, 1945 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Anthony Peter Mendle, USN, 777 62 87
Born 4 December 1945, Waterbury, Connecticut
Active duty since 11 August 1964 or 1965 (dates conflict)
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. John J. Mendle, Glendale, Arizona
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Resthaven Park Cemetary (West), Glendale AZ

David W. Marlborough, September 28, 1948 - June 8, 1967
CTSN David Walter Marlborough, USN, B10 04 80
Born 28 September 1948, Waterville, Maine
Active duty since 26 July 1966
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Wm. M. Marlborough, Springfield, Mass.
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Mass Grave #1817, Section 34

Carl Lewis Hoar, May 29, 1945 - June 8, 1967
SN Carl Lewis Hoar, USN, 774 46 48
(Shown as Carl Lewis Hoar on list sent for Navy Memorial)
(Shown as Carl Louis Hoar on official 1967 final casualty list)
Born 29 May 1945, Mount Vernon, Ohio
Active duty since 29 November 1963
Parents: Mr. and Mrs. James B. Hoar, Mt. Vernon, Ohio
Buried: Mt. Vernon, Ohio

Allen Merle Blue, September 5, 1943 - June 8, 1967
CT2 Allen Merle Blue, USNR-R, 391 18 71
Born 5 September 1943, Yakima, Washington
Active duty USN from 22 SEP 61 to 21 JAN 66
Serving as a civilian for NSA
Parents: Washington State
Wife: Patricia Baccus Blue
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Buried: Arlington National Cemetery, Grave 745, Section 48

Stephen Spencer Toth, September 12, 1939 - June 8, 1967
LT Stephen Spencer Toth, USN, 669613/1100
Born 12 September 1939, San Diego, California
Active duty since 5 June 1963
US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Class of 1963
Wife: Regina Chermont Toth, US Mission to Brazil
Avenida Morambi 3819, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Parents: Capt. & Mrs. Joseph C. Toth, USN, Virginia Beach, VA
Father: deceased - died about 1968.
Died 01 or 02 level, port side, of rocket fire
Received Silver Star for heroism during battle
Memorial display, Hall of Heroes, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland
Buried: U. S. Naval Academy Cemetery, Annapolis, Maryland

Melvin Douglas Smith, February 27, 1938 - June 8, 1967
CTC Melvin Douglas Smith, USN, 493 95 96
Born 27 February 1938, Alamance, North Carolina
Active duty since 4 April 1956
Wife: Judith Ann Smith, 304 Moreno Courts, Warrington, Florida
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Carlton Melvin Smith, Alamance, North Carolina
Died in Naval Security Group (intelligence) Department spaces
Remembrance: Smith Barracks in Florida

In May of 1966 Doug received an assignment to sea duty, and he boarded the USS Liberty on May 31, 1966. The family had moved back to North Carolina, and another son, Tim, was born there. The Liberty docked on February 28, 1967, and Doug rushed home to see his youngest son for the first time.

Doug's death on the Liberty continues to shiver through the lives of those who loved him. His oldest son, Douglas, recently wrote a poem for his father, "Epitaph at Sea with Constellation Above." In the poem, his father disappears, line by line, from the world:

Mariner, descend, and the sea conceal
bird and sky and the drowned father below,
who shall not sing, who shall not rise, but dwells
among the abandoned gods, a body
unfolding dark, restless and fathoms deep.
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Join the memorial service for the USS Liberty victims on June 8, 2013 at noon at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery.
Please call for an investigation to help bring closure to the sailors and their families who have suffered and felt betrayed by their country for 45 years.

Please read some of the articles about the USS Liberty published by the Washington Reportover the past 30 years. On Jan. 12, 2004 the U.S. State Department held a highly charged panel discussion on the attack, and prevented survivors and military experts who played a role in the tragedy from speaking (see Washington Report, March 2004, pages 9-11,http://www.wrmea.org/archives/259-washington-report-archives-2000-2005/march-2004/5019-those-not-invited-to-speak-steal-the-show-at-state-department-liberty-discussion.html.
It’s past time for a serious discussion with USS Liberty survivors and other experts. It is the least these unsung heroes—and all Americans—deserve.
https://www.facebook.com/events/186293598165055/
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A former Navy attorney who helped lead the military investigation of the 1967 Israeli attack on the USS Liberty that killed 34 American servicemen says former President Lyndon Johnson and his defense secretary, Robert McNamara, ordered that the inquiry conclude the incident was an accident.

In a signed affidavit released at a Capitol Hill news conference, retired Capt. Ward Boston said Johnson and McNamara told those heading the Navy's inquiry to "conclude that the attack was a case of 'mistaken identity' despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary."

It was “one of the classic all-American cover-ups,” said retired Admiral Thomas Moorer, a former Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman who spent a year investigating the attack as part of an independent panel he formed with other former military officials. The panel also included a former US ambassador to Saudi Arabia, James Akins.

Torpedo hole in USS Liberty

“Why would our government put Israel’s interests ahead of our own?” Moorer asked from his wheelchair at the news conference. He was chief of naval operations at the time of the attack.

Moorer, who has long held that the attack was a deliberate act, wants Congress to investigate. [Newsday]

Israel claims the USS Liberty was mistaken for the out-of-service Egyptian horse carrier El Quseir. Giddy up!

Fifteen years after the attack, an Israeli pilot approached Liberty survivors and then held extensive interviews with former Congressman Paul N. (Pete) McCloskey about his role. According to this senior Israeli lead pilot, he recognized the Liberty as American immediately, so informed his headquarters, and was told to ignore the American flag and continue his attack. He refused to do so and returned to base, where he was arrested.

Later, a dual-citizen Israeli major told survivors that he was in an Israeli war room where he heard that pilot's radio report. The attacking pilots and everyone in the Israeli war room knew that they were attacking an American ship, the major said. He recanted the statement only after he received threatening phone calls from Israel.

The pilot's protests also were heard by radio monitors in the U.S. Embassy in Lebanon. Then-U.S. Ambassador to Lebanon Dwight Porter has confirmed this. Porter told his story to syndicated columnists Rowland Evans and Robert Novak and offered to submit to further questioning by authorities. Unfortunately, no one in the U.S. government has any interest in hearing these first-person accounts of Israeli treachery. [Washington Report]

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"Then, inexplicably, at 2 p.m., unmarked Israeli aircraft began attacking the ship." [Ledger Enquirer]

Israel attacked the USS Liberty using UNMARKED AIRCRAFT. This is the single fact which proves Israel knew exactly who they were attacking. Israel's story is that they thought USS Liberty was an Egyptian ship and therefore a legitimate target of war. Were that true, there would be no reason to attack a supposedly Egyptian ship with unmarked aircraft. The only possible reason to use unmarked aircraft to attack the ship is that Israel knew it was an American ship and intended to sink it, then to blame the attack on Egypt.

Moorer, who as top legal council to the official investigation is in a position to know, agrees that Israel intended to sink the USS Liberty and blame Egypt for it, thus dragging the United States into a war on Israel's behalf. This seems to be a common trick of Israel. Starting with the Lavon affair, through the USS Liberty, to the fake radio transmitter that tricked Reagan into attacking Libya, to potentially 9-11 itself, Israel's game is to frame Arabs and set them up as targets for the United States.

The official US investigation is discredited. And with it, every claim of innocence for Israel that relied on the official investigation as a source.

The real question facing the American people is why the US Government seems more concerned with protecting Israel after they are caught playing these dirty tricks, rather than doing something to convince Israel not to kill any more Americans.

"Evidence linking these Israelis to 9/11 is classified. I cannot tell you about evidence that has been gathered. It's classified information." -- US official quoted in Carl Cameron's Fox News report on the Israeli spy ring and its connections to 9-11.

Dead In The Water - The Sinking of the USS Liberty
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iy2gkkp8Cl8

USS Liberty Cover Up - Full Movie- The Loss Of Liberty
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFQrsdj7BLs
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Carl Lewis. #LaFraseGroup
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https://plus.google.com/115670604559091467108 Carl Lewis : I was convinced by someone to change this story so here we go. Story: I'm constantly being bullied for...
I was convinced by someone to change this story so here we go. Story: I'm constantly being bullied for my looks in school for ,i have half given up the will to even have a education, i don't even want to go to school anymore. im sending this to all my bullies every time i get a share. Please if your against me being ugly please share. I don't think I'm ugly. Do you? 
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-JIiIxHICbVQ/U1F_EpduZBI/AAAAAAAADbQ/bqlPctv4cWY/w506-h750/14%2B-%2B1
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https://plus.google.com/108627078716413515705 BrightStar Radio Fun 101 : Thursday July 16, 2015 National Corn Fritter Day Reminder-Lowell Farmer's Market is open today from...
Thursday July 16, 2015 National Corn Fritter Day

Reminder-Lowell Farmer's Market is open today from 4-7pm located in downtown Lowell.

BrightStar Radio would like to wish our following listeners a Happy Birthday
Tom McLain and Hal Ray of Mt. Holly and Eric Mullis of Stanley.

Celebrity Birthdays today are:
Popcorn entrepreneur-Orville Redenbacher,
Previous Head Coach of Dallas Cowboys Jimmy Johnson
Actor Will Ferrell

Today in History:
1935: 1st automatic Parking meter installed in the US
1936: 1st X-ray photo of arterial circulation
1969: Apollo 11 was launched, carrying the first men to land on the moon
1988: Carl Lewis runs mens 100m in 9.78 seconds
1988: Florence Joyner runs womens 100m in 10.49 seconds
1999: John F. Kennedy Jr., wife Carolyn and sister-in-law Lauren Bassette were killed in a plane crash off the coast of Martha's Vineyard
12 days ago - Via - View -
https://plus.google.com/110156550327235175086 Nah kar : Mike Powell and Carl Lewis World Record Long Jump Competition Amazing
Mike Powell and Carl Lewis World Record Long Jump Competition Amazing

Mike Powell and Carl Lewis World Record Long Jump Competition Amazing | NahKar
Omg What happened in the Train This was breathtaking. Watch in the video What Happened in the Train with these Women as they were travelling... World Top 10 People Who Survived The Impossible · In the battle of idiot vs. bull, bull always wins. Good job, bull. Flaming-horns Bull VS Idiot ...
12 days ago - Via Google+ - View -
https://plus.google.com/106967865401462167552 Pagina Nuova : 1992 Summer Olympics Track & Field M4x100M: USA Carl Lewis in action raising his hands in celebration...
1992 Summer Olympics Track & Field M4x100M: USA Carl Lewis in action raising his hands in celebration after winning gold medal & setting new world record in event at 37.40.
Barcelona 08/08/92
Credit: Bill Frakes
13 days ago - Via Photos - View -
https://plus.google.com/111764350095430654131 Carl Lewis : Thank You
Thank You
Watch the video: Thank You
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