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Most recent 100 results returned for keyword: Ashton Gate (Search this on MAP)

Flickr 47150 Ashton Gate Bristol May 1984 a
Tags: bristol   47   billygraham   class47   ashtongate   47150   

Recent Updated: 3 months ago - Created by Bristol RE - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Bristol RE
Flickr Ashton Gate
Tags: bristolcity   ashtongate   vision:outdoor=099   vision:sky=0884   
Ashton Gate home of Bristol City Football Club
Recent Updated: 4 months ago - Created by goldenbolt - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - goldenbolt
Flickr 51218 Ashton Gate Junction
Tags: cliftonsuspensionbridge   51218   vision:mountain=0697   vision:sky=0601   vision:outdoor=0975   ashtongatejunctionpug   
A little later and we had reached our destination of Ashton Gate Junction which allowed the Clifton Suspension Bridge and the large bonded warehouse as a backdrop, 28 February 1998.
Recent Updated: 5 months ago - Created by terry.eyres - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - terry.eyres
Flickr 51218 Ashton Gate Swing Bridge
Tags: 51218   vision:text=0505   vision:outdoor=0697   ashtongatebridgepug   
Just over sixteen years ago L&Y "Pug" 51218 is about the cross the Ashton Gate Swing Bridge with a short goods on the Bristol Harbour Railway during a Geoff Silcock charter on the last day of February 1998, no tracks any more down here nowadays though.
Recent Updated: 5 months ago - Created by terry.eyres - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - terry.eyres
Flickr Ashton Gate Halt, Bristol BS3
Tags: greatwesternrailway   portisheadrailway   ashtongaterailwaystation   bristolbs3   vision:outdoor=099   vision:ocean=0511   ashtongatehaltbristolbs3   
Ashton Gate railway station was a railway station serving the Ashton Gate area of Bristol, England, which included Ashton Gate football ground, the home ground of Bristol City F.C.. It was located on the Portishead Railway.

Opened by the Great Western Railway, the station closed due to economies during the First World War. It then passed on to the Western Region of British Railways on nationalisation in 1948. It was then closed by the British Railways Board in 1964, then briefly reopened for traffic to the football ground until 1977, and temporarily re-opened in May 1984 to serve Mission England, a series of evangelical rallies by Billy Graham at the football ground.

The line through the former station still exists but in spite of attempts at passenger re-opening carries only freight for the Royal Portbury Dock.

The Portishead Branch Line through Ashton Gate is due to be reopened as part of the Greater Bristol Metro, a rail transport plan which aims to enhance transport capacity in the Bristol area. The scheme could see the reopening of Ashton Gate, with an aspiration of two trains per hour in peak periods.

Recent Updated: 5 months ago - Created by brizzle born and bred - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - brizzle born and bred
Flickr 11th July 1968, floods at Ashton Gate, Bristol
Tags: thegreatfloodof68   vision:outdoor=099   vision:sky=0578   11thjuly1968floodsatashtongatebristol   
This was the scene in the low-lying area of Ashton and Bedminster after more than 4 inches of rain fell on almost the whole of Bristol on the night of 10th July 1968: in some roads the water rose to bedroom level.

www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/2052484290/

Recent Updated: 5 months ago - Created by brizzle born and bred - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - brizzle born and bred
Flickr E. Luton & Son, 226 North Street, Ashton Gate, Bristol
Tags: haroldking   vision:outdoor=0887   vision:sky=0645   elutonson226northstreetashtongatebristol   confectionerybakers   
Old undated photograph with brief information on the back, stating, Mr Harold King, the first driver of motorised transport for Mr E Luton. In the early 1900’s Luton’s Bakers were the fastest growing confectionery bakers in Bristol.

"Can anyone give me further information please"

Luton E. & Son Ltd. (bakers) 415, Gloucester Road, Bristol

www.flickr.com/photos/20654194@N07/10230873184/

Recent Updated: 6 months ago - Created by brizzle born and bred - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - brizzle born and bred
Flickr Ashton Gate Signal Box Dec 1980
Tags: bristol   signalbox   levelcrossing   ashtongate   strachanandhenshaw   gwrsignalbox   ashtonjunction   vision:text=0567   vision:outdoor=095   timberbuiltsignalbox   

Recent Updated: 8 months ago - Created by millydonner - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - millydonner
Flickr Ashton Gate
Tags: bristol   oldhamathletic   bristolmuseum   bristolcity   latics   ashtongate   vision:text=0598   
So this is what it looks like from seats with backs and no pillar to spoil the view!
Original picture in Bristol Museum.

Recent Updated: 9 months ago - Created by Diego Sideburns - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Diego Sideburns
Flickr Ballonatics
Tags: hot   festival   bristol   basket   air   balloon   cameron   ashtongate   massascent   pentaxk5   
This looks like it was a close shave, these balloons almost collided.
Recent Updated: 1 year ago - Created by ORIONSM - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - ORIONSM
Flickr The Great Flood of 68 - Ashton Gate, Bristol
Tags: ukweatherarchives   thegreatfloodof68ashtongatebristol   
Ashton Gate 1968
Recent Updated: 1 year ago - Created by brizzle born and bred - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - brizzle born and bred
Flickr 47150, Ashton Gate, 1984.
Tags: bristol   brush   47   sulzer   class47   type4   ashtongate   47150   
47150 is seen at Ashton Gate, whilst involved with the working of Billy Graham specials, 1984.
Recent Updated: 1 year ago - Created by Bristol RE - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Bristol RE
Flickr 47150 leaving Ashton Gate, 1984.
Tags: bristol   brush   47   sulzer   class47   type4   ashtongate   47150   
47150 is seen here leaving the temporarily-reopened Ashton Gate platform with the ECS of a Billy Graham special.
Recent Updated: 1 year ago - Created by Bristol RE - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Bristol RE
Flickr Bristol International Exhibition 1914 - Ashton Gate
Tags: ashtongate   bristolinternationalexhibition1914   
Popularly known as the 'White City' it was held at Aston Gate and it was open from June 29th until August 15th. As soon as the exhibition ended the War Office took over and the Halls were used as barracks for the new recruits. The Exhibition had a variety of events, the most spectacular being the Grand Pageant of Bristol. There were also Concert Parties, sports events, lectures and numerous other displays.

The exhibition consisted of English buildings through the ages, plus the large white pavilion shown above.

It was held in Ashton Meadows now the riverside land beneath and around Brunel Way next the River Avon. The new use of early flood lighting, was supplied by Christy Brothers electric generators at Kennel Farm.

Recent Updated: 1 year ago - Created by brizzle born and bred - View

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Flickr
Tags: uk   digital   bristol   ojo   2012   clour   apertura   ontheroadagain   soluz   sinsal   urbanoide   loadunload   1050472sml   builtforbristolmotorcoltdin1928   oldmercedesshowroomswinterstokeroadashtongatebristolbs3   
Bristol, UK 2012
Recent Updated: 1 year ago - Created by ojofoto - View

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Flickr Toll House Court, Ashton Gate, Bristol
Tags: bristol   bedminster   ashtongate   guesswhereuk   gwuk   tollhousecourt   secondstephousing   guessedbyjanetg48   
[originally uploaded for the flickr group Guess Where UK]
Recent Updated: 1 year ago - Created by ChurchCrawler - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - ChurchCrawler
Flickr ASHTON GATE STATION
Tags: portbury   ashtongatestation   severnsider   
We came to a halt at the old Ashton Gate station allowing me to take this shot of the old platform by holding my camera out the hopper window at my seat. It's been a long time since a train stopped here for football supporters to attend a game at the Bristol City ground nearby!
Recent Updated: 1 year ago - Created by JAYBEE+1958 - View

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Flickr Bristol City sign two new strikers
Tags: football   1978   strikers   johnshaw   ashtongate   bristolcityfc   performingseals   allandicks   kevinmabbutt   trevortainton   
1978 Ashton Gate - Bristol City football manager Allan Dicks (left) Kevin Mabbutt, John Shaw and Trevor Tainton, look on in amazement, at the ball skills of these performing seals.

Alan Dicks (born 29 August 1934) is a retired English footballer and football manager. He managed Bristol City for thirteen years and managed clubs in five countries on three continents.

Born in London, he signed for Chelsea at the age of 17, though his playing time in the first team was limited to 35 matches in six years, during this time he completed his 2 years national service with the R.A.F and so only played one game in Chelsea's 1954-55 championship season.

In 1958 he moved to Southend United, and in 1962 joined Coventry City as Assistant Manager/Coach under Jimmy Hill.

In 1967 Hill recommended him for the vacant manager's job at Bristol City. He took the job at the age of just 33, and held it for thirteen years. In that time he consolidated City's position in the Second Division, and eventually, in 1976, led them to promotion to the First Division - then English football's top flight.

Dicks remained as manager throughout City's four-year stay in Division 1, but relegation and a poor start to the following season saw him leave in October 1980. Subsequently, City suffered three relegations in as many years.

During the 1980s, Dicks managed clubs in Greece, Cyprus and Qatar (where he won the championship with Al Rayyan Sports Club).

He managed Fulham Football Club for one season in the early 1990s before he was sacked.

After leaving Fulham he moved to the United States and subsequently became head coach of Carolina Dynamo and then Charleston Battery in the A-League. He has now retired and returned to Bristol.

Kevin Mabbutt (born 5 December 1958 in Bristol) is a retired English-born football player who played for Bristol City and Crystal Palace in the Football League.

He played over 100 league games for Bristol City, before joining Crystal Palace in October 1981. He was their top scorer that season, with eight goals, and helped them avoid a second successive relegation.

His father is Ray Mabbutt and his brother is Gary Mabbutt.

As of 2005 he owns a restaurant in Los Angeles.

EXACTLY 30 years ago today Bristol City striker Kevin Mabbutt completed an extraordinary feat by becoming only the second player in Football League history to score a hat-trick against Manchester United at Old Trafford.

Bristol-born Mabbutt relocated to the United States in 1990 where he now lives with his wife and three daughters in Rancho Santa Fe, an upmarket suburb of San Diego. Yet despite his American accent, a West Country lilt is still evident as he recounted that unforgettable 3-1 victory when he was still only 19.

He recalled: "Going to Manchester United to play for the first time is every young player's dream and I was extremely excited; especially during the coach journey to Old Trafford.

"Even though I'd been playing in the First Division for over a year back then, playing at one of the greatest stadiums in the world, with United's fans and reputation, was a privilege and an honour."

Despite a bright opening to the 1978-79 campaign, City went into this fixture on the back of two consecutive defeats and neither Mabbutt nor his strike partner, Joe Royle, had found the net that term.

"Joe was really the main man up there and I was working off of him" he said.

"But what's interesting is that we hadn't started the season well, as far as scoring, and yet we went there and between us we ripped United apart pretty much.

"In fact, the team played fantastically that day and Trevor (Tainton),Gowey (Gerry Gow) and Jimmy (Mann) in particular kept winning the ball in midfield and controlled the game."

But what about those goals? "What I remember was the confident way I took them all," he said.

"For the first one, Joe knocked it on and I'd beaten my defender, Martin Buchan, to the ball with an early run, and their keeper was in front of me and instead of taking it on another step or two into the box, I just hammered it into the roof of the net."

Mabbutt remembers each of his goals that way; the rush of adrenaline after anticipating the flight of Royle's passes, followed by split-second timing to out sprint his marker, crowned by a confident finish

Following the opener on 11 minutes, Royle continued to give his marker Gordon McQueen a torrid time, out-jumping the big Scottish international to set up Mabbutt's second.

United fought back, but City keeper John Shaw saved brilliantly from a Jimmy Greenhoff penalty.

And despite the United striker chesting home shortly after, the Robins added a third two minutes from time.

Royle challenged United keeper Paddy Roche following a swift City counter attack and cushioned the ball for Mabbutt to complete his hat-trick and join an elite band which now numbers four: Kevin, Dennis Bailey, Martin Peters and Ronaldo.

After such a momentous victory, surely a celebration was called for? "There weren't any special celebrations," reflects Mabbutt, "but I remember sitting in the changing rooms afterwards and feeling very humble and trying to get my head round it."

Mabbutt recalls one of the most memorable moments as being when the match ball was passed around the United team, some of whom refused to sign it.

"I remember having the ball and being on the bus on the way back, and you know it kind of being a prized possession. I think my father still has it."

John Shaw BRISTOL City FC had a tough time in the Eighties. Not only was the club declared bankrupt in 1982, they also fell into the old Division Four after becoming the first English football team ever to suffer three successive relegations.

Many claim the traumas took their toll on goalie John Shaw, who lost his hair, eyebrows and eyelashes to alopecia.

Trevor Keith Tainton (born 8 June 1948) is a former footballer who played as a midfielder in the Football League between the 1960s and 1980s for Bristol City.

He was born in Bristol and first appeared for Bristol City in the 1967–68 season and he went on to play 486 League games for the Ashton Gate side. He was a member of the successful promotion side of 1976, and went on to play for City in the First Division.

During the 1981/82 season Tainton joined Torquay United, scoring one goal in 19 league appearances that season before moving to Trowbridge Town.

After retiring from football he worked as a security officer at the Oldbury Nuclear Power Station.

2011@Image copyright protected. All rights reserved

Recent Updated: 2 years ago - Created by brizzle born and bred - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - brizzle born and bred
Flickr 1911 - The Living Union Jack - Bristol
Tags: 1911   ashtongate   georgevcoronation   historicalpageant   livingunionjack   
The Living Union Jack. 5,000 Bristol School children take part in this unique Historical Pageant at Ashton Gate to mark the Coronation of King George V.

George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions, and Emperor of India, from 6 May 1910 through the First World War (1914–1918) until his death in 1936.

George was a grandson of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert and the first cousin of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany. From 1877 until 1891 he served in the Royal Navy. On the death of Victoria in 1901, George's father became King Edward VII, and George was made Prince of Wales. On his father's death in 1910, he succeeded as King-Emperor of the British Empire. He was the only Emperor of India to be present at his own Delhi Durbar.

As a result of the First World War, other empires in Europe fell while his expanded to its greatest extent. In 1917, he became the first monarch of the House of Windsor, which he renamed from the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha as a result of anti-German public sentiment. His reign saw the rise of socialism, communism, fascism, Irish republicanism, and the Indian independence movement, all of which radically changed the political landscape.

The Parliament Act 1911 established the supremacy of the elected House of Commons of the United Kingdom over the unelected House of Lords. He appointed the first Labour ministry in 1924 and in 1931, the Statute of Westminster recognised the dominions of the empire as separate, independent kingdoms within the Commonwealth of Nations. He was plagued by illness throughout much of his later reign and at his death was succeeded by his eldest son, Edward VIII.

Events United Kingdom 1911

3 January - In London, in what becomes known as the Siege of Sidney Street, the Metropolitan Police and the Scots Guards engage in a shootout with a criminal gang of Latvian anarchists holed up in a building in the East End.

March–April - Eleven thousand workers at the Singer Manufacturing Co. sewing machine factory on Clydebank in Scotland go on strike in solidarity with twelve female colleagues protesting against work process reorganisation. Four hundred alleged ringleaders are dismissed.

2 April - The 1911 census is taken. One out of every seven employed persons is a domestic servant.

4 April - Work begins on construction of Castle Drogo, Devon, to the design of Edwin Lutyens.

12 May - Festival of Empire opens at The Crystal Palace, London, to celebrate the Coronation.

31 May - Launching of the ocean liner RMS Titanic in Belfast. Her sister RMS Olympic sails for Liverpool the same day to take up transatlantic service.

14 June - Liverpool General Transport Strike begins.

22 June Coronation of King George V and Queen Mary at Westminster Abbey, London.

Completion of the Royal Liver Building, Liverpool, is marked by starting the clocks in its towers at the same moment as the Coronation.

July–September - Severe heat wave and associated drought.

13 July - The future Edward VIII is invested as Prince of Wales in a ceremony at Carnarvon Castle devised by David Lloyd George.

9 August - Raunds, Northamptonshire, records a temperature of 98°F (36.7°C), the highest UK temperature until 1990.

10 August - British MPs vote to receive salaries for the first time.

13 August - The centre of Liverpool is rocked by violence when a meeting of striking transport workers is broken up by police and soldiers. A number of policemen and many strikers are seriously injured in what would become known as 'Bloody Sunday.'

17 August - During a railway strike in Llanelli, two men are shot dead by the Army.

18 August - Official Secrets Act 1911 passed.

9–26 September - World's first scheduled airmail post service is flown between Hendon, North London, and Windsor, Berkshire.

20 September - The liner RMS Olympic, sister ship to the Titanic, collides with Royal Navy cruiser HMS Hawke off Southampton.

4 October - First electric escalators introduced, at Earl's Court tube station.

6 October - The British Seafarers' Union is formed in Southampton.

8 November - Newcastle upon Tyne: the first rugby league football Test of the 1911–12 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain is played between Australasia and Great Britain.

21 November - Suffragettes storm Parliament in London. All are arrested and choose prison terms.

24 November - An explosion on the eleventh floor of Bibby's Oil cake mill in Liverpool leaves five dead and almost one hundred injured.

11 December - King George V and Queen Mary are crowned as Emperor of India and Empress consort, respectively, in New Delhi.

Recent Updated: 2 years ago - Created by brizzle born and bred - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - brizzle born and bred
Flickr Ashton Gate panoramic
Tags: city   bristol   football   stadium   ashtongate   
Using photosynth for the iPhone
Recent Updated: 2 years ago - Created by Andrew_Parsons - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Andrew_Parsons
Flickr Nelson Mandela House, Ashton Gate BS3
Tags: bs3   onlyfoolsandhorses   ashtongate   whitemeadhouse   nelsonmandelahouse   
Nelson Mandela House, Ashton Gate (AKA Whitemead House) Bristol BS3.

The block of flats on the left appeared as the 'Nelson Mandela House' in the TV classic 'Only Fools and Horses', between 1988-2003. Previously 'The Harlech Towers' in London were used (1981-1985 - see bottom link).

The red building you can see is the back of Ashton Gate (home to Bristol City), the car park was also used in some scenes.

www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/2049221759/

news.bbc.co.uk/local/bristol/hi/people_and_places/arts_an...

Recent Updated: 2 years ago - Created by brizzle born and bred - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - brizzle born and bred
Flickr Ashton Gate station, 2010
Tags: bristol   railway   railwaystation   gwr   ashtongate   portisheadline   
The Portishead Branch began at Parson Street Junction (ST576705, MLN1 120 26), then curved round to the north and ran through the Ashtons – Ashton Vale, Ashton Gate and Bower Ashton, to this, Ashton Gate Platform, the first station on the line at ST565715 (POD 121 30). The station opened 1.10.1906 for the public, but closed 1.11.1917 as a wartime austerity measure. Reopened and rebuilt on 23.5.1926, it closed again with the service to Portishead 7.9.1964, but was retained for special excursion trains to Ashton Gate stadium for football and the 1984 visit of Billy Graham. A spur to the right was that of the Wapping Wharf Branch – see my 'Bristol Harbour Railways' photoset. This is Ashton Gate station, site of, 2010 style, with only the platform edges visible and distant bridge. The junction for the line to the docks was severed in 2001 and has now been built over – more poncey bloody flats!
Recent Updated: 3 years ago - Created by Midland Explorer Boy - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Midland Explorer Boy
Flickr 70004; Ashton Gate, 09/08/10
Tags: bristol   freightliner   70004   ashtongatestation   portburybranch   
Freightliner 70004 pulling away from a signal stop at Ashton Gate Station on the Portbury Branch, Bristol.

A loaded coal train from Portbury Docks.

Recent Updated: 4 years ago - Created by Woolwinder - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Woolwinder
Flickr 70003; Ashton Gate; 04 Aug. 2010
Tags: bristol   freightliner   70003   ashtongatestation   portburybranch   
Freightliner 70003 approaching Ashton Gate Station with a loaded coal train from Portbury Docks and preparing to stop at the signal located at the eastern end of the defunct platforms.
Recent Updated: 4 years ago - Created by Woolwinder - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Woolwinder
Flickr 1958 Ashton Gate Railway Station
Tags: 1958   ukrailways   ashtongaterailwaystation   ukrailwayarchives   
A photograph of the Great Western Railway station at Ashton Gate.

Looking north in August 1958.

Recent Updated: 4 years ago - Created by brizzle born and bred - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - brizzle born and bred
Flickr Alone
Tags: red   lines   car   bristol   evening   hotair   balloon   angles   aerial   bedminster   carpark   ashtongate   
This is the carpark at Asda in Bedminster, Bristol, captured from a hot air balloon. The impact of the photo arises from the solitary car, its location in the frame and its colour.
Recent Updated: 5 years ago - Created by snowyturner - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - snowyturner
Flickr Inflation
Tags: hot   colour   balloons   bristol   bath   fiesta   air   august   avon   ascent   inflation   ashtongate   
Thought I’d add some colour to the top of my photostream. These inflating balloons were captured at the Bristol Balloon Fiesta a few years ago. The fiesta runs during the second weekend in August but the balloon ascent is frequently called off owing to the “typical” British weather. Thanks for viewing.
Recent Updated: 5 years ago - Created by snowyturner - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - snowyturner
Flickr A38 Ashton Gate underpass
Tags: streetart   bristol   underpass   geotagged   graffiti   urbanart   avon   a38   bs3   ashtongate   ashtongateunderpass   geo:lat=51441008   geo:lon=2625904   
See where this picture was taken. [?]
Recent Updated: 5 years ago - Created by ricksphotos101 - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - ricksphotos101
Flickr Bristol City V Gloucester City
Tags: bristol   football   bristolcity   ashtongate   bristolcityfootballclub   libby29   
A close game for Bristol City!!

Gloucestershire Senior Challenge Cup Final 2009.
Wednesday 6th May 2009, Ashton Gate Stadium
Final Score Bristol City 5 - 1 Gloucester City

Recent Updated: 5 years ago - Created by LG/BS4 - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - LG/BS4
Flickr Ashton Gate, Bristol
Tags: bristol   football   championship   bristolcity   ashtongate   ipswichtownfc   bristolcityfc   kevinlisbie   bristolcity1ipswich1   connorwickham   cahmpionshipfootball   

Recent Updated: 5 years ago - Created by J Markwell - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - J Markwell
Flickr 66596; Ashton Gate Station. 06 March 2009
Tags: bristol   freightliner   66596   ashtongatestation   portburybranch   
Freightliner 66596, stopped at signals in the disused and defunct Ashton Gate Station, exiting the Portbury Branch with a loaded coal train from Portbury Docks. Destination unknown.

The driver is contacting Bristol's main signal box for permission to proceed.

Recent Updated: 5 years ago - Created by Woolwinder - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Woolwinder
Flickr 66596; Ashton Gate Station. 06 March 2009
Tags: bristol   freightliner   66596   ashtongatestation   portburybranch   
Stopped southbound on the Portbury Branch, at the disused Ashton Gate Station, awaiting permission to proceed towards Bristol Temple Meads.
Recent Updated: 5 years ago - Created by Woolwinder - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Woolwinder
Flickr Bon Jovi - Ashton Gate Stadium, Bristol
Tags: bristol   bonjovi   richiesambora   davidbryan   ticotorres   hughmcdonald   lorenzaponce   ashtongatestadium   

Recent Updated: 6 years ago - Created by Matthew Fox - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Matthew Fox
Flickr Bon Jovi, Ashton Gate
Tags: music   concert   bonjovi   richiesambora   ashtongate   bongiovi   

Recent Updated: 6 years ago - Created by Matthew Fox - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Matthew Fox
Flickr Bon Jovi - Ashton Gate Stadium, Bristol
Tags: bristol   bonjovi   richiesambora   davidbryan   ticotorres   hughmcdonald   lorenzaponce   ashtongatestadium   

Recent Updated: 6 years ago - Created by Matthew Fox - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Matthew Fox
Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
Tags: bristol   bonjovi   ashtongate   allaboutbonjovi   
Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
Recent Updated: 6 years ago - Created by Sneaky Snapper - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Sneaky Snapper
Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
Tags: bristol   bonjovi   ashtongate   allaboutbonjovi   
Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
Recent Updated: 6 years ago - Created by Sneaky Snapper - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Sneaky Snapper
Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
Tags: bristol   bonjovi   ashtongate   allaboutbonjovi   
Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
Recent Updated: 6 years ago - Created by Sneaky Snapper - View

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Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
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Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
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Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
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Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
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Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
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Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
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Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
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Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
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Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
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Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
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Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
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Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
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Flickr Bon Jovi, Ashton Gate
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Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
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Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
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Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
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Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
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Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
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Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
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Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
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Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
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Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
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Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
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Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
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Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
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Flickr Bon Jovi, Ashton Gate
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Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
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Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
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Flickr Bon Jovi - Ashton Gate Stadium, Bristol
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Flickr Bon Jovi - Ashton Gate Stadium, Bristol
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Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
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Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
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Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
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Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
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Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
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Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
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Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
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Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
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Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
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Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
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Flickr Bristol - Bon Jovi at Ashton Gate
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Rock band Bon Jovi came to Bristol on Wednesday and played to a capacity crowd at Ashton Gate Football Club.
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Flickr Bristol City Vs PNE- Ashton Gate entrance
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Entrance to Ashton Gate
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Flickr Ashton Gate Underpass Graffiti
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Graffiti along the old railway leading towards and along Avon Gorge.
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Flickr Ashton Gate
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Flickr Ashton Gate
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The Blackthorn Ateyo stand at Bristol City Football Club.
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Flickr Jacob's Urban Ladder...
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Vivitar Ultra Wide & Slim + Redscaled Expired Kodak Gold 200.

Thanks to .danimal, I've learned how to redscale film, the results are rather dramatic but worthwhile from time to time I think!

Basically it involves taking a roll of ordinary 'bog standard' print film, reversing it and respooling it into another film cannister (all done in a dark bag) so that the light is exposed on 'the wrong side of the film' when you take a shot. You then lose two 'stops' on the optimal exposure conditions from the original. It gets developed in exactly the same way as print film, but be prepared for the technician to be a little startled (at best) or a little irritated (at worst) when they realise that something very odd has happened to the film. :)

A flickr-walk with: archidave, Bingo Little, .danimal, *Hairbear & knautia, during a gloriously sunny day to and from Ashton Court via Greville Smyth Park, the Cumberland Basin and back again!

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Flickr Braby & Co.Ltd Ashton Gate, Bristol
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2011 - Metal factory set to be sold

ONCE known as Frederick Braby and Co.Ltd. of Ashton, Braby Ltd. always claimed to be UK pioneers in the making of aluminium sheet metal products in 1893.

If true, it means that Bristol had two firsts in the manufacture of metal products – the other being zinc, pioneered in Old Market and Warmley, and ending finally in Avonmouth.

Britannia Zinc closed its factory there in 2003 and now Braby's, which has been a major south Bristol employer since 1839, has gone into administration.

This well-respected company – a leader in its field – made aluminium and stainless steel silos, tanks and specialist storage for many top names in the food, plastics, chemical and pharmaceutical industries.

In 2005 the firm, then owned by a Danish company, was taken over in a management buy-out led by former MD John Lee.

The 53-strong workforce knew that the firm was facing serious problems and matters came to a head just recently when a deal to sell the company fell through.

Now half the employees have been made redundant and the firm, which has been making aluminium grain silos and storage tanks since the 1950s, is in the hands of the receivers.

"Despite being a long-established business and the UK market leader in its field, Braby Ltd was not immune to the global recession which has led to its customer base reducing its spend on large capital items, such as those supplied by the company," said a spokesman.

"The directors had been in discussions with a large European group which it was hoped would provide strategic finance into Braby and secure its future. Unfortunately, these discussions came to an end last week and as the business was unable to meet its financial commitments, the directors made the difficult decision to appoint administrators.

"We hope to be able to keep the business trading in the short term, enabling us to maintain goodwill and eventually to sell it as a going concern."

The company's last major job was supplying a huge storage silo to GlaxoSmithKline's for its Ribena soft drinks factory at Coleford, in the Forest of Dean.

If closure happens then it would be a huge blow for South Bristol – and specifically Ashton – which has seen its manufacturing base shrink dramatically over the past 20 or 30 years.

The departure of the labour intensive tobacco, printing and packaging industries leaves just Thomas Ware leather and the revived Ashton Gate brewery (formerly "Sunrise") as reminders of just how much has been lost.

According to an advert from the late 1950s Braby's, who also made aluminium trays, buckets (or skeps) and kitchen waste containers as well as silos, once had manufacturing units and depots in London, Liverpool, Glasgow, Falkirk and Motherwell.

"It seems likely that the biggest use of aluminium will eventually be the building industry and in the US whole skyscrapers are being clad in this metal and fitted with aluminium windows, doors, partitions and other internal fittings," said their 1950s promotional material.

"Both our Bristol and Glasgow works are actively engaged in this field and offer a wide range of standardised and purpose built building products."

Obviously proud to be an early maker of aluminium industrial hollow ware – tanks and vessels, welded steel tanks, structural steelwork and metal plate work – Braby were also on the look out for new uses and new markets.

"A little publicised industry is the breeding of animals under laboratory conditions for medical research and at Ashton Gate we also manufacture "residential flats" for mice, rats and guinea pigs in anodised aluminium," said the company.

"But despite these unconventional uses it is still the everyday equipment – tanks, pipe work, ducting, trays and boxes – which form the real bread and butter of our sheet metal industry. Aluminium might be finding new competition from stainless steel and plastic materials but is more than holding its own in a world where there is still an unsatisfied demand for ingot and semi fabricated light alloys.

"Our Circular Corrugated Outdoor Grain Silos, introduced in 1953, are selling well both at home and in a wide export market," said Braby.

With capacities ranging from 20 to 100 tons, these silos were sent to buyers in a pre fabricated format ready to be erected on the spot by a couple of men over one to three days.

"These silos are helping to meet a worldwide need for decentralised grain storage, something brought about by the ever increasing use of the combine harvester," the firm added.

"Even in the more primitive countries the spotlight is on food production and large number of silos are being sent to many parts of Africa, the Middle East and Central America."

It's amazing how quickly times have changed with Bristol moving, in one generation, from an industrialised, manufacturing city – one that was busy exporting – to one based on insurance and home based service industries.

And let's not forget that the city was also once a leading manufacturer of lead products with Capper Pass in Bedminster, Rowe Bros in Canons Marsh and Shedon Bush in Redcliffe being well known names and major employers.

If you have any memories of Braby's products – or perhaps you were employed there ?

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Flickr The History of Bristol Motor Co. Ltd
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Article Published in the Illustrated Bristol News 1962

ON AN OCTOBER DAY in 1912 a young Bristol motor engineer put down the blueprint he had been studying closely. ‘We’ll buy one’, he said. That order placed just six days after the first customer had signed for one was for a new make of car which was about to be introduced by a newcomer to the motor industry. It was an order that, 50 years later, still shows the foresight of the man who made it.

For the car Mr. Arthur Edward Johnson, manager (later managing director) of Bristol Motor Company Limited, deelded to buy without ever having seen was the Morris Oxford, made by Mr. W. R. Morris.

The Bristol company have always pioneered the way for others. In 1898 they ran the first charabanc outing in the West Country; next year they opened the the first motor public transport system in the city, from the bottom of Blackboy Hill to the top of Westbury Hill; they made the original Bristol car in 1902 and two years later became the first to experiment with aluminium pistons and so one could go on.

They are now one of the biggest Morris distributors in the country and this year are celebrating the 50-year association with the Nuflield organisation which began when Mr. Johnson became the third person to order a Morris car. They also distribute the Riley, the Vanden Plas Princess (British Motor Corporation’s VIP car), Rolls-Royce and Bentley and Morris Commercial Vehicles.

Lord Nuffield the Mr. Morris from whom that first car had been ordered— thought so highly of the firm that in 1931 (when he was still Sir William Morris) he came to the city to open their new works at Ashton Gate. The showrooms and familiar clock tower have since become features of the district.

Mr. Johnson, who died in 1948, is believed to have made the first car trip from Bristol to London and not long before his death wrote, ‘so I celebrate my golden jubilee in the motor trade.

From the dusty and slimy surfaces and frightened horses of the late 19th and early 20th century roads, when to apply brakes would be to skid all over the road or to fire one’s brakes (the then most suitable linings being made of leather or poplar wood); from the days when it was a wonderful event to drive five miles without a compulsory stop... to the days when a motorist with no mechanical instincts can drive thousands of miles without giving his car attention’.

In the 1890’s he owned a motor tricycle and his early experience in the business was gained at Mr. W. M. Appleton’s Boulevard Cycle Depot, Weston-super-Mare. The first time he tried to sell a motor vehicle there he was overwhelmed with questions that were difficult to answer satisfactorily — like ‘How can you be sure the machine won’t catch fire?’ or ‘How can I keep respectable on dusty roads ?‘.

But he persevered, and in 1898 Mr. Appleton, sole proprietor of Bristol Motor Company, in Redcross Street, Bristol, offered him the management.

The new manager took the tiller of a Daimler wagonette on the West Country’s first charabanc outing which was held that same year. It is recorded that the outing was made ‘with the minimum of compulsory stops’.

The bus service from Blackboy Hill to Westbury the following year ran into trouble when the wind kept blowing out the bunsen burners used to heat the ignition tubes and the two vehicles on the route had to be converted to electric ignition. The increased power this gave made the tiller steering dangerous and steering wheels had to be fitted.

Three years after the buses began running, the first-ever Bristol car, a 10/12 h.p. twin-cylinder model, was made by the company. A 16/20 h.p. four-cylinder model came out three years later and a 1906 model can still be seen in Bristol Museum.

In 1910 the sales and service side of the business was taken over by the Bristol Wagon and Carriage Works but normal business was soon disrupted by the first World War, during which the Company played an important part in helping to sustain home food production by their work on farm tractors.

Changes of fortune followed, but in 1921 Mr. Johnson re-established the company. He became managing director and secretary; the chairman of the board (which also included Mr. G. Falconar Fry and Mr. T. A. Hill) was Mr. Edgar J. Jenkins. The managing director today is Mr. D. H. Phillips who joined the company in 1928, and the other directors are Mr. V. Fuller Eberle, M.C. (chairman) and Mr. A. R. Boucher.

From the old Bristol Wagon Works premises at 136-138 Victoria Street, the company spread the following year to a hall in Mill Lane, Bedminster. In 1924 premises in Thomas Street and Pile Street and a site at 147 Victoria Street were acquired; three years later new premises were opened on the site and 47 Queen’s Road was bought as showrooms. In 1927 the Triangle Garage, Clifton, was rented and in 1928 the site of the Ashton Gate works was bought.

When it was opened three years later it was the largest service and repair depot in the city and for miles around. From that time until the opening of World War 2 the works was never idle; three shifts worked round the clock on repairs and servicing, while the breakdown crews maintained a 24-hour vigil.

The firm was still expanding when the war brought double disaster. An early raid completely destroyed the fine showrooms and service station that had been opened in Redcliffe Street only in 1939. Then, in May 1941, when most of the worst bombing was over and while the company was busy with war work, a stray raider dropped incendiaries which left only the shell of the Ashton Gate premises standing.

They were rebuilt later, but the company decided not to go back to Redcliffe Street, which was considered to be too small for future developments. Instead they built the commercial vehicle depot on the Ashton Vale trading estate — a building which has twice since been extended and is now as large as the Ashton Gate headquarters.

There, in addition to the service and maintenance of commercial vehicles, the company carries out conversions, chassis extensions, engine reconditioning and a variety of other specialised work.

The Clifton service station at Jacobs Wells Road has a specially equipped section set aside for the large number of Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars regularly serviced by the company. B.M.C. vehicles are, of course, also serviced at this branch.

In all, the company have some 90,000 square feet of floor space at their disposal for repairs and servicing, plus about 30,000 square feet of leasehold land at Ashton Vale. The fact that every square inch is in use owes much to the management of Mr. Phillips; since he took over as managing director from Mr. Johnson in 1948 the company’s turnover has increased more than 600 per cent.

Much of this higher turnover may be attributed to the spare parts service, which has built up a high reputation for being able to produce the needed part in a remarkably short time.

The company’s stores hold 25,000 different components and accessories in stock, with 32 people fully employed in their cataloguing and distribution. One man within the stores is continually re-grouping items, changing their locations so that, no matter what new parts may be introduced, they are always with others related to them and can be found quickly.

Speed, in fact, is the recurrent theme in the stores’ work. Bristol Motor Company offer a unique service in which a staff of three ‘interpreters’ accept telephoned orders for spares, which are withdrawn from stock and ready for customers’ collection within the hour. Alternatively, parts will be despatched by rail or bus or by the fleet of deliveiy vans operated by the company. The three telephone staff handle upwards of 150 calls a day.

The delivery vans form part of another important service the same-day delivery within 20 miles of orders received by midday. In one week these vehicles make at least 500 calls on a regular ‘milk round’ timetable.

Four stock controllers keep track of the movements of parts through the stores, feeding the information back to the expert who is responsible for initial ordering so that new stocks can be drawn in no light job when the stores receive five tons of new supplies every week and issue some 1,500 parts each day.

It is a job which is liable to get even bigger in the years ahead as Bristol Motor Company continue to expand.

The company are continually reviewing their services and working arrangements, while seeking constantly to provide even wider facilities for road users as in the contract hire scheme recently introduced.

The past decades have seen Bristol Motor Company grow vigorously.

This trend will undoubtedly continue in the years to come.

See Photo Link Below

www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/2046062969/

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Flickr Wedlocks, Ashton Gate, Bristol BS3
Tags: uk   sport   bristol   football   pub   soccer   bedminster   grevillesmythpark   southville   publichouses   wedlock   bs3   bristolcity   ashtongate   bedminsterbristol   wedlocks   bristolshistoricpubs   
Wedlocks, the Ashton pub once run by City soccer legend Billy 'Fatty' Wedlock, could soon be demolished and the site turned into flats. Amid growing opposition to the plans. The 100-year-old Wedlocks pub which stands outside the gates of the hallowed Bristol City ground was renamed some 25 years ago in honour of that outstanding local player, Billy 'Fatty' Wedlock.

Wedlock, who remains to this day City's most-capped England player, became, on his retirement from the game, mine host at the hostelry, then known as The Star, a place he would remain for nigh on 50 years. But this old pub, beloved by generations of soccer fans, has been closed and boarded up for well over a year.

Now, in a last ditch attempt to save the hallowed building, Bristol City Supporters' Trust is trying to get the development company's plans for its demolition thrown out. They have drawn up a 'keep Wedlock's' petition - it's gained more than 1,500 signatures in just a couple of weeks - which people can sign either at the Southville Centre or at Ashton Gate on match days.

With the aid of many old-time supporters, many of them now living far away from Bristol, names are also being collected via an online petition on the council's website. If the plans are accepted by the council, the pub would be knocked down to make way for flats, a commercial unit and car parking. A director of Backwind, the developers, said: 'The pub was on the market for months and no one made any attempt to buy it. It's unviable as a business.

'When we bought it, it was semi-derelict, with no gas or electricity and there were holes in the roof. 'Residents say that they would be glad to see the back of the pub. Opposing supporters used to gather here, and quite often fights would break out. 'The only people who want it are the Bristol City Supporters' Trust. I would like to know why they think it's of benefit to the local community. The local populous are 100 per cent behind the development.'

Wedlocks has run into financial trouble before, with former landlords admitting that they found it a struggle to make ends meet. But, despite this, the pub was a favourite meeting up place and 'watering hole' for home fans on match days.

'Fatty' Wedlock's grandson, the singer and entertainer Fred Wedlock, recalled a childhood spent at The Star. He told Bristol Post: 'My dad was born and brought up there, and my uncle took over the licence when grandad died. I went to visit grandad there when I was small. 'It would be a great pity if a chunk of Bristol's history vanished into more flats. 'They did have trouble with neighbours complaining and with fans. But it failed mainly through bad management.

'It would be lovely to see it open again with the right support, but you have to be realistic about these things. Someone needs to look into why it failed and the possible options. 'I would very much like to see it remain as a pub with grandad's name above the door - but perhaps I'm just being sentimental.'

James Nichols, a spokesman for the supporters' trust, said: 'It's quite a landmark building, standing next to Greville Smyth Park, and you've also got the connection with Billy Wedlock, whose family ran it for several decades.

'We're looking into different options. From the fans' point of view, the building is somewhere to drink on match days, but the local community want a cafe by the park. 'There are also ideas about housing Bristol City memorabilia there. But the key thing now is to prevent the planning application going through.'

'Fatty' Wedlock, real name Billy, was a Bedminster lad, born in North Street on October 28,1880. He gained his, perhaps unkind, nicknamed because, fans said, he was as wide as he was tall. Although only standing only 5ft 5ins, Billy was incredibly fast on his feet and an amazingly athletic player.

Fans also labelled him the 'India rubber man' because of his agility and ability to bounce back from tough tackles. As an inspirational skipper, he led his men throughout the 1905/1906 promotion season. In February 1907, at Goodison Park, he became only the second City player to be capped for England (the first was Billy Jones in 1901). Fatty, who played at centre-half, helped England to a 1-0 win over Ireland.

Between 1906 and the outbreak of World War I in 1914, he won 26 caps playing for England. In those days, it must be remembered, caps were only awarded for appearances against Irish, Scottish and Welsh teams - not other internationals.

His only rival for the centre-half position was Manchester United's Charlie Roberts. In 1909, under Billy's inspired leadership, Bristol City were FA Cup finalists but lost 1-0 to Manchester United at Crystal Palace. By the time he retired, after the 1920/21 soccer season, Billy had made a total of 413 appearances in front of City fans.

'Fatty' Wedlock, who died on January 25,1965, is buried in Arno's Vale cemetery. Over the years there have been calls for a statue to his memory. A stand at Ashton Gate has been named in his honour. Wedlocks pub in Ashton Gate has ruled out the prospect of the site becoming a shrine for Bristol City fans. Developer John Skinner wants to demolish the old pub in Ashton Road - once a haven for City fans - and build apartments.

He said if new homes cannot be built, he will consider drawing up plans for a hostel or rehab centre on the site. Mr Skinner's redevelopment plans have angered some members of Bristol City Supporters Trust (BCST) who believe the building should be turned into a community cafe or Bristol City memorabilia centre.

They are campaigning to get Mr Skinner's planning application turned down and, if they are successful, the developer says he will look at other options such as hostels. A BCST spokesman said: 'The developer has said he may have to look at other options and we are saying he should ask members of the community what they want and consider something like a well-run cafe.'

The spokesman also said eight local groups were campaigning to save Wedlocks, as well as the four city councillors for Southville and Bedminster wards. Mr Skinner, director of Backwind Ltd, said: 'If we get refused planning then we will have to look at other options such as social rehabilitation and hostels.

'We've got to develop that site and it could be turned into a number of things. We will have to do it - we cannot afford to leave it there for ever. 'We are not going to fall foul of Government by not putting a redundant property to use.

'I would like to know how BCST is going to get hold of the building because they do not own it or control it. No one can apply for anything unless they buy it from us. 'It has been empty since 2005 and we are now in April 2007, so why in the last two years have these people never made their wishes known on this property until we put an application in?'

Wedlocks, which stands outside the gates of the club's ground, was re-named in 1981 in honour of Billy 'Fatty' Wedlock, who played for City 413 times before retiring in 1921. After he stopped playing, Wedlock took over the pub, which was then called The Star.

Plans have been submitted to the city council and, if accepted, the Bower Ashton Terrace building would be knocked down to make way for 18 one-bedroom flats, a two-bedroom flat, a commercial unit and car parking.

Mr Skinner said he had met residents from Bower Ashton Terrace on February 15 to discuss the proposals.

He said: 'They seemed to go away quite happy and made no mention they would not approve the application.

'The residents were delighted and glad to see the back of the building and the trouble it caused for many years. I've yet to hear from anyone objecting who actually lives near the pub.' Clive Haffner, a 53-year-old regional sales manager living in Bower Ashton Terrace, says Wedlocks is frequently vandalised by yobs and he will be glad to see the pub go.

He said: 'I have no problem whatsoever with this ugly building and appalling eyesore being demolished. 'The majority of those now bleating for the retention of Wedlocks either do not live in the area or never supported Wedlocks when it was open. 'The idea of a community cafe is laughable - exactly how many cups of tea and slices of cake would be needed to just pay the overheads?

'I suggest residents invest time in talking with the developers to ensure that whatever does replace Wedlocks becomes an asset to the community.'

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Flickr Ashton Gate - Bristol First World War
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1914 fatigue party of Bristol's Own Battalion Company Ashton Gate.
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Flickr Ashton Gate - Bristol First World War
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No 6 Horse Gun Team of the Warwickshire Regiment at Ashton Gate barracks in January 1916.
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Flickr Ashton Gate - Bristol First World War
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Officers of the 3/4th South Midland Howitzer Brigade at Ashton Gate barracks in 1916.
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Flickr First World War - 12th Glosters receiving rifle instruction at Ashton Gate
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Volunteers for the 12th Glosters receiving rifle instruction at Ashton Gate in 1914.
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Flickr Bristol City FC - Ashton Gate 1960s
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Bristol City's turf being replaced the stand behind was replaced by the current Dolman stand (named after a former chairman)in the 1960s.

MARINA'S LIFE WITH A CITY LEGEND

21 November 2006 - Harry Dolman became chairman of Bristol City F.C. in 1949, a post he would hold for over 30 years. An engineer who had bought out the firm he worked for, he designed the first set of floodlights installed at Ashton Gate in the early 1950s. In 1970 The Dolman Stand is built at a cost of £235,000 and is named after chairman Harry Dolman.

When Harry Dolman, a giant of Bristol's industrial and sporting life, married Marina in 1961, he was 63 and she was just 24. Quita Morgan talks to Marina about life with the Bristol City chairman. Marina Dolman met her first paparazzo on her wedding day, when he jumped onto the running board of the Rolls-Royce.That lone celebrity-hunter was unlucky - he had to leap from the moving limo with neither picture nor quote.

But for Marina it was a first glimpse of her future as the glamorous young wife of Bristol City chairman Harry Dolman. She was 24 and pretty, he was 63 and wealthy. Soon their secret was out - and about to be splashed across the front pages. After marrying quietly at Quakers Friars early one April morning in 1961, the couple held a reception for close family and friends at the Grand Hotel in Broad Street. 'Someone must have tipped off the newspapers, because we had to dodge reporters as we left the hotel,' Marina recalls, flashing the same smile that must have captivated Harry some 45 years ago.

'The Rolls was taken round to the back of the hotel to avoid the press, but one of them still managed to spot us. It was my introduction to what life as Harry's wife would be like.' Throughout 16 years of marriage and nearly 30 of widowhood, Marina has been a fervent soccer fan.

As well as being president of Bristol City FC, she has also been an active president of the supporters' club since her husband's death in 1977. At 70, she no longer runs the Chew Magna house which she and Harry chose as newlyweds, but has downsized to a home in South Gloucestershire.

But there's no danger that she will ever give up going to football.

She has been a regular fixture in the directors' box at Ashton Gate since her honeymoon, and she's proud to have turned into its longest resident. A Dame of the Order of St John and a former trustee of Bristol Cathedral, Marina was born in Hong Kong in 1936.

'My father was in the army and we sailed from China to India when I was six months old,' she recalls. 'We moved to Northern Ireland in 1939 and then to Wales, after war was declared. My mother and I could no longer travel with my father because of the war, so at first we stayed at my grandparents' house in Pembroke Dock, and then my mother rented a house in Tenby.

'While we were staying with my grandparents, I remember seeing a German plane overhead, and then the oil tanks on Barrack Hill go up in flames when the bombs dropped. 'My mother told me it was an air raid, and she picked me up in her arms, wrapped me in a blanket, and carried me down to the cellar.

'That was why we moved to Tenby, but we often visited my grandparents. One Sunday, in 1941, my grandmother tried to persuade us to stay the night.

'I remember mummy hesitating. But then she said no, we had to get the bus back to Tenby because I must not miss school the next day.

'That night my grandparents' house was bombed and razed to the ground. Fortunately, the family were all in the cellar and survived, though one of my aunts was badly injured.

'In 1942, we rented half a house in Blackpool to be near my father. But when he was posted back to India in 1944, mother and I went back to Wales.

'When my father was demobbed, he joined the civil service.

'We moved to Bristol in 1947. I hated the city at first because it was such a contrast to the freedom and beauty of Pembrokeshire. Bristol in those early post-war days seemed a dull, dark, grey bomb site.

'One day my father took me to the Central Library to help me with an essay I had to write, and afterwards we went next door to Bristol Cathedral.

'As we walked in, the sun was shining through the windows, and that was the first time I felt happy and relaxed in Bristol.

'I was sent to Merrywood Grammar School in Knowle, which I hated at first but enjoyed more after a while. We had a terrific headmistress and a very sound all-round education.

'After leaving I worked in an office for six months before going to the Phyllis Christie private secretarial college in Cheltenham.

'After that I worked in Bath, London and Hanover, where I lived for 18 months until my mother became unwell and asked me to come home.

Then she spotted Harry Dolman's employment advert in the newspaper; the job required not only secretarial skills but also knowledge of French and German.

'I wasn't at all keen,' recalls Marina, 'I had never heard of Harry Dolman or his engineering company, Brecknell, Dolman and Rogers Ltd, on Pennywell Road.

'Anyway, I wanted to be an air stewardess, not a secretary, but I replied to the advert for my mother's sake.

'Harry interviewed me and asked lots of questions before saying: 'I'd better test your shorthand, I suppose.'

I shall never forget that test. It was a really horrible piece of technical jargon and engineering terminology, but fortunately I was quite good at shorthand, and was able to read it back to him.

'That was November, 1959, when I was 23, and I married Harry 15 months later. For more than a year, it was strictly business, and then one day in March, 1961, while we were opening the post together, we laughed about something in one of the letters, and out of the blue Harry said: 'If I asked you, would you marry me?' (he was recently widowed).

'I thought he was joking, but he asked me to think about it. He was 39 years older than I was, so there was a lot to think about and talk about.'

'My parents were not very happy about it, and said I was wasting my life.

'It might sound a clich??, but Harry was my soulmate and once we had decided, there was no point in waiting.

'We married by special licence. No one knew apart from our families and close friends, but it caused uproar as soon as word got out because of the age difference.

'I probably married an older man because I spent my early childhood, before my younger sister came along, living with much older people.

'My mother was one of eight, and I was very spoiled as the baby of the family, with uncles and aunts who used to take me out; it meant I grew up finding people of my own age rather immature.

'I think the age gap between Harry and me seemed more like 20 years rather than 40, because in those days I was older than my years and he was younger than his.

'I enjoyed my life with Harry, and we had a great time. Never for one solitary moment did I regret my decision, and I know he didn't.'

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Flickr Ashton rail bridge Bristol 1960s
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The Ashton rail bridge when Bristol still had a full working railway system.

Ashton Gate railway station was a railway station serving an area of Bristol, England, which included Ashton Gate football ground, the home ground of Bristol City F.C.. It was located on the Portishead Railway.

Opened by the Great Western Railway, the station closed due to economies during the First World War. It then passed on to the Western Region of British Railways on nationalisation in 1948. It was then closed by the British Railways Board in 1964, then briefly reopened for traffic to the football ground until 1977, and temporarily re-opened in May 1984 to serve Mission England, a series of evangelical rallies by Billy Graham at the football ground.

The line through the former station still exists but in spite of attempts at passenger re-opening carries only freight for the Royal Portbury Dock.

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Flickr The Great Flood of 1968 Ashton Gate
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The flooded cottages close to Bristol City Football Ground, at Ashton Gate.

Memories of the flood of 68

GUY WORTHINGTON of Nailsea was a ten year old schoolboy in 1968, whose journey to school involved changing buses at Ashton Gate:— "I remember watching some men diving off the roadside railings into the flooded underpass, in a vain attempt to retrieve a totally submerged mini-car by pushing it up the slope. Several times they got it part way out but, through exhaustion, were unable to get it to the top and eventually they had to abandon it and let it roll back into the water."

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Flickr The Great Flood of 1968, Winterstoke Road, Ashton Gate, Bristol
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Flooded Winterstoke Road this main Bristol route was blocked for days. The tobacco factory of W D & H 0 Wills at East Street, Bedminster was brought to a standstill as the flood waters engulfed machinery, destroyed stocks, cut off power and telephones and damaged the firm’s £500,000 computer.

Dozens of shops in East Street suffered the same fate as the 3 foot deep tide swirled around the entire area. Several families were evacuated from their homes, the worst hit areas being Marksbury Road and Somermead.

During the night car drivers, including one whose car had been swept along for 300 yards before it came to rest, had to be rescued. As the fury of the storm abated and daylight came, the scene in East Street was one of dark, silent shops filled with sludge, slime and water; of shop counters, boxes, crates, wooden doors and all manner of debris floating down the road; and of numerous abandoned cars, lorries and vans. It was dubbed ‘Lake Bedminster’.

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Flickr The Great Flood of 1968 Ashton Gate
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The Great Flood of 1968 Winterstoke Road, blocked by a mile of water and abandoned vehicles.

Ashton Gate Flood Memories by Chris Smith: I was 6 at the time. We lived in Ashton Drive. remember waking up, looking out the window and seeing a man go down our road in a boat?.

The entire area was flooded including Bristol City Football Ground, Greville Smythe Park, Ashton Trading Estate and numerous houses. Residents of the ground floor flats in Southbow House and Winterstoke House were taken in by residents of the upper storeys and on Friday 12th July the ground floors of the multi-storey blocks were still under 3 feet of water.

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Flickr Bristol at War 1942 - St. Francis' Church, Ashton Gate
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St. Francis' Ashton Gate

The city was changed forever the 'City of Churches' became the 'City of Ruins'

The heart of the city from Broad Quay to Old Market bore the brunt of the raid, especially St James’s Barton and St. Philip’s and in Clifton, Bedminster, Knowle, and St. George.

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Flickr Bristol at War 1941 - Ashton Gate
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The Bristol Motor Company's Garage Winterstoke Road Ashton Gate.

See link below

www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/2129189182/

During the black-out trying to get around was confusing, frightening and dangerous. Road accidents were on the increase and drownings also rose dramatically where people fell off bridges and into rivers or into the city docks.

Damage to the utility services handicapped feeding arrangements and communal meals were inaugurated. It is estimated that, apart from commercial buildings, no fewer than 10,000 houses were damaged in some degree.

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Flickr Birth of the motorcar Bristol
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HISTORIES OF BRISTOL COMPANIES

1890 the staff of Bristol Motor Company BS3 pose for the camera outside the main gate to Ashton Court. - Bristol Motor Company Limited, were one of the biggest Morris distributors in the country.

ON AN OCTOBER DAY in 1912 a young Bristol motor engineer put down the blueprint he had been studying closely. ‘We’ll buy one’, he said.

That order placed just six days after the first customer had signed for one was for a new make of car which was about to be introduced by a newcomer to the motor industry. It was an order that, 50 years later, still shows the foresight of the man who made it.

For the car Mr. Arthur Edward Johnson, manager (later managing director) of Bristol Motor Company Limited, decided to buy without ever having seen was the Morris Oxford, made by Mr. W. R. Morris.

The Bristol company have always pioneered the way for others. In 1898 they ran the first charabanc outing in the West Country; next year they opened the the first motor public transport system in the city, from the bottom of Blackboy Hill to the top of Westbury Hill; they made the original Bristol car in 1902 and two years later became the first to experiment with aluminium pistons and so one could go on.

They are now one of the biggest Morris distributors in the country and this year are celebrating the 50-year association with the Nuflield organisation which began when Mr. Johnson became the third person to order a Morris car. They also distribute the Riley, the Vanden Plas Princess (British Motor Corporation’s VIP car), Rolls-Royce and Bentley and Morris Commercial Vehicles.

Lord Nuffield the Mr. Morris from whom that first car had been ordered— thought so highly of the firm that in 1931 (when he was still Sir William Morris) he came to the city to open their new works at Ashton Gate. The showrooms and familiar clock tower have since become features of the district.

Mr. Johnson, who died in 1948, is believed to have made the first car trip from Bristol to London and not long before his death wrote, ‘so I celebrate my golden jubilee in the motor trade.

From the dusty and slimy surfaces and frightened horses of the late 19th and early 20th century roads, when to apply brakes would be to skid all over the road or to fire one’s brakes (the then most suitable linings being made of leather or poplar wood); from the days when it was a wonderful event to drive five miles without a compulsory stop... to the days when a motorist with no mechanical instincts can drive thousands of miles without giving his car attention’.

In the 1890’s he owned a motor tricycle and his early experience in the business was gained at Mr. W. M. Appleton’s Boulevard Cycle Depot, Weston-super-Mare. The first time he tried to sell a motor vehicle there he was overwhelmed with questions that were difficult to answer satisfactorily — like ‘How can you be sure the machine won’t catch fire?’ or ‘How can I keep respectable on dusty roads ?‘.

But he persevered, and in 1898 Mr. Appleton, sole proprietor of Bristol Motor Company, in Redcross Street, Bristol, offered him the management.

The new manager took the tiller of a Daimler wagonette on the West Country’s first charabanc outing which was held that same year. It is recorded that the outing was made ‘with the minimum of compulsory stops’.

The bus service from Blackboy Hill to Westbury the following year ran into trouble when the wind kept blowing out the bunsen burners used to heat the ignition tubes and the two vehicles on the route had to be converted to electric ignition. The increased power this gave made the tiller steering dangerous and steering wheels had to be fitted.

Three years after the buses began running, the first-ever Bristol car, a 10/12 h.p. twin-cylinder model, was made by the company. A 16/20 h.p. four-cylinder model came out three years later and a 1906 model can still be seen in Bristol Museum.

In 1910 the sales and service side of the business was taken over by the Bristol Wagon and Carriage Works but normal business was soon disrupted by the first World War, during which the Company played an important part in helping to sustain home food production by their work on farm tractors.

Changes of fortune followed, but in 1921 Mr. Johnson re-established the company. He became managing director and secretary; the chairman of the board (which also included Mr. G. Falconar Fry and Mr. T. A. Hill) was Mr. Edgar J. Jenkins. The managing director today is Mr. D. H. Phillips who joined the company in 1928, and the other directors are Mr. V. Fuller Eberle, M.C. (chairman) and Mr. A. R. Boucher.

From the old Bristol Wagon Works premises at 136-138 Victoria Street, the company spread the following year to a hall in Mill Lane, Bedminster. In 1924 premises in Thomas Street and Pile Street and a site at 147 Victoria Street were acquired; three years later new premises were opened on the site and 47 Queen’s Road was bought as showrooms. In 1927 the Triangle Garage, Clifton, was rented and in 1928 the site of the Ashton Gate works was bought.

When it was opened three years later it was the largest service and repair depot in the city and for miles around. From that time until the opening of World War 2 the works was never idle; three shifts worked round the clock on repairs and servicing, while the breakdown crews maintained a 24-hour vigil.

The firm was still expanding when the war brought double disaster. An early raid completely destroyed the fine showrooms and service station that had been opened in Redcliffe Street only in 1939. Then, in May 1941, when most of the worst bombing was over and while the company was busy with war work, a stray raider dropped incendiaries which left only the shell of the Ashton Gate premises standing.

They were rebuilt later, but the company decided not to go back to Redcliffe Street, which was considered to be too small for future developments. Instead they built the commercial vehicle depot on the Ashton Vale trading estate — a building which has twice since been extended and is now as large as the Ashton Gate headquarters.

There, in addition to the service and maintenance of commercial vehicles, the company carries out conversions, chassis extensions, engine reconditioning and a variety of other specialised work.

The Clifton service station at Jacobs Wells Road has a specially equipped section set aside for the large number of Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars regularly serviced by the company. B.M.C. vehicles are, of course, also serviced at this branch.

In all, the company have some 90,000 square feet of floor space at their disposal for repairs and servicing, plus about 30,000 square feet of leasehold land at Ashton Vale. The fact that every square inch is in use owes much to the management of Mr. Phillips; since he took over as managing director from Mr. Johnson in 1948 the company’s turnover has increased more than 600 per cent.

Much of this higher turnover may be attributed to the spare parts service, which has built up a high reputation for being able to produce the needed part in a remarkably short time.

The company’s stores hold 25,000 different components and accessories in stock, with 32 people fully employed in their cataloguing and distribution. One man within the stores is continually re-grouping items, changing their locations so that, no matter what new parts may be introduced, they are always with others related to them and can be found quickly.

Speed, in fact, is the recurrent theme in the stores’ work. Bristol Motor Company offer a unique service in which a staff of three ‘interpreters’ accept telephoned orders for spares, which are withdrawn from stock and ready for customers’ collection within the hour. Alternatively, parts will be despatched by rail or bus or by the fleet of deliveiy vans operated by the company. The three telephone staff handle upwards of 150 calls a day.

The delivery vans form part of another important service the same-day delivery within 20 miles of orders received by midday. In one week these vehicles make at least 500 calls on a regular ‘milk round’ timetable.

Four stock controllers keep track of the movements of parts through the stores, feeding the information back to the expert who is responsible for initial ordering so that new stocks can be drawn in no light job when the stores receive five tons of new supplies every week and issue some 1,500 parts each day.

It is a job which is liable to get even bigger in the years ahead as Bristol Motor Company continue to expand.

The company are continually reviewing their services and working arrangements, while seeking constantly to provide even wider facilities for road users as in the contract hire scheme recently introduced.

The past decades have seen Bristol Motor Company grow vigorously.

This trend will undoubtedly continue in the years to come.

Article Published in the Illustrated Bristol News 1962.

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Flickr Bristol First World War - Ashton Gate
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1914 - A parade of soldiers recruited for service in the Army during WW1, St Francis' Church behind the hoardings it was built in 1891.
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Flickr the old toll house Ashton Gate, Bristol BS3
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Ashton Gate 1911 looking towards the old toll house and North Street. This building is now converted into old people's home.
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Flickr big bicycle problem at Ashton Gate, Bristol
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Match Day at Ashton Gate - Bower Ashton Terrace 1935

Little houses coping with a big bicycle problem. These houses were probably built for railway workers. Bristol City football matches in the late 1930/40's. The people in Bower Ashton Terrace would charge 3d to store the bicycles during the match.

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Flickr Bristol at War 1942 - Ashton Gate
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During the blitz of World War Two - Bristol City Football Ground at Ashton Gate took a direct hit.
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Flickr 1911 Ashton Gate, Empire Day
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1911 The Bristol City Football Ground on Empire Day at Ashton Gate.

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Flickr 1951 Ashton Gate, a local derby between the two Bristol Clubs
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Nothing divides a city like it. Nothing divides families like it. And there's nothing better for turning friends against each other. In Bristol you are either a Robin or a Gas Head. Blue or Red. Memorial or Ashton. The bitter rivalry between City and Rovers has caused much heartache over the years, and is bound to cause more for years to come.

Battle Of Bristol: City V Rovers 1958..Video Link

www.britishpathe.com/video/battle-of-bristol-city-v-rover...

Recent Updated: 6 years ago - Created by brizzle born and bred - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - brizzle born and bred
Flickr Ashton Gate `Fireworks
Tags: uk   england   night   bristol   fireworks   canonpowershots2is   cliftonsuspensionbridge   footballclub   bristolcity   ashtongate   isambardkingdombrunels   
Bristol - IMG_8175
Recent Updated: 6 years ago - Created by AreKev - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - AreKev
Flickr Bristol City Celebration
Tags: film   promotion   bristol   football   fuji   olympus   negative   om40   bristolcity   ashtongate   bristolcityfc   olympusom40   lastdayoftheseason   open2007   
Best seen Large.
Bristol City fans come together on the pitch to cheer the players and directors watching from the stand. Pure joy at promotion to the Championship.

Recent Updated: 7 years ago - Created by Impact Tarmac - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Impact Tarmac
Flickr Ashton Gate, 24 April 2007, after the game
Tags: bristol   rugby   project365   ashtongate   project365151   bbcable   
The game finished Bristol 30-Leicester 13, with Bristol back to third in the table and still in with a good chance of a playoff place with one game remaining.
Recent Updated: 7 years ago - Created by Chris Bertram - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Chris Bertram
Flickr Ashton Gate, 24 April 2007, Bristol Rugby v Leicester Tigers
Tags: bristol   rugby   ashtongate   bbcable   
Danny Gray (Bristol) has just taken a penalty (spot the ball?) to close the gap. The game finished Bristol 30-Leicester 13, with Bristol back to third in the table and still in with a good chance of a playoff place with one game remaining.
Recent Updated: 7 years ago - Created by Chris Bertram - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Chris Bertram
Flickr repeat: I am free
Tags: park   uk   england   streetart   bristol   graffiti   march   anarchy   2007   grevillesmythpark   ashtongate   
This again!
Recent Updated: 7 years ago - Created by knautia - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - knautia
Flickr Ashton Gate
Tags: bristol   ashtongate   bristolcity   footballground   aerial   balloonflight   hotairballoon   bcfc   footballstadium   stadium   footballpitch   soccerstadium   soccerpitch   football   soccer   nelsonmandelahouse   nelsonmandelatowers   nelsonmandelaflats   whitemeadhouse   onlyfoolsandhorses   redandwhite   redwhite   red   white   green   

Recent Updated: 9 years ago - Created by Dave ® - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Dave ®
Flickr Bristol City 0 Albion 0 - Ashton Gate 2003/4
Tags: photo   brightonhovealbion   bristolcity   ashtongate   dolmanstand   
Football League One - KO 15:00
Bristol C 0 (0) - 0(0) Brighton

At Ashton Gate on 24-04-2004

Bristol C: Phillips ,Carey ,Butler (Goodfellow ,78 ) ,Coles ,Hill ,Rougier (Murray ,51 ) ,Doherty ,Wilkshire (Tinnion ,51 ) ,Bell ,Peacock ,Roberts
Subs not used: Miller,Fortune,

Brighton: Roberts ,Virgo ,Cullip ,Butters ,Harding ,Reid ,Oatway ,Carpenter ,Jones (Piercy ,85 ) ,Knight ,Iwelumo (Hart ,74)
Subs not used Kuipers,Mayo,El-Abd,

Bookings: None

Attendance: 17088

Referee: Richard Beeby (Northamptonshire)

Recent Updated: 10 years ago - Created by JJ Willow - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - JJ Willow
Flickr Ashton Gate
Tags: photo   brightonhovealbion   bristolcity   ashtongate   

Recent Updated: 10 years ago - Created by JJ Willow - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - JJ Willow
Flickr Ashton Gate
Tags: photo   brightonhovealbion   bristolcity   ashtongate   

Recent Updated: 10 years ago - Created by JJ Willow - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - JJ Willow
Flickr Ashton Gate 013
Tags: bristol   ashtongate   
A victim of fire or lightning in the grounds of Ashton Gate.
Recent Updated: 10 years ago - Created by Keri_O'Shea - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Keri_O'Shea
Flickr Ashton Gate Platform, Bristol 1984
Tags: station   train   bristol   portishead   platform   railway   billygraham   ashtongate   
At the risk of boring some of my contacts, here are some more railway shots from the archives! This is Ashton Gate Platform on the Portishead branch, briefly reopened in May 1984 for visitors to see evangelist preacher Billy Graham at the Bristol City football ground.


Recent Updated: 30 years ago - Created by Blue Pelican - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - Blue Pelican
Flickr North Street, Ashton Gate, Bristol
Tags: cars   bristol   motorcycles   streetscene   northstreet   hillmanavenger   ashtongate   
North Street, Ashton Gate, Bristol, 31st July 1976
Recent Updated: 38 years ago - Created by David Rostance - View

Copyright and permission to use should be sought to the author - David Rostance